Skip to Main Content
Plants of the UNF Campus

Rhapis excelsa - Lady palm
Family Arecaceae

Description:

About twelve species of Rhapis are native to Asia. All are relatively small, clustering palms with fan-shaped leaves. The lady palm spreads slowly by rhizomes, developing into a dense bamboo-like clump. It grows best in a shady site. Because of its shade tolerance, it is used as a house plant. 

Location:

See this plant in the Founders Plaza on the north side of building 2.

Size:

A large, shrubby clump of unbranched stems to about eight to ten feet tall.

Care Instructions:

Light: part shade to shade

Water: drought tolerant when established, responds well to irrigation

Soil: adaptable, no special requirements

Lady palm is near its northern limit in northeast Florida. Various sources report its cold hardiness at the low to mid-20’s F. This reflects stem cold hardiness. The underground stems can survive and resprout after temperatures in the teens.

Rhapis excelsa

Lady palm

Arecaceae

About twelve species of Rhapis are native to Asia. All are relatively small, clustering palms with fan-shaped leaves. The lady palm spreads slowly by rhizomes, developing into a dense bamboo-like clump. It grows best in a shady site. Because of its shade tolerance, it is used as a house plant. 

See this plant in the Founders Plaza on the north side of building 2.

A large, shrubby clump of unbranched stems to about eight to ten feet tall.

part shade to shade

drought tolerant when established, responds well to irrigation

adaptable, no special requirements

Lady palm is near its northern limit in northeast Florida. Various sources report its cold hardiness at the low to mid-20’s F. This reflects stem cold hardiness. The underground stems can survive and resprout after temperatures in the teens.