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Official Spanish Correspondence Pertaining to Relations with the Uchiz Indians: Section 1 Letters from 1771 – 1776

Juan Josef Eligio de la Puente to Julián de Arriaga, Havana, July 2, 1771.

The shameful and sad situation in which the fifteen Indians of Florida remain, who came to this City when it was turned over to the British Crown, and including the attached relation, places me in the position of, with the greatest veneration, humbly submit to Your Excellency that it would serve as a token of Compassion to raise this notice to the King and promote it with your benign influences, so that the Piety of His Majesty deems it worthy to console them with this gracious gift, which, in the terms expressed in the aforementioned relation, solicit his Sovereign’s Royal Clemency. Truthfully, Most Excellent Sir, they live in such a forsaken and destitute state that not only do they not have anyone who values them enough to take care of them, there does not exist any sufficient reason why they should toil and suffer so, and so I have not been able to deny them protection, with as much as my meager resources can achieve.

In Relation [to the first] of the 6 Floridian Families, who were directed to the hands of Your Excellency by this Captaincy General, they are judged worthy of the Alms in question, as earned by the rest of their class. Jointly they comprise of 45 persons of both sexes who exist at this date as families of Indians native to the region; amongst them are the named 15 Women. They previously composed of 16, but one of them has already died. It is proposed that they receive the cited per diem salary of one and one half reales, with the exclusion of the half real salary which the other thirty enjoy, which has been submitted to the Royal order for the approval of the mentioned relations, under the terms of conceding them Alms to those that do not possess them currently, and not as a request for a raise in salary from those already receiving aid, but hoping to experience such luck, the referred 15 Indians.

In their virtue, I repeat my reverent pleas to Your Excellency so that, with the Charity to which you are accustomed, it would serve you to attend to these poor helpless ones, who of course confidently hope that they can gain the remedy to their growing needs through the justification of Your Excellency, to whose obedience I offer my respects and services....

Names of the Indians
Josepha Domínguez
Francisca de la Cruz
Merenciana del Cruz
Ynes de la Encarnación Chucufiestas
Juan María del Rosario Chucufiestas
Francisca Gutiérrez
Ana María de la Vrisa
María de los Ángeles Vrisa
María de la Concepción Vrisa
María Manuela Guerrero
María Santos
Ana María Caracas
Rosalia Manreza
Bárbara Candelaria Santos

Of the manner in which the aforementioned fifteen Indians solicit that they are applied, each and every one, the expressed Alms of one and one half reales per diem, and that the other thirty Persons of both Sexes, and their Families, no longer receive the half real per diem, as they administered at this present date, on the basis the with this meager sum it is impossible to sustain themselves or pay the rent for a small House where they all reside, with the reason that the other females have intermarried with naturals of this Country, that they have other means and resources on which they can live. The rest are single men, and robust enough to work, as is verified by their various trades, or to fish, or to cut firewood in order to sustain themselves. These are truthful reasons which seem to justly deserve the consideration of the King, and that it would be worthy of his Sovereign Clemency to concede them the assistance which they seek under the terms and provision which the other Spanish Families from Florida currently enjoy. Since according what has been expressed there is no new expense for the Royal Estate, it would be best to distribute the current expense more equally and grant these Alms.

Source: Archivo General de Indias, Seville, Spain (hereafter, AGI), Cuba 1211, f 27, 28.

Julián de Arriaga to the Governor of Havana, Marquis de la Torre; San Lorenzo, 12 October 1771

In the attached letter, don Juan Josef Eligio de la Puente, employee of the General Administration of Expenditure of this Island (Cuba), solicits that the 15 female Floridian Indians discussed in the accompanying message have their per diem allotment raised to the sum of one and one half reales, from the current sum of a half real which they are administered along with the rest of their class. Due to the impossibility to sustain themselves with this small amount that they are currently being given, he proposes the method of reducing the amount received by the other Persons of this species, so that it does not result in a new expenditure for the Royal Estate. And, as the King wants to inform you, Sir, what it has been issued in regard to this matter, I provide you with his Royal order for its completion, including towards this end the cited documents. 

Source: AGI Cuba 1211, f 25. Julián de Arriaga was Secretary of State for the Navy and the Indies.

Julián de Arriaga to the Governor of Havana Marquis de la Torre; Havana, 21 October 1771

Having taken into account what the predecessor of don Antonio Bucareli wrote in the Letter dated the 9 of this past August, I have dispensed the bonuses to the Confidants who were dispatched to the Foreign Colonies to investigate their actions as pertained to the suspicious disappearance of some 1627 pesos and six reales and some additional 614 pesos and two reales for the entertainment and maintenance of the Uchiz Indians who presented themselves in this Plaza, the balance of which was taken from the General Treasury as a secret expense. The King has been notified of this and has approved of the disposition of these distributions, and I am writing to advise you, Sir, of this intelligence.

Source: AGI, Cuba 1211, f 49.

Juan Josef Eligio de la Puente; Havana, 4 March 1773 

Relation of the Expenditures made, by the Royal Estate, in the Gifts, Supplies and Maintenance of 14 Indians of the Uchiz Nation of the Province of Cabeta, who, from the Tampa Bay, transferred themselves to this City on 14 February 1773;                                   

Names of the Indians
Estimaslayche
Lajaliqui
Fiballe
Yslanuquese
Ymattipique
Estechaque
Chasliche
Coulapé
Licousle
Sachile
Mislaque
Faiche
Sousa
Tortuse

Goods and effects, with which they have been gifted, and food for their journey back to their Villages

14 White Shirts
14 Handkerchiefs
14 Yarned Handkerchiefs
14 pieces of Silk Ribbon
14 pieces of Wool Ribbon
14 Fresadas [old Spanish food of flour, milk, and butter]
14 black Sombreros
14 pair Shoes of Plant Material
14 pair metal buckles for said Shoes
79 1/2 Varas of blue woolen cloth...for 14 long coats of the Casacón variety
224 reales paid to a Master Tailor, for the works and material, of said long coats
112 reales worth of 14 dozen metal buttons, for the said long coats
14 shaving Razors
14 Razors for cutting
14 pair of Scissors
14 Candle Rods
14 small Mirrors
14 small Combs
14 small light wooden Combs
28 ounces of cinnabar powder
112 reales worth of glass beads
56 reales worth of Soap
2 pounds of white yarn
2 ponds of Tailor Soap [for marking cut points on cloth]
14 reales worth of sewing Needles
11 pieces of costume jewelry
87 Bone Pipes for smoking
13 reales for 3 pounds of ground Tobacco, with the corresponding small containers of plated jade
3 small Containers of ground Tobacco
5 painted paper Fans
7 Heads of tanned leather
14 Pieces of Hemp
14 Glass Bottles
28 Coconuts, for Baby Rattles
14 Small Machetes, with their sheaths
14 Bits for horses
14 pair of iron spurs, for said horses as is fashionable in the Kingdom of New Spain
5 irons for branding, like those of the margin
14 iron hoes, for working the earth
2 Blades for Carpenter’s Planes, one flat and the other curved
6 Hatchets for washing
2 Carpenter’s planes with their cases
2 Handsaws
2 iron files for said Handsaws
4 drill bits
96 reales worth of nails of various sizes
6 iron Padlocks
4 Small Cauldrons of yellow metal
1 Small copper Cauldron
14 arrobas of biscocho
2 barrels of brandy
14 arrobas of Ground Sugar
2 fanegas of salt
48 reales worth of sweet Cane
84 bunches of tobacco, worth 197 1/2 reales, half of which were for the aforementioned 14 Indians and the other half to be distributed amongst the Chiefs of the Province of Cabeta

Supplies for the Sea journey

2 arrobas de bizcocho
4 Loads of casabe
2 cases with 9 arrobas, 11 pounds of Beef jerky
1 case with 9 arrobas of Pork jerky
1 barrel of honey with 6 separate containers
32 reales worth of Squash and sweet potatoes

Supplies consumed in this City

798 reales spent in 19 days, at the sum of 3 reales per each one of the Cited Indians, beginning with the morning of the 14 of the past Month when they arrived on land, until today, when they embarked and left around sunset.

Total
1,103 pesos, 5 1/2 reales

Source: AGI Cuba 1164

Juan Josef Eligio de la Puente to the Governor of Havana, the Marquis de la Torre; Havana, 6 March 1773

In the notice sent to you dated the 18 of the past month, I explained to Captain [Spanish, not Uchiz title] Estimslayche of the Uchiz Nation, through the Interpreter Phelipe Pérez, that it seemed proper that (without disgust, taking into account the just motives of what occurs at present) I not allow him the offer to, in the name of his Emperor and his leaders, come and take the Castle of San Marcos de Apalache nor to provide them the Arms and Munitions which he asked for in order to conduct the crude war that they have declared against our new neighbors in Florida [the British]. Since Spain remains in perfect harmony with England, in the utmost state of peace and friendship, it was impossible to concede them such pretensions that would immediately interrupt the good harmony which is being maintained by the Princes of the Courts of these two Crowns. With full knowledge of the blind obedience that the said nation of Uchizes, as well as those of the Talapuses, Apiscas and Choctaw, offer to our Master, the King, as a test of the love and loyalty that they profess for him, you should send this notice without delay, Sir, to His Majesty, whose Royal Clemency will no doubt appreciate it, as it corresponds to the long-establish Paternal love that he has always held and will continue to hold for the Indians. The notice validates the growing expenditures that the Royal Estate has suffered and continues to suffer for the purpose of the sustenance of and gifts submitted to the continuous troupes of men, women and children that travel down to the Plaza de San Agustín de la Florida and later pass through this City, where, despite finding us separated from any immediate correspondence with them, they have been attended to in all of the terms expressed in relation to their daily allotments, clothing and other effects of which I gave proper account and, in virtue of your indicated office, they, as well as their companions, have been assisted and gifted upon their arrival.

His (Estimayslache’s) response, as he raised himself up out of the chair in which he was sitting, was dedicated first to giving due thanks for the affable hospitality and generous treatment which he had received, then concluded, with a tone bordering between tense and arrogant, in the following manner:

That he does not forget that the great King of Spain is the greatest of the rulers in the world. That before his power and force, the many Nations that cover the Earth tremble and cower, as is generally admitted by the many Indigents of the numerous Provinces formerly of the Empire of Moctezuma, which could only be conquered by Spanish Arms and not by any other of the children of the sun [indigenous groups of Mexico at the time of the Conquest, who referred to themselves as “children of the sun”]. That if desirable it would not be difficult to destroy the English of Florida and have His Majesty’s Christian Vassals come to live there. That he has was not born with two Tongues in his mouth, as are the snakes, but only one which is borne of the heart and with which he only desires to speak the truth. He has to do so, for he does not know how to tell a lie. The depths of his soul are loving and compassionate. And that in firm belief of this, he returned to beg you, Sir, that you recount to His Majesty the content of his message, because he came with the confidence that it would later arrive at His Royal attention, that he would be moved to give the utmost and secure promises to console them and would comply with what has been so often promised to them, that they would not be abandoned, and on that occasion he would see fit to allow them to make war on his enemies the English. In light of my refusal of this offer, it seemed to him that they could not yet, in any fashion, remedy the situation without to giving rise to anger, as he had come across many false and evil men who told many lies designed to influence and advise the Nations of the indigents belonging to the continent of Florida, that these men had decided amongst themselves that in this manner the Indians would kill each other, thereby allowing them to take free possession of their lands. Having been warned of this, it has caused so much anger amongst the indigents that they will Never lose sight of it and that they will take vengeance and continue to shed blood until they have either destroyed the English or until the English have finished off the Indians (who in this case, lacking firearms, have resolved to use their old Arrows, since they have not forgotten how to use them).

As a result of the above, which is in essence exactly as he had pronounced, the aforementioned Captain Estimaslayche tersely asked me to answer him, to which I responded with the following:

That I was certain of and believed in the magnanimous heart and heroic qualities of our Master, the King, but that the Sovereigns from whence the Sun was born write and sign their peace treaties as the best method of maintaining friendly correspondence, in terms that make it difficult to break them at will, except for in certain cases when they are offended or persecuted. That if the King of Spain continued as he does now in peace with the King of England, and he (Estimayslache) resolved to, without his (the King’s) knowledge, take the Castle of Apalache and have the Christians [Spaniards] populate Florida, the King would be in default of what he agreed to and was obligated to comply with at the end of the previous war, when he voluntarily ceded that fort and the Provinces to the English, and would appear to be no better than those who have forked tongues like the snakes. That such treason and indignity did not exist in the generous and noble heart of His Majesty; and so that the only resource that could be considered to alleviate his problems was that they dedicated their lives to Our Master (the King), who governs his men and all things of the World so that, with his infinite knowledge and goodness, he is able to determine how to help them, through proper methods, achieve what they hope for and desire.

These reasons seem to satisfied him and his companions, since they all left to embark on the 4th of the Current (month) with happy and content looks on their faces.

Of all that I have explained, of the terrible venom which I have perceived coming from the said Indians towards the English, I am persuaded that they intend to make war. It could spread even further; I know the dispositions of the former, because, according to what I have heard and what they plan, they will not stop until the moment in which they burn the Town of San Agustín de la Florida and that of Santa María de Gálvez de Panzacola, those with the largest number of houses and Estates that they (the English) possess on that continent [peninsula of Florida], in which case one should not be surprised if the English attribute their influence to the Spaniards, supporting their presumption with the fact that our Fishermen that travel to the coasts of West Florida and that they travel to this City (Havana). To combat, over time, similar suspicions, and so that there is no motive which would disrupt the good harmony between the two Crowns, to me it is indispensable to make it known to you, Sir, that in my experience, the proper method to remedy this problem without angering the Indians (because we are not going to, in any way, shape or form, dissuade them) is to completely prevent our fishermen from passing by the aforementioned coasts of West Florida, since, even though they still will travel to the keys of the North, also known as the Mártires, it will not be so easy for the Indians to travel there. And even if this occurs (which is not impossible) then we will be able address any complaint that the English make with the answer that the said keys are legitimate possessions of the Spanish Crown and that her Vassals can not nor should not be prevented from fishing there. It is well-understood that, as it manifested it to you, Sir, in my previous report dated the 16 of the past (month), they will catch very few Fish and we will then lack the indispensable necessities for Lent, of which I report with my thoughts towards no other end than the better Service of the King and of the state, which is the object of all my care and attention. Sir, with your most mature accord, you will be able to take the measures that would result in the best possible solution of the matter, raising it if you deem it worth to the attention of His Majesty for his Sovereign Royal Intelligence and determination.

Attached is the relation of the cost of the gifts, supplies and maintenance of the enunciated 74 Indians, which, in virtue of what has been outlined in your cited notice of the 18th of the past (month), I have submitted them in the terms dictated in that letter and concerning the budget, of which, as they are all important men, it was not possible to conduct with less expenses nor greater economy, in the purchase of effects and food....

Source: AGI Cuba 1164, f 248-251

Governor Marques de la Toree to Señor Arriaga, Havana, 28 March 1773

In the letter dated 26 [February], Number 37, I informed Your Excellency of the pretensions of the Messengers which were sent by the Indians of the Province of Cabeta and also of the manner in which I had determined to dispatch them. And having verified their departure from this Port on the 4th day of [March], I direct to Your Excellency’s hand a copy of the notice given to me by don Juan Josef Eligio de la Puente, Accountant of this Tribunal of Accounts, in order that I could see that he effectively dealt with the said Messengers in the manner which he I had told him.

They have left, as it seems, very satisfied of the assurances that they have been given of the affection and protection that our Sovereign will give them at all times and of the fruitful reasons as to why they should offer us the Castle of San Marcos de Apalache, and to provide them with the Arms and Munitions that they ask for.

The expenditures caused by their [presence] in this City, the gifts they have been given and the Food which they were given for their trip back, amounts to 1103 pesos, 5 1/2 reales as it appears in the attached report presented by the cited Eligio de la Puente and I have ordered paid to the Treasury, without any explanation of the ends for which they have been invested and with only the title of “reserved expenditures” made by my disposition.

Overall, I beg Your Excellency that it would serve him to give account of this to His Majesty and secure for me his Royal approval.

Source: AGI Cuba 1164, f 246

Julián de Arriaga to the Governor of Havana, the Marquis de la Torre; Aranjuez, 6 May 1773

The King has taken account of Your representation (reserved) dated the 26 of last February, in which account is given of the arrival to the Port, in one of the Fishing Boats in the Keys immediate to the Province of Florida, fourteen Indians of the Uchiz Nation, who inhabit Cabeta, from the Point of Tanche up to the Santa Rosa, as chief Messenger Captains commissioned by their Emperor. They proposed the mode and means by which to recapture said Province and desired anxiously to commit to the Holy Faith. And what You did, Sir, despite the inconstant treachery of these People and the present harmony between the two Courts, in order not to discourage them, was to offer them, as always, the protection of His Majesty. He (the King) approves of this and orders that You, Sir, entertain and cultivate them without agreeing to their proposals.

Source: AGI Cuba 1212, f 206

Julián de Arriaga to the Governor of Havana Marquis de la Torre; Aranjuez, 20 May 1773

His Majesty has taken note of the letter sent by You, Sir, dated the 28th of March past and of the Notice which accompanies it from the Accountant don Juan Josef Eligio de la Puente, having [returned] to the Province of Cabeta the Uchiz Indian Messengers, who arrived at this Port with the pretensions that You, Sir, had earlier given Account of, satisfied with the protection that His Majesty dispenses at all times without agreeing to their offer of the Castle of San Marcos and having spent on their entertainment, maintenance and board 1103 peos and 5 1/2 reales, paid by the Treasury.

Source: AGI Cuba 1212, f 226

Juan Joseph Eligio de la Puente, Havana, 26 March 1774

Relation of six male Indians, two female Indians and a Child of the Uchiz Nation from the Province of Cabeta, who, in the Boat named Santiago owned by Antonio Baquero, traveled from the Tampa Bay to this City (Havana) on the afternoon of the 8th of the current month and set off to return there on the 26th of the same month, whose names and the expenses which they caused us due to the gifts which have been given them, maintenance during their residence here and food for their journey, as below; Juan Joseph Eligio de la Puente, Havana, 26 March 1774

Names of the Male Indians
The Cacique Sacubayqui
Ullaisqui
Sincoay
Yaabigi
Mumicu
Limaci

Females: Sacuique [and another Sacuique]
Child: Finaullaiche

Goods and effects which they have been given
1 white shirt at the cost of 3 pesos
5 said shirts at the cost of 10 reales each
16 1/2 varas of Blue Woolen Cloth, for Boots, loincloths and rags at the cost of 49 pesos, 4             reales
6 shaving Razors at the cost 1 peso, 7 reales
6 cutting Razors at the cost of 1 peso 4 reales
8 small Mirrors at the cost of 2 pesos 4 reales
8 pair of Scissors at the cost of 2 pesos
8 small ivory combs at the cost of 2 pesos, 4 reales
8 small wooden combs at the cost of 6 reales
6 ounces Vermilion at the cost of 1 peso, 4 reales
8 varas of painted canvas at the cost of 8 pesos
8 pieces of wool ribbon at the cost of 5 pesos
8 pieces of silk ribbon at the cost of 20 pesos
8 yarned handkerchiefs at the cost of 4 pesos
2 pesos worth of Glass Beads
2 pesos worth of white yarn
2 pesos worth of Tailoring yarn
1 peso worth of sewing Needles
2 pesos worth of Soap
4 small Barrels of Cane Brandy at the cost of 18 pesos
2 small Barrels of Honey at the cost of 7 pesos
12 Bunches of Tobacco at the cost of 3 pesos
4 arrobas of Ground Sugar at the cost of 6 pesos

Food for the journey
8 arrobas of Bizcocho at the cost of 24 pesos
8 arrobas of Rice at the cost of 16 pesos
4 arrobas of Beef Jerky at the cost of 12 pesos
2 arrobas of Pork Jerky at the coast of 9 pesos
1 fanega of Salt at the cost of 2 pesos 4 reales
4 pesos worth of Squash, Sweet Potatoes, Plantains and Cane

Maintenance during their residence in this City
51 pesos for the Maintenance of the six male Indians and two female Indians, to the respect of three reales per diem per head, beginning the 9th of March inclusive, when the Maintenance had begun to be administered, until the 26th of the same month exclusive, when they embarked.
12 pesos for the Rent of the house in which they lived during the stated period.

Total
281 pesos, 7 reales

Source: AGI Cuba 1218, f 615

Unknown author [probably the governor, the Marquis de la Torre] to Julián de Arriaga, Havana, 1 April 1774

Nine Indians of the Uchiz Nation, which inhabits the Province of Cabeta, came to this Port (Havana) from the Tampa Bay on the 8th of March past in a Boat which had traveled there (Tampa Bay) to fish. Their leader, called the Cacique Sacubayqui, had been given the task of renewing, in my presence and on behalf of his Nation, the fidelity and obedience which they maintain for the King (of Spain), our Master. Even though I suspect that those pronouncements had as their principal objective to enjoy the entertainments which we provide them, according to the established practice, I made a show of thanking them. I resolved on the hasty return of the Messengers in order to procure, as much as possible, the moderation of the gifts we which have become accustomed to give them and assured them of the benevolence and protection of our August Sovereign.

On the 26th of the same month of March, they boarded their Boat in order to return to their Province. The attached Relation manifests the expenditures made on their maintenance while they had remained in this Plaza, on the gifts which they had been given upon departure and on the food which they had been given for their journey. All of this adds up to the sum of 281 pesos seven reales, which quantity I have requested be disbursed by this General Treasury to Juan Josef Eligio de la Puente, the Accountant of the Tribunal of Accounts, who awaits it at my disposition, and was charged with, as on previous occasions, the care and dispatch of the Indians.

Desiring that these visits are not repeated due to the little fruit which has, in my opinion, been borne of them, I have determined to prevent the Boats from journeying to the coast of Florida, which I consider the best possible way to prevent them from having to take Indians on board while finding a pretext with which to hide my true intentions.

Source: AGI Cuba 1218, f 613

Julián de Arriaga to the Governor of Havana, Marquis de la Torre; Aranjuez, 21 June 1774

His Majesty approves of the the rebate which was manifested by You, Sir, in the Letter of the 1st of April past and was mandated by the Treasury to the sum of 281 pesos. The rebate was in relation to the subsistence and gifts given to the nine Uchiz Indians, who from the Province of Cabeta arrived at this Port (Havana) with the intention of ratifying their fidelity and obedience to this Crown and of the providence given to those Boats that travel to the Coast of Florida. They are excused from the transport of those People (the Uchiz Indians), as they did not have any other objective in mind than to enjoy the entertainments provided.

Source: AGI Cuba 1213, f 95

Julián de Arriaga to the Governor of Havana, Marquis de la Torre; El Pardo, 18 January 1775

By means of the letter which You, Sir, sent dated the 10th of November past, the King has taken account of the declaration of Juan Ledian, Captain of the Schooner San Vicente Ferrer, which carried to this City (Havana) fourteen Indian Messengers from the Talapuz Nation in the Province of San Agustín de la Florida, in regards to his motive in doing so, the expenditures of his coming and going, to the sum of 487 pesos and six reales. His Majesty approves of Your disposition and of the entertainments which allowed them to depart in contentment.

Source: AGI Cuba 1213, f 337

Julián de Arriaga to the Governor of Havana Marquis de la Torre; El Pardo, 12 February 1775

His Majesty has taken account of the letter sent by You, Sir, dated the 2nd of December past, which notes the return of the fourteen Indian Messengers of the Talapuz Nation, of which You spoke of as visiting on the 10th of [November] to that Port (Havana) due to bad weather, and the new expenditure of 100 pesos and five reales, due to their maintenance and board.

Source: AGI Cuba 1213, f 363

Rafael de la Luz, Havana, 16 February 1775

Relation of the expenditures made by my hand in virtue of the order of the Marquis de la Torre, Governor and Captain General, for the maintenance, Food and gifting of the Talapuz Indians that came from the Province of Florida on the 3rd of the current month and have left today; Rafael de la Luz, Havana, 16 February 1775

For 3 shirts at 10 reales each one, 3 pesos 6 reales
For 2 Sombreros and a handkerchief, 2 pesos 2 reales
For 3 small Mirrors, 6 reales
For Glass Beads, 1 peso
For 3 Barrels of Cane Brandy, 9 pesos
For 3 Barrels of Honey, 6 pesos
For a fanega of Corn, 3 pesos
For tobacco, 1 peso 2 reales
For 2 arrobas of Bizcocho, 5 pesos
For viandas and Cane, 4 pesos
For a fanega of Salt, 3 pesos 6 reales
For 3 arrobas of Corn, 4 pesos 2 reales
For 1 case of Casabe, 2 pesos 4 reales
For 1 arroba of beef, 2 pesos 4 reales
For 1/2 arroba of pork, 2 pesos
For the maintenance of said Indians from the 3rd to the 16th inclusive at the cost of 2 1/2 reales      per head (per diem), (for a total of) 13 pesos

Total
64 pesos

Source: AGI, Cuba 1220, f 247

Rafael de la Luz; Havana, 16 March 1775

Relation of the expenditures occasioned in the maintenance and gifts for thirty-four Indians from the Uchiz Nation of the Province of Florida that came on distinct dates, from the 16th of February and left the 15th of March; made by the Order of Marquis de la Torre, Governor and Captain General of this city and Island; Rafael de la Luz; Havana, 16 March 1775

Gifts made to the Cacique Escuchapé, his three children and Wives
For 8 white shirts, 12 pesos
For 6 yarned Handkerchiefs, 3 pesos
For 3 Pieces of Silk Ribbon, 6 pesos
For 6 Fresadas, 12 pesos
For a Barrel and a half of Wine, 19 pesos
For a pound of Vermilion, (broken)
For two Coffers with their Locks, 7 pesos
For 1500 nails of all ores, 20 pesos
For (broken) sombreros, (broken)
For 3 Barrels of Cane Brandy, 16 pesos
For a Silk Ceñidor, 2 pesos
For 3 Axes for working Wood, 5 pesos 2 reales
For 2 Suelas, one guriza, other plain, 3 pesos
For 6 Machetes, 6 pesos
For 4 Hand Drills, 6 reales
For 3 Brushes, 3 pesos
For 55 scissors, 10 pesos 2 reales
For 55 Knives, 10 pesos 2 reales
In cash to the Cacique and his children, 72 pesos
For 10 Barrels of Cane Brandy, for which Escuchapé asked for his troops that (broken), 30             pesos

Gifts for all
For 34 Shaving Razors, 8 pesos 4 reales
For 24 scissors, 6 pesos 3 reales
For 34 small cutting Razors, 6 pesos 3 reales
For 34 Link Chains, 6 pesos 3 reales
For 34 small Mirrors, 8 pesos 4 reales
For 34 Ivory Combs, 12 pesos 6 reales
For 7 dozen smoking Pipes, 3 pesos 4 reales
For 28 Barrels of Cane Brandy, 84 pesos
For 34 Barrels of Honey, 97 pesos
For 18 Bunches of tobacco, 45 pesos
For 2 dozen Knives, (broken)
For 34 Ordinary Soup Bowls, (broken)
For 7 pounds of Vermilion, 5 pesos 2 reales
For 2 pounds of Soap, (broken)
For 6 (broken) of Cloth, (broken)
For 6 Crystal glasses, (broken)
For 12 empty Bottles, 4 reales
For a small Barrel of Wine given to Captain Cayman of said Nation, 4 pesos 4 reales
For 2 fanegas of Salt in Bags, 7 pesos 4 reales
For the Glass Beads, 16 pesos 6 reales
For the composition [possibly for repair] of the Rifles that the Indians brought, 8 pesos
For 27 Shirts, 33 pesos 6 reales

Food for the journey to the Tampa Bay
For 18 arrobas (broken), 22 pesos 4 reales
For 10 of the same, 9 pesos
For 6 fanegas of Corn, 18 pesos
For sweet Cane, 6 pesos
For a fire pit which was created on the Boat, 6 pesos
For 4 Horse-loads of Firewood, 4 pesos
For 8 Loads of Casabe, 20 pesos
For 20 arrobas of Sugar, 4 pesos
For 5 Barrels of Cane Brandy, 15 pesos
For 5 Barrels of Honey, 14 pesos 3 reales
For 3 quintales of Bizcocho, 30 pesos
For Candles made of Animal Fat, 2 pesos
For Cloth Sacks and Cords, 6 pesos
For 10 empty sacks for vases for rations, 3 pesos 6 reales
For the maintenance of 14 Indians  from the (broken) until the 15th of March, at the cost of 2 1/2 reales (per diem) per head (for a total of 578 pesos 7 reales)
For the maintenance of 10 Indians, from the 6th of March until the 15th, at the cost of 2&1/2 reales (per diem) per head for a total of 32 pesos 6 reales  
For the maintenance of 10 Indians... [21 pesos, 7 reales]
For the gratification given to the Interpreter, 6 pesos
For 27 pesos paid to Antonio Lendian, who housed them in his home at the rate of one peso      per diem

Total
1,128 pesos 7 reales

Source: AGI, Cuba 1220, f 245-246

Don Rafael de la Luz, Interim Senior Assistant to the Plaza of Havana, 2 May 1775

I certify that the Indian Escuchape of the Uchiz Nation, Chief Cacique of Cabeta and its territories came to this Port on the day of the 17th of February of the current year in the Schooner in the care of Juan Ximénez, in the company of three children of the Cacique Yamicu and of the War Captains Tamiscu, Tamaslemiscu, Mazascu, Tamaslemisco and another thirty of their Nation. He (Escuchape) presented the following to the Governor and Captain General, by means of an Interpreter:

He said that, with the English having declared War, seven of his companions had been killed. Informing them of the entire Affair, (the Uchizes) claimed to have killed twenty-two English that were situated in Cabeta along with their shops and for this reason planned to spread their Establishment to the Tampa Bay. Due to all this, they pleaded to His Majesty that he help them under the concept of their pledging obedience to him, as previous Captains General had done in Florida. As verification, they displayed four Documents signed by Governors don Manuel Montiano, don Fulgencio García de Solis, don Francisco del Moral and don Melchor Feliu. Afterwards, they asked his Seniority (the Governor), to attend to them and recommend them to the Governor of New Orleans. They offered to negotiate with the Indians of the Talapuz Nation and the Choctaw so that they could had Peace with them and cease the war which has lasted ten months in that region, due to some hostilities which they had caused them. They concluded by saying that their intention was to settle in the said Tampa Bay with absolute obedience to His Majesty and maintain with this Island (Cuba) a reciprocal Trade of Pelts, Horses and other fruits that could be obtained there.

To all of this his Seniority responded, in the name of His Majesty, that he had taken account of this Solicitation and would raise it to his Sovereign comprehension so that he could figure out how to resolve the issue in the manner most convenient to the Royal Service. Meanwhile, he would write to the Governor of the said Province (New Orleans, or Louisiana), so that he could arrange for the peace that they planned to reestablish with the Talapuzes and Choctaw, giving them many thanks for their repeated demonstrations of obedience and fidelity to the King, Our Master, who not doubt would be very pleased with them. He warned them at the same time that it was not necessary to return there with similar solicitations, with respect to the two prior visits being sufficient to give notice of such. He well-established that no auxiliaries could be promised them for use against the English, due to the fact that they currently conserve with Us the most pacifistic correspondence.

The Indians took note of this response and appeared to be satisfied, pleading to his Seniority to bestow them the favors which, on other occasions, they have become accustomed to receive at the hand of the Spanish Governors; so that they could carry to their Country signs of their having earned acceptance of their solicitude, that their Nation continue to receive the protection which the King had always dispensed to them benignly; and to placate their companions who remain waiting impatiently on the Coast, not having been able to came due to a lack of Boats.

Source: AGI Cuba 1220, f 280-281

The Governor of Havana, Marquis de la Torre, to don Julián de Arriaga; Havana, 4 May 1775

My preparation and methods, designed to halt the frequent visits which the Indians of the Province of Florida have made to this port, have been useless. The Fishermen who travel to that coast are terrified of their threats and have seen it fit to carry thirty-seven of them (here) on distinct occasions, with the objective of giving complaints of the English and pleading for the protection of our sovereign, so that they can make war with them, form their establishments throughout the coast and, finally, so that they can solicit gifts and trinkets according to the practice to which they had been accustomed in Florida.

The Chief of the those Indians, named Escucahpé and representative for his people, has spoken for them all. In his long and inopportune conferences, he stated through lackluster Interpreters what we have manifested in the attached certification, in which Your Excellency will also see, if it pleases you, my response directed towards ending the housing of these unwelcome Guests, and making known to them that their Visits will be received poorly.

In the maintenance, food, and gifts for these Indians, despite having limited as much as had been possible the expenditures, they have consumed, as manifested in the attached accounts, 1192 pesos 7 reales, which quantity has been satisfied for the General Treasury, resulting in the notice which I passed on to the Intendant of the Army and Royal Estate.

All of the Indians left on the 15th of March past and, while they promised me that they would not return to this Port for a long time, twenty-four of them have entered (the port), and among them Escuchapé, saying that his Nation has obligated them to return here, so that they could deliver some positive resolutions. I have received them, displaying my displeasure, and have resolved not to administer more than precisely what they need for their subsistence. I will dispatch them without giving them even the slightest gift and will warn them expressly that if they repeat these trips once again, they will have to maintain themselves and their transport at their own cost. I will not take as of yet any strong measure, due to the necessity of placating them so that they will not impede our fishing on their coasts, which would cause great harm to this city, as I have manifested earlier.

Of all this, I beg Your Excellency that I would serve His Majesty to give account of this and communicate to him so that he can find it worthy to approve the payment mandated to be made by the Treasury. Meanwhile, I am sending the notice of the expenditure that is being made by the Indians currently in this Plaza, who ought to have left this past morning or will leave tomorrow.

 Source: AGI Cuba 1220, f 243-244

Rafael de la Luz, Havana, 10 May 1775

Relation of the expenditures caused in the Food and Daily (Maintenance) of the twenty-seven that arrived at this Port, two of them on the 17th of March and the other twenty-four on the 6th of April, and left on the 8th of the current (month), satisfying by my hand the order of the Governor and Captain General.

Expenditures
For 13 arrobas of Beef Jerky, 52 pesos 4 reales
For 4 arrobas of Pork Jerky, 16 pesos
For 10 arrobas of Rice, 12 pesos 4 reales
For 4 fanegas of Corn, 12 pesos
For 2 horse-loads of firewood, 2 pesos
For Viandas [rations of fruits and tubers-plantains and malangas, for example], 4 pesos 2 reales
For sweet Cane, 3 pesos
For 4 loads of casabe, 10 pesos
For 26 Barrels of Cane Brandy, 78 pesos
For 52 bunches of Tobacco, 13 pesos
For 2 quintales [Castillian form of measure, 46 kilograms] of Bizcocho, 20 pesos
For 10 Barrels of Honey, 40 pesos
For 1 small cauldron, 6 pesos
For a fire pit for the Boat, 6 pesos
For 4 fanegas of Salt, 10 pesos
For Candles made of Animal Fat, 1 peso
In cash for various small expenditures, 7 pesos
For the assembly of two rifles, 4 pesos
For the Gratification of the Interpreter, 6 pesos
For 25 pesos to Antonio Lendian who housed them in his residence
For the maintenance of the two Talapuz Indians that came on the 17th of March and left on the 8th of May, at the cost of 2 1/2 reales (per diem) per head, (for a total of) 32 pesos 4 reales
For the maintenance of the twenty-four Uchiz Indians that came on the 6th of April and left on the 8th of May, at the cost of 2 1/2 reales (per diem) per head, (for a total of) 240 pesos

Food for the Boat, with no other purpose than to carry the Indians
For 2 arrobas of Pork Jerky, 8 pesos
For 2 arrobas of Rice, 5 pesos
For 2 fanegas of Corn, 6 pesos
For Viandas, 2 pesos
For sweet cane, 1 peso
For 2 loads of Casabe, 5 pesos
Total
607 pesos 6 reales

Source: AGI Cuba 1220, f 282

Julián de Arriaga to the Governor of Havana Marquis de la Torre; San Ildefonso, 1 August 1775

By means of the letter sent by You, Sir, dated the 1st of June past, the King has taken into account the 607 pesos and six reales to which the expenditures due to maintenance and board have ascended, as they were provided for the return the 26 Indians of the Uchiz Nation that were of late in that Plaza [Havana], as it appears according to the accompanying Relation.

Source: AGI Cuba 1213, f 526

Don Rafael de la Luz, Captain of the Infantry and Senior Assistant of this Plaza; Havana, 2 August 1775

I certify that Juan Lendian who, with the Schooner of his charge named San Vicente Ferrer, left to Fish in the Keys of the North and coast of Florida, returned to this Port on the 15th of July and brought aboard an Indian of the Uchiz Nation from the Town of Agechiti, saying that he had arrived at the Apalache Coast with the design of taking the land for the Indian Escuchapé and those who accompanied him, who left this Port at the disposition of the Government. Many of those Natives congregated and, not content with carrying out various tasks for the Governor and Captain General directed towards the preparation of the commerce between this Port and those Countries, obliged him to receive the Indian aboard, who, for being one of the chiefs of his Nation, was sent to discuss the same matter. And with said Indian having been presented before the Governor, he espoused through the Interpreter Miguel Joseph Gorrero, Citizen of Guanabacoa, that he came on behalf of his entire Nation to renew the loyalty and love which they hold for the King of Spain and all of his vassals, and to manifest that with them, and not the English, they wanted to maintain communication and commerce. To this end they pleaded to the Governor to provide a Boat that they themselves would [navigate], and which value would be paid for with the goods they would bring from their coasts to sell here. The government would allow the boats to exit from this Port, carrying the goods and effects that they would consume, in order to exchange them there for horses, Bulls, Pelts and other species of which they had in abundance. The Governor responded to this, through the same Interpreter, that although he could not give them the Boat that they asked for, he would procure the preparation of the Commerce that they desire, providing them on their own Coasts with what they needed in exchange for the effects that are produced in that Country and are valued here. At the same time, he assured those of his (the Indian’s) Nation of the benevolence that they will always find in the pious heart of the King of Spain....

Source: AGI Cuba 1220, f 487-488

Rafael de la Luz; Havana, 12 September 1775

Notice of the Expenditures that have been occasioned by the Uchiz Indian who arrived at this Port on the 16th of June and left on the 16th of August of the current year, which, in virtue of the Order of the Marquis de la Torre, Governor and Captain General of this City and Island, were made by my hand.

Food and Gifts
For 1 Barrel of Cane Brandy, 4 pesos 4 reales
For 1 Barrel of Honey, 3 pesos
For 1 fanega of Corn, 2 pesos
For 1 arroba de Rice, 1 peso 4 reales
For 1 arroba of jerky, 3 pesos 2 reales
For Cookies and Viandas, 6 reales
For 2 Bunches of Tobacco, 6 reales
For 1 Shirt, 1 peso, 4 reales
For 1 Sombrero, 1 peso 4 reales
For 1 Vara of Cloth, 4 pesos
For 1 Barrel of Cane Brandy for the Cacique Escuchapé, 3 pesos
For the maintenance of 60 days to the sum of 2 1/2 reales paid to Antonio Lendian, 18 pesos 6 reales

Total
52 pesos 6 reales

Source: AGI Cuba 1220, f 490

Unknown writer [probably the Marquis de la Torre] to Julián de Arriaga; Havana, 28 September 1775

The same Boat which [carried] the Uchiz Indians to the coast of Apalache, of which I spoke to Your Excellency in my Representations of the 4th of May past and the 1st of June past, returned to bring another [Indian] with the recommendation of being one of the chiefs of those Provinces, who sent him with a new commission to deal with me about important matters. The Captain of the Boat assured me that, although he wanted to deny them [permission] to board as commanded by his orders, he was pressured to receive him by the crowd of Natives that congregated at the reception of the cacique Escuchapé, who he carried to this post.

The message of this Indian is, as it seems according to the certification that I am including, is similar to the message of the previous ones: he came to give many complaints of the English and assure that they [the Uchiz] desire communication and trade with the Spaniards. However, he added, with great efficacy, an offer to prove his worth with the effects that they would bring from their Coasts in order to sell them here. In addition, the government would allow the boats to exit from this Port that would carry the goods and effects which they consume in order to trade for horses, Bulls, Pelts and other species that abound there.

Rejecting the proposition to the give those Indians a Boat so that they could [navigate] it themselves, I told the Messenger that I would procure the effects which they consume to be carried to their Country, so that they could acquire them without having to travel. With this hope, I dispatched them in a Fishing boat on the 16th of August past, having spent on the maintenance on this Indian while he was here and on the Food that he was given for his return 52 pesos 6 reales, which are recorded in the attached account. I have decided to satisfy these expenses from the General treasury of the Army and Royal Estate, hoping that his Majesty would approve.

Not forgetting the solicitude of the Indians, he asked me for permission to make a trip to the Coast of Apalache and Pensacola, carrying various Goods that had value amongst them, in order to trade them for Horses and effects. The thought seemed useful to me, since I noticed no inconvenience in its practice. I consider it rather advantageous to our commerce the extraction of the goods that the Indians desire to offer and desirable for this City the introduction of Horses, Bulls, Jerky, and pelts that are the benefit which they offer. (However,) I wanted to hear the report of the Intendant of the Army and the Royal Estate.

This Ministry fears that in the practice of this idea harmful consequences [would be the result, because], the English have establishments on the coasts of Apalache and Pensacola. Our Boats, with the pretext of conducting commerce with the Indians, would do so with them (the English) as well, carrying money and goods from this Island and taking their goods. Such misgivings induced the experience of the vehement inclination that attracted those natives to contraband and to trade with Foreigners. But to me it seems that such suspicions are, on this Occasion, borne of the jealousy of the Intendant and are not sufficient to reject the obviously useful project of trading with the Indians. The effects that would be received could not be mistaken for those which the English would provide: the horses, pelts and meats are not goods that would be available to buy in the English establishments. Moreover, to gain access to them, our Boats would not need to assume the pretext of trading with the Indians, since the motive of fishing drives them daily to the coasts of Apalache and Pensacola.

Despite these reflections, which for me dispel the fears which grip the Indentant, I have denied the license that they have asked of me, (which is) to send good to the Indians. Nevertheless, it is of little importance, as is manifested in the Relation, of which accompanies (this letter) a copy, which was presented to me. Neither will I give the license until His Majesty, in light of this Representation, which I beg Your Excellency that it would serve him to make it present to him, decides as to what would be of his Sovereign liking. In the concept of the traffic which the Indians solicit and to which I am inclined, one of the advantages will be the termination of their frequent visits, which do not cease to be costly to the Royal Estate.

Source: AGI Cuba 1220, f 491-492

Julián de Arriaga to the Governor of Havana, Marquis de la Torre; San Lorenzo, 14 October 1775

The King has taken into account, by means of the letter sent by You, Sir, dated the 4th of March past, the continued Visits made by the Floridian Indians, especially by those situated in Cabeta, with the pretext of pledging obedience and establishing a reciprocal Trade in Pelts and fruits on that Island [Cuba]. However, it is not this which motivates them, but the gifts that we entertain them with. In light of this intelligence, you were disposed to only give them what was necessary warning them that if they returned once again, they would have to maintain themselves at their own cost, without daring to taking a stronger action (or to be precise, while still putting up with them), so that they do not impede our fishing on their Coasts. His Majesty has approved of what You have done in the matter and desires that, without exasperating them, you find a way to moderate the repetition of their Visits, which would be the best way to curtail the entertainment expenses.

Source: AGI Cuba 1213, f 578

Governor of Havana Marquis de la Torre to Julián de Arriaga; Havana, 7 January 1776

Giving account of the sentence that has been pronounced against don Nicolás and don Pedro Villavicencio for the death by hanging...of the Indian Vicente Domínguez.

In the month of April this past year, a Warden of the Holy Brotherhood of this City named don Nicolás Villavicencio committed the most grievous crime of giving death by hanging to Vicente Domínguez, Indian that inhabited the Sartido of Santa Cruz de los Pinos, given by motive of having failed to show proper respect and having taken up arms against him. He proceeded to this atrocious execution within seven hours, without summary precedent, confession nor audience, (all of which are) indispensable to the charges of a crime, by which the Laws avoid meting out punishment until the final appeal. This act filled the entire Town with horror and scandal; and I, for your satisfaction, contributed from the beginning to the Case against said Warden, placing him in the narrow confines of prison.

I took the same providence against don Pedro Villavicencio, Brother of the Warden and Second Lieutenant of the Regiment of Calvary Militia of this Plaza, for having given motive, influence and instigation to such a detestable act, as it was borne of the imprudent demands which he made to Domínguez for the contribution of the Tithe of Watermelons and Melons, which is not to be practiced by that Party, (as) that all such Gains are borne of the components of the (Royal) Estate. Some other expressions that gave cause were added, including when his Brother the Warden neared the same Domínguez and struck him with his hand in order to remove his hat, with which action the lack of respect and use of arms was provoked, which motivated his quick and cruel death.

Continuing against the two Brothers the process for all transgressions of the Law, I have pronounced a sentence condemning the Warden to the inability to obtain employment of office in the administration of Justice, ten years of banishment to be completed in the Castle of San Juan de Ulloa, perpetual estrangement from the Island and a 200 peso fine. The fine will be applied in three nearly equal parts to the Legislature, expenses of justice and suffrages for the soul of the cited Vicente Domínguez. (Punishment will go) to the Second Lieutenant of the Militia in suspension of his position with the reservation to give count to His Majesty in (the form of) four years of banishment from the Jurisdiction of this City and in another 200 peso fine, with the same application as accords the testimony that I include in the previously mentioned sentence.

I beg Your Excellency that by giving account to His Majesty of this knowledge, it would [clarify] that I only suspended the referred don Pedro Villavicencio from his job as Second Lieutenant of the Militia. It did not occur to me that he deserved to remain entirely deprived from the satisfaction of public vindication, as this citizen will never be able to look at him with attributing to him the horror, in which he had no less part than his brother, in the unjust death of the Indian Domínguez. Neither will he be promised a reprieve from the righteousness of His Majesty for the most grievous crime which he committed.

Source: AGI Cuba 1221, f 137-138

Don Rafael de la Luz, rank of  Infantry Captain of the Royal Armies and senior Assistant of the Plaza of Havana; Havana, 14 January 1776

I certify that the Indian Fichacgé of the Uchiz Nation, who claimed to be Cacique of 29 large Towns and some small ones, came to this Port on the 12th of January of the current year in the Schooner at the charge of Juan Lendian, along with 10 of his Nation. Presented to the Governor and Captain General, he said [the following] by means of Interpreter:

That he offered himself to the King, along with all the Towns of his Jurisdiction, for whatever ends for which His Majesty would like to employ them, and in particular against the English which are found established in Florida and Pensacola, whom sustain the War that they have unjustly declared, cutting off the (lines of) communication and commerce that they had shared. As a result, they lacked many of the things which they needed and of the means to sell their wares. For this motive they begged [the Governor] to provide them with suitable Boats for the purpose of bringing to this City horses, Deer Pelts and other Goods which abound in their Lands so that, by means of their product, they could be provided with clothing, Tools, and other necessities which, due to their unhappiness, their Towns lacked.

That they offered to the Governor and Captain General to protect and defend the Spanish Boats that engage in the fishing of that Coast, along with the [ships] which, blown off course, sail into them. To this effect, he and his ally Escuchapé, Cacique of the Province of Cabeta, had ordered the establishment of many Towns in the area surrounding said coast, with the purpose of providing them [the Spanish fishing boats and ships wrecked on the coast] with food and other articles that their Territories produced.

That, equally, he made present to his seniority [the governor] that both he and Escuchapé had manifested towards their respective Nations the good tidings of the General of Havana in the past year. For this purpose, all the people of his Nation joined together in the major Towns to celebrate with Public parties, confident that they will be protected by the King of Spain. And in that respect, he expressed the urgency in which they are currently found. He begged him [the governor] to aid him in the same manner in which, on other occasions, the Governors of Florida and of this Plaza [Havana] had deemed necessary.

And in order to serve testimony to his Country of having merited acceptance of his solicitation and that his Nation continues to receive the protection which in all times the King has benignly dispensed to them, if it would become [the governor] to order that they be given goods as (had been done with) Escuchapé and the others that had come (to Havana) previously.

To all of this, the governor answered that he had taken note of his Solicitation, which he would elevate to his sovereign comprehension [notify the King] so that he could determine how to resolve the matter in the manner most convenient to his royal Service. He gave them many thanks for their repeated demonstrations of obedience and fidelity to the King, Our Master, and for the protection which they offered to give to the Spanish Boats which fish on their coast, as well as to those which are lost there, which he had effectively recommended.

He informed them that it was not necessary to return again with similar solicitudes, to the respect that they had already made it present, on various occasions, and that they (the Uchiz) understood that no auxiliaries could be currently provided against the English, because they conserve with them the most peaceful correspondence. And as to the Gifts which they asked for and the food necessary for their return, he would immediately give them what he prudently considered indispensable. Of all this, the expressed Indian Fichacgé remained informed and, according to his expressions, satisfied....

Source: AGI Cuba 1221, f 316-317

Rafael de la Luz, Havana, 12 February

Relation of the expenditures occasioned in Food and Daily (Maintenance) of the 11 Uchiz Indians that arrived at this Port on the 20th of January and left the 8th of February, satisfying by my hand the order of the Governor and Captain General.

For 10 Shirts, 12 pesos 4 reales
For 1 White Shirt, 1 peso 4 reales
For 6 pounds of Vermilion, 6 pesos
For 12 pair Scissors, 1 peso 4 reales
For 12 shaving razors, 3 pesos
For 12 ivory Combs, 4 pesos 4 reales
For 12 Mirrors, 3 pesos
For 12 Handkerchiefs, 4 pesos 6 reales
For 12 Bunches of Tobacco, 3 pesos
For 10 Barrels of Cane Brandy, 40 pesos
For 1 Barrel of Cargo, 8 pesos
For 1 Barrel of Wine, 8 pesos
For 10 (Barrels) of Cane Honey, 30 pesos
For 1 Barrel of Cargo, 7 pesos
For the accounts, worked glass, 2 pesos
For 10 sombreros, 10 pesos
For 1 sombrero more finely made, 2 pesos, 4 reales
For 12 pieces of ribbon, 12 pesos

Food
For 2 Fanegas of Salt with their sacks, 5 pesos 6 reales
For 6 arrobas of Beef Jerky, 12 pesos
For 2 arrobas of Pork Jerky, 6 pesos
For 5 arrobas of Corn, 6 pesos 2 reales
For 2 Horse-loads of Firewood, 1 peso 4 reales
Of Viandas and sweet Cane, 5 pesos
For 2 Loads of Casabe, 5 pesos
For 1 quintal of Cookies, 9 pesos
For 1 fresada or Manta, 2 pesos
In cash, 3 pesos

For the freight to carry and bring them the Gifts, 2 pesos
For the Maintenance of them for the twenty days that they resided here to the sum of 2 1/2 reales per head (per diem), (for a total of) 68 pesos 6 reales
For 15 pesos of gratification that were given to Antonio Lendian, who assisted them and housed them in his home.

Total
308 pesos 4 reales

Source: AGI Cuba 1221, f 313

Rafael de la Luz, 28 February 1776

Relation of the expenditures Caused in Food, y Daily (Maintenance) of the 28 Uchiz Indians that arrived at this Port, thirteen of them on the 13th of February and the rest on the 15th, and left the 26th of the same (month), satisfied by my hand by Order of the Governor and Captain General.

For 28 shirts, 25 pesos
For 28 Barrels of Cane Brandy, 98 pesos
For 14 (Barrels) of Honey (Brandy), 42 pesos
For 10 pounds of Vermilion, 10 pesos
For 36 bunches of Tobacco, 9 pesos
For 14 arrobas of Beef Jerky, 28 pesos
For 7 arrobas of Pork Jerky, 21 pesos
For 8 arrobas of Rice, 10 pesos
For 2 quintales of Cookies, 18 pesos
For Cane and Viandas, 6 pesos
For 4 Loads of Casabe, 10 pesos
For 4 Fanegas of Corn, 16 pesos
For 2 Horses of Fire Wood, 1 peso 4 reales 1/2 maravedi
For 1 Barrel of Honey for the Journey, 6 pesos
For the maintenance of the first 13 Indians in the 14 days that they resided here, at the cost of 2 1/2 reales (per diem) per head, (for a total cost of) 56 pesos 7 reales
For the maintenance of the other 15 Indians in the 12 days that they resided here, at the cost of 2 1/2 reales (per diem) per head, (for a total cost of) 56 pesos 2 reales
For 13 pesos of gratification that were given to Antonio Lendian for having assisted and housed them in his House, 13 pesos

Total
436 pesos 5 reales

Source: AGI Cuba 1221, f 314

Rafael de la Luz; Havana, 15 March 1776

Relation of the expenditures Caused in Food and Daily (Maintenance) of the 20 Uchiz Indians that arrived at this Port on the 2nd of March and left the 14th of the same (month), satisfying by my hand the order of the Governor and Captain General.

For 8 arrobas of Beef Jerky, 16 pesos
For 4 arrobas of Pork Jerky, 12 pesos
For 20 Barrels of Cane Brandy, 60 pesos
For 10 Barrels of Honey, 30 pesos
For 20 Bunches of Tobacco, 5 pesos
For 6 arrobas of Rice, 16 pesos
For 4 Fanegas of Corn, 16 pesos
For cane and viandas, 4 pesos
For 2 quintales of Cookies, 18 pesos
For 2 loads of Casabe, 5 pesos
For 2 horses of fire wood, 1 peso 4 reales
For 4 pounds of Vermilion, 4 pesos
For the maintenance of them (the 20 Uchiz) in the 12 days that they resided here at the sum of 2 reales (per diem) per head, (for a total of) 60 pesos
For two pesos in cash, 2 pesos
For 12 pesos of gratification that were given to Antonio Lendian for having assisted and housed them in his House, 12 pesos

Total
254 pesos 4 reales

Source: AGI Cuba 1221, f 315

Governor of Havana, Marquis de la Torre to José de Gálvez; Havana, 11 April 1776

In the first few months of this year, three groups of Indians of the Uchiz Nation that inhabit the Coasts of Florida have come here. The Fishers who travel there from this port, despite the repeated order that they not bring such guests, can not avoid them because they conglomerate in such numbers on the Beaches and on board the Boats by way of their Canoes and oblige them to admit them and transport them, always claiming that they have grave matters to discuss with the General of Havana.

The chief Messenger of those who have come this year has been an Indian called Fitchgé and his commission has not differed, as manifested in the accompanying certification, from that which the other have brought in previous years and which I have related via notices. He reduces himself to ratify the love and loyalty that they conserve for our sovereign; to complain of the English, assuring us that San Agustín and Pensacola are ill-regarded in their community; to solicit auxiliaries for making war; and to ask with much insistence that they be provided with the means to maintain commerce with Us on their coasts, so that they can obtain various effects which they need and expend the goods that their country produces and which have value in ours.

My response, the same as what I have given on other occasions, is that we are awaiting orders as regards the commerce that they wish to establish, (while) disabusing them of obtaining at this moment auxiliaries against the English, due to the peace and harmony that reigns between the two Nations. I beg Your Superior Intelligence [the governor] to keep in mind my representation of the 29th of September past, Number 954, and that it would serve to communicate to me if it will be to the liking of His Majesty that some Boats of ours go to the coasts of Florida to trade with the Indians. By such means, in which I see no inconvenience and some possible advantages, we would rid ourselves of their frequent and costly visits and would conserve their correspondence and friendship, for in some event it could become convenient.

In the maintenance, food and indispensable gifts for the expressed three Groups of Indians, 999 pesos 5 reales have been spent and such quantity has been satisfied by the General Treasury of the Army and Royal Estate, in virtue of the notice that I passed to the Intendant, in hope of His Majesty’s approval.

Source: AGI Cuba 1221, f 311

Unknown author [probably the Governor of Havana, Marquis de la Torre], to Julián de Arriaga; Havana, 1 June 1776

In the letter of the 4th of the past (month), giving account to Your Excellency of the arrival at this Port of some Indians of the Uchiz Nation, and of the manner in which they were dispatched, I also said that twenty-one of them had returned once again. Warning them seriously to not repeat the trips so that they would not have to maintain themselves at their own cost, it seemed pertinent to administer the funds necessary for their subsistence in this and in the food which they were provided for their return, as was done for the other two that stayed here beginning on the 17th of March. They spent, as is manifested in the attached account, 607 pesos and six reales, which quantity, in virtue of the notice that I gave to the intendant of the army and Royal Treasury, has been paid by this General Treasury....

Source: AGI Cuba 1220, f 278-279

Effects that have been carried to the Uchiz Indians; Antonio Ramón Basque; unknown date or location

15 Barrels of Cane Brandy
6 Fanegas of Salt
10 Fanegas of Corn
8 arrobas of Rice
2 quintales of Cookies
One Barrel of White Wine
One Barrel of Honey
30 bunches of tobacco
4 pounds of finely (ground) Vermilion
100 pounds of Gunpowder for Small Arms
100 pounds of Balls for Small Arms
24 varas of colored Cloth
36 Shirts
6 Fresadas
3 Silk Ceñidores
6 pieces of inferior grade colored Silk Ribbon
36 Mirrors
36 knives
36 shaving Razors
36 Combs for cleansing wool or silk

Source: AGI Cuba 1220, f 489

1st Memorial; unknown date, author, unknown location

Doña María and doña Nicolasa Medrano are natives of Florida and legitimate children of the Second Lieutenant of the Infantry don Blas Medrano, who died in service there. However, thirty-five years prior to the transfer of said Provinces to the British Crown, they came to this City, where they have lived ever since, have married and are now Widowed. As is the intention of the King, and of his pious Alms for the Families of Florida, they should only be distributed to those who left due to the cessation of those Provinces to England, following the Catholic Flag. It seems clear that the expressed doña María and doña Nicolasa Medrano have no place in receiving the stated Alms.

2nd Memorial

Doña María and doña Nicolasa Medrano, of the families of the Precinct of Florida, Legitimate Children of the Second Lieutenant don Blas Medrano, who served Your Majesty in said Plaza for 32 years and eight Months until he died of a Mortal wound in the Enemy camp, as is accredited by the Evidence presented here. His Majesty has been supporting them, from the Royal Accountancy of Havana, with two reales each per diem, in conformity with what the Royal orders provide, for the alleviation of their expressed families. The said daily allotment has been suspended for the Applicants, with the motive that they were not Present on the Transports to this Plaza, evacuating when it (Province of Florida) was turned over to the British Crown, for being, prior to this event and in pursuit of their health, in this City, with the License that the Captaincy General permitted them. In light of such, due to their Poverty, they plea to the Royal Graces of Your Majesty so that, if his Piety deem it Worthy, with attention to the short Merits of their Father, whose Loyalty ultimately cost him his Life and spilled his blood, to his very last breath displaying his love, Valor and Conduct. The Applicants ask this favor of the competent Dispatch, so that they are contributed this per diem Allotment for the duration of their lives and also that they be redeemed what has not been given to them due to their exclusion from the Grace of the Sovereign Intentions, that they hope to be Restituted and that they will receive your Mercy.

Source: AGI Cuba 1211, f 318-319