PHI3670: Relativism and Disagreement 3

Description: Disagreement concerning how we should live and what we should believe is widespread and persistent. A prevalent response to such disagreement is some kind of relativism – some claim that both parties to the disagreement are correct. In this course we will look at the case for and against ethical relativism (relativism about what we should do) and epistemic relativism (relativism about what we should believe). We will also look in a more direct way at the epistemic significance of disagreement itself. Can reasonable people come to different conclusions even when they have the same evidence? How should we modify our beliefs (if at all) when we encounter another who disagrees with us? And when (if ever) can beliefs be rationally maintained in the face of disagreement?