Skip to Main Content
College of Arts and Sciences
twoColumn twoLeft

Undergraduate Programs of Study

The Department of English offers the following majors:

  • Bachelor of Arts in English
  • Bachelor of Arts in English, Concentration in Creative Writing
  • Accelerated B.A. to M.A. Program
  • Interdisciplinary Studies Majors in Film
    • Film
    • Film & Production
    • Film & Screenwriting

The department offers the following minors:

  • Creative Writing
  • Film
  • Literature
  • Professional & Public Writing

For program of study information, see the tabs below. For more information about our program, email us at englishdept@unf.edu.

Bachelor of Arts in English

The Department's mission is grounded in the conviction that a knowledge of literature and language and a mastery of interpretive skills are absolutely integral to a liberal education. Based on that conviction, and consonant with the goals and mission of the University of North Florida and the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of English strives to offer instruction of the highest quality in all areas of the curriculum within its purview. The Department's goal is to make a significant and indeed life-long contribution to the intellectual growth of each of its students. Further, the Department offers students the opportunity to acquire specific professional skills and to become generally proficient in the use and analysis of language. Such training is solid preparation for virtually any profession that involves communication.

Program of Study

Concentration: Accelerated B.A. to M.A. in English

Take three graduate classes while you are an undergraduate. Nine credit hours will count towards both a B.A. and M.A. in English.

To start the application process, follow the instructions under "Process." 

The Accelerated BA/MA Concentration offers the following perks:

  • Earn an MA with only one additional year of study after you earn your bachelor’s degree in English.
  • Use undergraduate financial aid and/or scholarships as partial payment for three graduate courses.
  • Enter the M.A. program in English without taking the GRE.
  • Save the costs of living by earning an MA more quickly.

You must complete the following:

  • Major in English.
  • Earn a 3.5 GPA in your English classes.
  • Complete 21 hours of English major requirements, including ENG 4013 Approaches to Literary Interpretation, before applying.
  • Meet with COAS English Undergraduate Advisor and English Graduate Coordinator at the beginning of your junior year.
  • Solicit two UNF Department of English faculty to write recommendation letters.

Graduate classes replace nine hours of undergraduate study (one upper level English class and six hours of free electives). Undergraduate classes must be planned carefully so that the student has the appropriate classes available to replace with graduate courses.

Contact the Graduate Coordinator or more information.

A master's in English opens the door to more careers. Also visit our alumni page that features an career list for our recent M.A. graduates.

See University Catalog page for general information on UNF BA/MA programs.

Creative Writing Program

The Creative Writing Program at UNF offers the following majors and minors: 

  • Bachelor of Arts in English with a Concentration in Creative Writing
  • Creative Writing Minor

Creative Writing Concentration

The Creative Writing concentration trains students to write imaginatively. They take creative writing workshops alongside courses in literary history and analysis, with options in digital media, film studies and rhetoric. Besides pursuing traditional careers in the discipline—like publishing, teaching, journalism, library science and creative writing — our students succeed in business, law and all fields that value critical and creative thinking. Our students pursue graduate degrees in English, creative writing, rhetoric and technical communication. Interested students should reach out their advisor and to Mark Ari, Creative Writing Coordinator for more information.

Creative Writing Concentration Program of Study

Creative Writing Minor

The Minor in Creative Writing offers students the chance to explore the full spectrum of literary genres including fiction, poetry, screenwriting, and creative nonfiction. For English majors, the sequence connects the study of literature to the process that produces it. For students in any major, it is an opportunity to develop writing and general communication skills and to enhance both critical and imaginative thinking that find application in any endeavor. And for students who seek a writing life, it is a good beginning: they learn to read as writers, develop and revise works for peer review, and refine their efforts for possible submission to journals or for a graduate school application portfolio. They and all of our students have exciting opportunities to participate in a community of writers through readings, events, and publications.

Creative Writing Minor Program of Study

Scholarship & Award Opportunities

Amy Wainright Scholarship Awards for Creative Writing

Creative Writing Scholarship

Lovee K. Kliman Scholarship for Artistic Expression

Publications

The Talon Review

Flock

EAT  

Mudlark

Readings & Events

River House: Creative Writing at UNF

Word by Word Reading Series

Film Program

The Film Program at UNF offers the Interdisciplinary Studies Film Major and the Film Minor.

Why study film?

Film is often considered the only new art form produced in the 20th Century. The 21st Century has witnessed the explosion of moving images into nearly every sphere of contemporary life, and advances in technology have made film/video/audio technology widely and easily available. The question is not why study film, but why not?

Film functions as a unique art form, a social barometer, a cultural artifact, an historical record, a political argument, an agent of change, and a good time. It's complex in construction and function, and yet directly powerful in its effect.

Because film is multi-dimensional and interdisciplinary, the Film Minor invites students from all and any majors to join in the study-and production-of film in the English department.

  • English majors can add audio and visual components to their textual analysis.
  • Music majors can consider how their music could interact with film.
  • Engineers will recognize the technology and design required at every level of filmmaking.
  • Advertising majors can explore the impact of images in communication.
  • Business majors can study the economic transformation of film industries.
  • Art and Design majors might be eager to make films to test and transform their own media.
  • Political scientists or anthropologists might want to study or make films in their capacity to preserve, document, or change culture.
  • Education majors can learn the history of cinema to order to use it as a tool to teach art, history, politics, and culture.
  • Photography majors can consider the image afresh by putting it in motion.
  • Biologists can consider film as a document of the natural world.
  • Historians can engage cinema history as well as recognize film as a document of history itself.
  • Philosophers might bring the topics of ethics, phenomenology, and meaning into their study of film.

Because the reach of film is so wide, the film minor thrives as a community when students come from varied perspectives and fields of study. To study film is to study image, sound, motion, and time in a way that can encompass all of the above perspectives and many more. Its capacity for complexity is as great as its capacity for lucidity.

Film Major Programs of Study Film Minor Program of Study

Literature Minor

The Literature Minor provides students with the opportunity to design a five-course curriculum suited to their interests. Do you have an interest in different kinds of literature--American, British, and/or world literature? Do you have an interest in a combination of drama and creative writing? Would you like to focus on literary criticism and theory? Are there five courses in our department that would supplement your major in some way? Do you have an interest in acquiring advanced writing and editing skills--which business leaders across the country say are a top consideration for them when they are hiring? Are you pre-med or pre-law? (Medical and Law schools look very favorably on students with literature backgrounds.) Do you just plain love literature? Whatever your reasons, we welcome you to the Literature minor. 

Program of Study

Note:

Students should consult with Academic Advisors each semester to ensure that they are meeting the appropriate requirements of the minor. College of Arts & Sciences Advising: Building 51, Room 2500, (904) 620-2797.

Professional and Public Writing Minor

The Department of English offers a minor in Professional and Public Writing to prepare students to write confidently and effectively in professional situations and for public and community action. Students can choose to focus on professional writing, where they analyze and produce genres required by employers; public writing, where they study and engage in meaningful social action through written and digital texts; or a combination of courses tailored to students' own interests.

Surveys of business leaders indicate that as many as 85% or more employers are not looking to hire someone who has majored in a particular field. They are looking for smart, well-educated individuals who have 21st-century skills, including (i) the ability to present information well orally and in writing, (ii) the ability to support a claim with pertinent evidence, (iii) the ability to approach problems systematically, (iv) training in analyzing the component features of problems quickly and accurately, (v) and the capacity to reach smart conclusions that give themselves and others a solid basis for making a decision and taking action. The Professional and Public Writing Minor provides students with opportunities to develop these skills.

There will always be employment opportunities for people with strong analytic and writing skills. The market (local, national, and global) needs people who can read critically, analyze quickly and accurately, translate their ideas in ways others can readily grasp, and write clearly and persuasively. The Small Business Administration has long recognized that the key factor in business success is communication skill, and that the major sub-factor is being able to write well. Communication and writing abilities are, in a world, foundational for someone who wants to thrive in an information and communication-based economy.

Program of Study