Spring 2017

Contents:

Academic Technology Grants 

Blackboard will be Decommissioned on May 31

Monthly Wireless Network Maintenance

New Travel and Expense Software Application 

Cyber Security Symposium - March 16  

Security Tip: How to Identify a Phishing Email 

 

Academic Technology Grants  

Last year, Administration and Finance funded over $13,000 worth of Academic Technology grants. These grants support the technology needs of the faculty in service of their teaching, research/creative, and service activities in situations where no other resources are available. In the fall of 2016, the Faculty Association's Campus Technology Committee reviewed fifteen applications and recommended funding for five. Each grant will provide support of up to $1000 towards information technology requirements per funded individual project, or up to $2000 for multiple faculty members working together. Applications for the spring 2017 funding round are due Friday, Feb. 3. Click here for more information and application details. Questions about Academic Technology Grants can be directed to Gordon Rakita at grakita@unf.edu or (904) 620-1658. 

Blackboard will be Decommissioned on May 31, 2017 

The University has been transitioning their learning management system from Blackboard to Canvas since last summer. On May 31, 2017, Blackboard will be taken offline and Canvas will become the sole learning management system for the campus. CIRT is providing ongoing faculty support and training on the use of Canvas. The ITS Help Desk has been assisting students with the change as well. 

Monthly Wireless Network Maintenance

On the first Sunday morning of each month the campus wireless network will be unavailable for about 30-45 minutes between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. for scheduled maintenance. If the first Sunday of the month should fall on an academically critical time (e.g. final exams, drop/add), the maintenance will be pushed back one week. 
UNF's wireless infrastructure is aging and the monthly maintenance will help keep it operational until it can be replaced.  ITS has completed the vendor review process and selected a new campus wireless solution. Work on the deployment schedule is in progress and more information will be communicated when a timeline has been determined for replacing the current infrastructure. 

New Travel and Expense Software Application

UNF has selected Concur to replace its current Travel & Expense application. Ellucian, the vendor of our current system, will no longer support the Travel & Expense module of Banner. Additionally, the satisfaction faculty and staff have with T&E was not at the desired level. Concur will be used to request travel authorization, book travel, process travel reimbursements, and reconcile PCard transactions. Travelers and approvers will be able to use Concur’s mobile app to book a trip, capture receipts, create and submit expense reports and approve travel. Concur will enable better integration, easy report creation, and configurable dashboards.

With the new system, there will be a travel agency, World Travel, to help with booking flights, hotels, car rentals, assist with any unexpected travel changes, etc. This will especially benefit group and athletics travel. Another advantage will be improved compliance. The University will have better data on when travel is taking place and what is spent to travel. This data should provide the travel agency with leverage to negotiate better pricing and benefits with the airlines. When our students travel, there will be improved “Duty of Care”, which enables the University to know where students are so we can communicate with them and reroute them should a risky situation develop.

More information about Concur will be communicated later this year.

Cyber Security Symposium - March 16 

ITS will host their fourth Annual Cyber Security Symposium on Thursday, March 16 at the Adam W. Herbert University Center. This day long event will feature a number IT security experts providing their insight on the latest and greatest on cyber security issues and challenges. An announcement will be made in Osprey Update when registration is open. 

Security Tip: How to Identify a Phishing Email

Phishing is an attempt to collect sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details, often for malicious reasons, by disguising as a trusted entity in electronic communication. Last November, Information Technology Services' security team sent out an email to faculty and staff that imitated a phishing scam. Nearly half of the faculty/staff who received the suspicious email clicked the link within the message. Another 35 percent typed their UNF ID and password into the site. If this had been a real phishing scam, the people who clicked on the link could have infected their computer with a virus and those who entered their UNF ID and password could have had their UNF account and information compromised. Luckily, this was a simulation, so nothing bad happened. The purpose of this exercise was to raise awareness about phishing emails and educate faculty and staff to be observant and catch phishing attacks before they do harm.


Many phishing emails are easy to identify - they contain misspelled words or poor grammar or come from an unknown email address, but some are difficult to discern. 


What are the things to look for in an email that could indicate it is a scam?

  1. If you receive an email that appears to be from a company or website you do business with that asks you to input personal information, such as your username, password or bank account details, do not respond to it or click on any links. If you are concerned there may be an actual problem with your account, navigate to the website yourself and log in. 
  2. Hover your mouse over the top of the web address in an email and if what you see is different from the actual link that is displayed, the message is probably fraudulent or malicious. Please see in the example to the right, the link in the box does not state “unf.edu” but instead says “unf.tk”. 
  3. Be cautious even if the email looks like it came from a UNF email address. Emails can easily be spoofed (forged sender). 
  4. Suspect any email offer that seems too good to be true or is from someone with whom you have not initiated action (e.g. information about a job for which you did not apply).  
  5. Be wary of any email asking you to enter your login ID/password or update your account information.  
  6. Be suspicious if something just does not look/feel right. The idea is if something looks off, there is probably a good reason why. If you receive an email that seems suspicious, it's usually in your best interest to delete the message
 
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Questions or comments regarding this Technology Update may be directed to its-infomail@unf.edu