The 34thUnited States Colored Infantry Regiment

Company A
Company D
Company E
Company F
Company K

34th Regiment, Company A

Name, Age, Hometown?

Rank, In/Out

Height/Complexion/Eyes/Hair

Muster Date/Location/ Recruiter?

Occupation

Adams, Domingo

16, Key West

Private/

Musician

5ft 5in, black, black, black

02/09/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Waiter

Alberts, William

19, Lake City

Private/Private

5ft 11in, black, dark, black

03/25/1863

Jacksonville,

Carver

Servant

Brisbon, Simon P.1

35, Key West

Corporal/

Sergeant

5ft 8in, black, black, black

02/10/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Boston, Peter

26, ?

Private/Private

5ft 7in, black, black, black

02/15/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Braddock, Francis2

18, Fernandina

 

5ft 5in, dark, black, black

03/20/1863

Jacksonville,

Montgomery

Cook

Bradon, Robert

19, Tallahassee

Private/Private

5ft 8in, gray, black, light

03/11/1864

Jacksonville,

Carver

Laborer

Cummings, Horace

18, Nashua

Private/Private

5ft 7in, black, black, black

03/25/1864

Jacksonville,

Carver

Servant

Dennis, Raphael3

30, Tomoka

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

02/10/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Dunham, Benjamin4

35, Tomoka

Private/

Corporal

5ft 6in, black, black, black

03/11/1863

Jacksonville,

Montgomery

Laborer

Fields, Joseph

20, Fernandina

Private/Private

5ft 6in, dark, black, black

09/15/1863

Morris,

?

Laborer

Franklin, Frank5

23, Pensacola

Private/

Corporal

5ft 7in, mulatto, black, black

02/19/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Gabriel, Samuel

25, St. Augustine

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

03/18/1863

Jacksonville,

Montgomery

Laborer

Garvin, George

45, St. Augustine

Sergeant/

Hospital Steward

6ft, mulatto, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Carpenter

Gilbert, Edmond

24, St. Augustine

Private/Private

5ft 8in, mulatto, black, black

02/15/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Hancock, William6

32, St. Augustine

Corporal/

Sergeant

5ft 6in, mulatto, brown, black

03/15/1863

Jacksonville,

Montgomery

Laborer

Hagerman, Joshua

29, Fernandina

Private/Private

5ft 5in, mulatto, black, black

03/05/1863

Beaufort,

Montgomery

Laborer

Harmon, Morris

30, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

03/15/1863

Jacksonville,

Montgomery

Laborer

Jackson, Andrew

18, Caleridge

Private/Private

5ft 7.5in, black, black, black

03/25/1864

Jacksonville,

Carver

Servant

Johnson, George7

17, Key West

Private/

Corporal

5ft 5in, mulatto, gray, black

02/11/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Jones, Joshua

19, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 7in, mulatto, black, black

02/10/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Lewis, John8

36, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 5in, black, black, black

02/10/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Lake, Raford

20, ?

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

03/15/1863

Jacksonville,

Montgomery

Laborer

Matthews, David

20, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 8in, black, black, black

02/09/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Matthews, John

18, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 8in, black, black, black

02/09/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Newton, Oliver

21, Pensacola

Private/Private

5ft 4in, mulatto, black, black

02/10/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Rogers, Samuel

21, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 4in, black, black, black

02/11/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Roberts, James9

17, Key West

Sergeant/

First Sergeant

5ft 3in, mulatto, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Salina, Frank10

24, St. Augustine

Sergeant/

Sergeant

5ft 7in, mulatto, black, black

02/11/1863

Key West

Laborer

Sanders, William11

22, St. Augustine

Private/Private

5ft 2in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Thomas, David12

18, Key West

Private/

Corporal

5ft 8in, black, black, black

02/18/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Thomas, John

18, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 8in, black, black, black

02/18/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Thomas, Joseph13

23, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 8in, black, black, black

02/17/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

 

Washington, George

24, St. Augustine

Private/Private

5ft 4in, black, black, black

02/10/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Williams, Charles

18, St. Augustine

Private/

Musician

5ft 2in, light, brown, brown

02/10/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Williams, Loop

35, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 8in, mulatto, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Williams, William14

23, St. Augustine

Sergeant/

Sergeant

5ft 9in, light, black, black

02/13/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Wilmer, Charles

16, St. Augustine

Private/

Corporal

5ft 4in, mulatto, black, black

02/10/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

34th Regiment, Company B

Name, Age, Hometown?

Rank, In/Out

Height/Complexion/Eyes/Hair

Muster Date/Location/ Recruiter?

Occupation

Addison, George15

41, St. Augustine

Corporal/

Private

5ft 7in, mulatto, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Carpenter

Addison, John16

15, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Albrus, Masseline17

28, St. Augustine

Corporal/

Sergeant

5ft 5in, black, black, black

04/16/1865

Beaufort,

Apthorp

Carpenter

Allen, Richard

29, Key West

Private/

Corporal

5ft 10in, black, black, black

02/13/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Bram, Anthony

24, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

03/17/1863

Jacksonville,

Apthorp

Laborer

Bram, Boston

26, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 7in, black, black, black

03/17/1863

Beaufort,

Apthorp

Laborer

Bram, Stephen

19, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

04/08/1863

Beaufort,

Apthorp

Laborer

Browne, Jacob18

18, ?

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

03/01/1864

Jacksonville,

Carver

Servant

Bulmer, John19

29, Jacksonville

Sergeant/

Sergeant

6ft, mulatto, black, black

02/11/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Carpenter

Cosciusko, William20

17, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 4in, mulatto, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Cryer, Andrew21

20, St. Augustine

Sergeant/

Private

5ft 3in, black, black, black

02/15/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Darling, Thomas

34, St. Augustine

Corporal/

Sergeant

5ft 6in, black, black, black

03/01/1864

Jacksonville,

Carver

Farmer

Delancey, Charles22

16, Key West

Private/

Musician

5ft 5in, mulatto, gray, light

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Delancey, James23

19, Key West

Sergeant/

Corporal

5ft 8in, black, black, black

02/11/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Farmer

Delancey, John24

21, Key West

Corporal/

Sergeant

5ft 7in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Farmer

Fairshaw, Adam25

28, St. Augustine

Private/Private

5ft 5in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Forrester, Amos

20, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 8in, black, black, black

03/17/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Forrester, Andrew

19, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

03/17/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Forrester, Edward26

22, Jacksonville

Private/

Corporal

5ft 7in, black, black, black

03/17/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Harrison, Primus

35, Tallahassee

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Hart, William27

?, Key West

?/

Quartermaster

Sergeant

5ft 8in, mulatto, dark, dark

02/11/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Henry, Charles

23, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 4in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Houston, James28

23, Fernandina

Private/Private

5ft 5in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

James, Allen29

22, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 8in, black, black, black

03/17/1863

Jacksonville,

Apthorp

Laborer

Jones, Daniel

19, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Leonard, James

23, Key West

?/Private

5ft 5in, black, black, black

03/01/1864

Jacksonville,

Carver

Laborer

Lewis, April30

18, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 5in, black, black, black

02/19/1863

Jacksonville,

Carver

Servant

Lewis, John31

16, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 1in, black, black, black

02/13/1863

Jacksonville,

Carver

Laborer

Lewis, William32

19, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

02/13/1863

Jacksonville,

Carver

Driver

Matthews, Samuel

19, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 3in, black, black, black

02/10/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Mickens, James33

28, Tallahassee

Private/?

5ft 4in, mulatto, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Morris, William34

21, Key West

?/Corporal

5ft 4in, black, black, black

02/15/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Carpenter

Murray, Benjamin

21, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 4in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Murray, Jones

16, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 4in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Laborer

Payne, Simon

18, Suwanne

Private/Private

5ft 5in, black, black, black

03/01/1864

Jacksonville,

Carver

Servant

Post, Francis

16, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 8in, mulatto, black, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Servant

Richardson, Andrew

24, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 5in, black, black, black

04/05/1863

Hilton Head,

Apthorp

Laborer

Robertson, Robert

25, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 5in, black, black, black

04/05/1863

Hilton Head,

Apthorp

Laborer

Stevens, Joseph35

23, St. Augustine

Sergeant/

Corporal

5ft 6in, mulatto, light, black

02/12/1863

Key West,

Montgomery

Carpenter

Washington, Benjamin36

18, Key West

Private/

Musician

5ft 2in, black, black, black

02/11/1863

Jacksonville,

Carver

Servant

Williams, Benjamin37

28, Duval County

Sergeant/

Private

5ft 8in, black, black, black

02/18/1863

Jacksonville,

Carver

Engineer

Williams, Henry        

Williams, James

20, St. Augustine

Private/Private

5ft 10in, mulatto, black, black

02/12/1863

Jacksonville, Carver

Laborer

Worthy, Morris

25, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 3in, black, black, black

02/12/1863

Jacksonville, Carver

Laborer

34th Regiment, Company C

Name, Age, Hometown?

Rank, In/Out

Height/Complexion/Eyes/Hair

Muster Date/Location/ Recruiter?

Occupation

Smiley, George

25, Suannee

Private/Private

5ft 8in, black, black, black

12/23/1864

Hilton Head,

Davis

Farmer

34th Regiment, Company D

Name, Age, Hometown?

Rank, In/Out

Height/Complexion/Eyes/Hair

Muster Date/Location/ Recruiter?

Occupation

Abbott, Samuel38

17, Fernandina

Private/

Corporal

5ft 7in, white, black, black

02/25/1864

Fernandina,

Davis

Servant

Acosta, Cato39

29, ?

Private/Private

5ft 7.5in, black, black, black

03/26/1864

Fernandina,

Davis

Lumberman

Brown, Peter

28, ?

Private/

Corporal

5ft 7.5in, black, black, black

03/21/1864

Fernandina,

Davis

Sawyer

Christopher, John H.40

24, Jacksonville

Private/

Corporal

5ft 4.5in, light, black, black

03/21/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

Bartender

Edwards, Marshal

16, ?

Private/Private

5ft 4.5in, black, hazel, black

04/08/1864

St. Augustine,

Bower

Farmer

English, Adam

38, ?

Private/Private

5ft 11.5in, black, black, black

03/25/1864

Fernandina,

Davis

Servant

Holzendorf, Thomas

28, ?

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

03/29/1864

Fernandina,

Davis

Shoemaker

Knob, Israel

16, ?

Private/?

5ft 4.5in, black, black, black

03/29/1864

Fernandina,

Davis

Farmer

Rivers, Joseph

45, ?

Private/Private

6ft 1in, black, black, black

03/22/1864

Fernandina,

Davis

Teamster

Sanders, Tony

18, ?

Private/Private

5ft 5in, black, black, black

03/18/1864

Fernandina,

Davis

Farmer

Talbot, Westmore41

?, ?

Sergeant/

Private

 

03/12/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

 

Thompson, Benjamin42

?, Tallahassee

Sergeant/

Sergeant

 

03/24/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

 

34th Regiment, Company E

Name, Age, Hometown?

Rank, In/Out

Height/Complexion/Eyes/Hair

Muster Date/Location/ Recruiter?

Occupation

Brough, Martin

30, Duval County

Private/Private

5ft 5.5in, black, black, black

03/28/1865

Fernandina,

Davis

Laborer

Clark, William43

47, Fernandina

Corporal/

Private

5ft 5.5in, dark, dark, dark

04/10/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

Waiter

Werdere, Richard44

24, Key West

Sergeant/

Sergeant

5ft 5in, black, black, black

04/10/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

Teamster

34th Regiment, Company F

Name, Age, Hometown?

Rank, In/Out

Height/Complexion/Eyes/Hair

Muster Date/Location/ Recruiter?

Occupation

Adams, Charles45

37, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 5in, dark, dark, dark

08/15/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

Laborer

Allen, Henry46

25, Jacksonville

Private/Private

5ft 10in, mulatto, black, black

04/25/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

Field Hand

Gabriel, Charles

22, Key West

Sergeant/

Sergeant

5ft 9in, black, black, black

04/25/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

Field Hand

Johnson, William

24, St. Augustine

Private/Private

5ft 7in, black, black, black

05/02/1865

Jacksonville,

Knight

Laborer

Lee, Benjamin

18, St. Augustine

Private/Private

5ft 5in, yellow, dark, black

02/25/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

Waiter

Maguire, Fulton47

22, Key West

Private/Private

5ft 10in, mulatto, black, black

02/12/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

Carpenter

Thomas, Joseph48

33, Clay County

Private/Private

 

04/18/1863

Beaufort,

Bryant

Field Hand

Thomas, Moses

35, ?

Private/Private

5ft 6in, mulatto, black, black

11/09/1864

Jacksonville,

Bruch?

Farmer

34th Regiment, Company K

Name, Age, Hometown?

Rank, In/Out

Height/Complexion/Eyes/Hair

Muster Date/Location/ Recruiter?

Occupation

Dillworth, Daniel49

22, ?

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

12/31/1864

Hilton Head,

Davis

Farmer

Edwards, January

28, ?

Private/Private

5ft 6in, black, black, black

12/31/1864

Hilton Head,

Davis

Farmer

1 Promoted to Sergeant January 16, 1863; transfer to Company I and promoted to First Sergeant February 1, 1863 by order of Brample.

2 Died in general hospital Beaufort, South Carolina April 27, 1863 “preumonid”.

3 Discharged for disability March 12, 1864.

4 Promoted to Corporal March 1, 1865.

5 Appointed Corporal March 29, 1864.

6 Appointed Sergeant August 12, 1863.

7 Appointed Corporal September 1, 1864.

8 Discharged for disability March 12, 1864.

9 Appointed First Sergeant July 18, 1864.

10 Appointed Sergeant August 12, 1863.

11 Killed while on expedition up Ashepoo River May 26, 1864; appointed Corporal March 29, 1864.

12 Appointed Corporal March 29, 1864.

13 Appointed Corporal March 19, 1864; killed in action on Johns Island, South Carolina July 10, 1864.

14 Appointed First Sergeant July 14, 1863; drowned in Ashepoo River May 26, 1864.

15 Appointed Corporal April 25, 1863; reduced January 2, 1864.

16 Transferred to Company C as drummer October 2, 1863.

17 Promoted to Corporal May 26, 1864; reduced September 6, 1864; promoted to Corporal May 1, 1865.

18 Deserted before he was mustered, Jacksonville April 1, 1864.

19 Appointed Sergeant March 8, 1863; promoted First Sergeant May 26, 1864.

20 Transferred to Company G.

21 Transferred to Company ?.

22 Drummer.

23 Appointed Sergeant March 3, 1863; reduced to ranks July 4, 1864; promoted to Corporal.

24 Appointed Corporal April 7, 1863; promoted Sergeant May 6, 1864.

25 Died in regimental hospital at Morris Island, South Carolina September 24, 1864.

26 Promoted to Corporal March 1, 1865.

27 Transferred to Company C, April 23, 1863 by Montgomery; appointed Corporal April 1, 1863.

28 Deserted at Jacksonville, Florida April 21, 1864; rejoined May 4, 1864; deserted again May 24, 1864 at Fernandina.

29 Died in hospital September 10, 1863 of consumption.

30 Died in hospital Morris Island, South Carolina November 12, 1863.

31 Transferred to Company ?.

32 Transferred to Company G November 15, 1863.

33 Appointed Corporal August 20, 1863; reduced October 1, 1865.

34 Appointed Corporal April 7, 1863; died of Pneumonia in general hospital, Beaufort, South Carolina, April 21, 1863.

35 Appointed Sergeant March 3, 1863; reduced to ranks July 24, 1864; promoted to Corporal November 1, 1864.

36 Drummer.

37 Appointed Sergeant March 3, 1863; reduced March 3, 1864.

38 Died November 13, 1865 at Cedar Key of fever.

39 Died at Jacksonville, Florida August 22, 1864 of fever.

40 Discharged by order of General Gillmore February 4, 1864.

41 Mustered as Sergeant, reduced to ranks July 1, 1864.

42 Mustered as Second Sergeant; promoted to First Sergeant July 1, 1863.

43 Discharged April 29, 1863 for disability.

44 Discharged May 25, 1863 by Montgomery and sent to his Company 1st South Carolina Volunteers from which he was a deserter.

45 Deserted April 14, 1863; arrived September 4, 1864.

46 Deserted at Morris Island, South Carolina December 23, 1863.

47 Deserted August 4, 1863 at St. Helena Island, South Carolina.

48 Discharged by order of Hunter.

49 Discharged July 1, 1863 at ?.


BULMER, JOHN

Co. B, 34th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
Enlisted: February 11, 1863, at Key West, Florida.
Enslaved before the war, owner not named in the record.
Discharged: unknown.
Pension record number: not a pensioner.

BULMER, REBECCA, Widow of John Bulmer
Enslaved before the war, owned by (first) Robert Harrison, Fernandina, Florida, and (second) Colonel John Sanderson.
Pension record number 296,532.

GENERAL SUMMARY

After John Bulmer mustered out of the army following nearly four years of service to the United States, he acquired small real estate holdings in Jacksonville, Florida. He married and fathered four children, but was then widowed. He then married Rebecca Bulmer, a former slave of Robert Harrison on Amelia Island, and later became the property of Harrison’s son-in-law, John Sanderson. The special examiner went to great lengths to investigate the widow’s background, suspecting her of having been an immoral woman and to have operated an immoral rental establishment (a “bed house”) in small shanties standing on the property left by her husband at his death. Testimony was contradictory on this point, but in general the witnesses upheld her claim of moral behavior, although not to the satisfaction of the examiner. The shanties were destroyed by the “Great Fire of 1901” that destroyed most of Jacksonville, but the examiner deemed them to have been of sufficient value to reject her claim.

EXCERPT FROM THE PENSION RECORDBureau of Pensions, Board of Review

Widows Cert. No. 296532, Rebecca, widow of John Bulmer
Co. “B”, 34” Reg’t U.S.C.V. Inf.
Washington, D.C. June 20, 1895.To Mrs. Rebecca Bulmer
Jacksonville, Florida (Corner Orange & Clay Streets.)“I have to advise you that it appears from evidence obtained by means of a special examination now on file, that you are not without other means of support than your daily labor, as required to give title under the law by which you are pensioned, the further payment to you of pension would therefore be contrary to law and the same will be terminated.“Under the provisions of the act of Congress of December 21, 1893, you will be allowed a period of thirty days from receipt hereof in which to file testimony in rebuttal of the evidence referred to, and if the same is not satisfactory, and no sufficient reason appears why an extension of time should be made, your name will be dropped from the pension roll at the time indicated above. (See copy of Order 229 herewith.)“Such evidence must be submitted in the form of affidavits and the envelope inclosing the same should be addressed to the Commissioner of Pension, and marked in the lower left-hand corner, “Board of Review.” This letter should be returned therewith.”Very respectfully, D. P. Smith, Commissioner.Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. August 12, 1895. Jacksonville, Florida. Deponent: John [Burral?] alias John Wright: “I am 47 years old am a white washer I am a pensioner at $6 per month the [?] [?]. I live at 996 East [Morris?] St. Jacksonville, Duval, Fla. which is my post office address. I know the pensioner Rebecca Bulmer well. I have known her since before she was married. She always were [?] on him just her husband who was Sgt in our Rgt 34 U. S. Col. Vol. Inf lived with her awhile before he married her, and since he died she has the [reputation] of [?] for never come and go into her house often at night. [?] them are white men, I have heard often that [?] woman go there with men to rent a room and about [?] themselves great excitement around by the house by a report that a couple “got binded together” got [?] together and a doctor had to get them apart. Crowds of people about a hundred gathered around to see them come [?] there was a policeman there to keep the crowd out of the this was at Rebecca Bulmer’s house near Clay and Orange Streets in this city. Rebecca Bulmer [?] clear [?] offices up turn but that only takes in this house in the morning from [?] & Rebecca Bulmer is well off and I believe she owns those little cottages besides the two story house she lives in. “I don’t know anybody in [?] has except W. [?] a store keeper who lives [?] to his house and a colored man who keeps an ice cream and water melon stand [?] to her who could testify as to her character. I only get my [?] and [?] from [?] who give the house her she [?] what hears.”Deposition G. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. February 3, 1896. Jacksonville, Florida. Deponent: Rosa Henderson. “I will be 32 this coming May. [I am a] washer woman, and my city address near Victoria and Clay Streets. I am personally acquainted with Rebecca Bulmer. I have known her for 14 or 15 years. I knew her before she married John Bulmer. I knew of John Bulmer’s death at the time it occurred, although I was not present. After John Bulmer’s death the pensioner in a year or two moved to where she now lives on corner of Clay and Orange Streets and has resided there ever since. I have lived within a stone’s throw of her for 12 years- 7 years of said time I rented one of her little houses- which faces on Orange St. I paid her $4 per month. She has six houses- the 2 smaller houses on Orange St. rent for $4 each- of the other 3 houses- she gets $5 for the 3 room houses, $2 for each of the one room houses- making in all $17 per month in rents, when the houses are rented. Sometimes the houses are rented & then again some of them remain vacant for sometime. She does not collect her rents in all instances. “She has not rented rooms- as a rule in the house which she lives. It is very seldom, if ever she rents rooms in that dwelling. I knew one white lady who rented a room from her- & pensioner has her trunk now for the board. Yes, the white lady was married, anyways they represented themselves as man & wife. She let a room for about one month to a Mrs. Morris- a dressmaker. Her relations from Fernandina have stopped with her know & then. “Rebecca Bulmer has always conducted herself properly since I have known her. She has not cohabitated with any man as his wife to my knowledge. No, Sir, I have never hear anything said against her character, for virtue. I was living in one of pensioners houses at the time the story was circulated that a man was tied to a woman- in one of the pensioners houses. That was unquestionably false to my knowledge. There have been 2 or 3 bad women in the pensioners houses- that is they had that name. Men would be coming & going from the houses of these women. [Nancy?] Jacob & Mandy Shepherd were two of the women I speak of- & I know Rebecca made both of these women leave her premises as soon as she found out they were bad. I have not seen couples of suspicious characters going in & out of Rebecca’s houses. I have not heard anyone say what the pensioner’s property is worth. She has no money in the bank.”Deposition H. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. February 3, 1896. Jacksonville, Florida. Deponent: Nancy Gaskins. “I am between 55 & 56 years of age- and a washerwoman- and I reside at 442 Orange St. I am personally acquainted with Rebecca Bulmer and knew her before she was married to John Bulmer. I remember when they said Bulmer and Rebecca were married, and I also remember when Bulmer died. In a year or two after Bulmer’s death, the pensioner moved into the house where she now lives, which is just across the street from me. She has lived in said house ever since. Rebecca Bulmer rents 5 of her houses. She lives in the two story building herself. If she has rented rooms in her dwelling to people I do not know it. Since you mention it I do remember that a white man & woman, who was said to be his wife- rented a room from pensioner, also a colored woman, named Mrs. Morris- who was a dressmaker. I can not think of any other people who rented rooms from her. “I have not seen people passing in & out of Rebecca Bulmer’s house- that is suspicious characters. I never heard it said that Rebecca Bulmer was a lewd woman. I have heard it said that some bad women have rented her houses, but I have heard nothing against the character of Rebecca. I saw the crowd which gathered in front of her house- when the excitement rose of the man & woman that was said to be tied. The houses were searched at the time and showed the uproar was false.“I have not heard any estimate of the property she owns. I do not know that she has any means in bank.”Deposition B. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. February 4, 1896. Jacksonville, Florida. Deponent: Simon Williams. “I am 53 years of age- work in a saw mill- city add 565 Orange St. I am personally acquainted with Rebecca Bulmer and have known her for 20 years. Knew her husband John Bulmer. I have lived near Rebecca Bulmer since the death of her husband. She has resided at the corner of Orange and Clay Streets. She lives in a two story building which consists of six rooms. I think she lives in the house alone. If she lets rooms in her dwelling I do not know. I have seen people in her dwelling- but do no know they rented rooms from her. I have seen people- woman and men going in out of her house, I have no seen women and men going or coming from the house- which led to believe that they had been there for immoral purposes. I never heard it said that Rebecca Bulmer was anything but a virtuous woman. Never heard that she kept a bad house. I hear something about a disturbance in front of her house- & the report was that a man and woman in are of the pensioner’s house and could not be separated. I simply remember the disturbance and the talk but saw nothing of my own knowledge.

”Deposition A. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. February 5, 1896. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Rebecca Bulmer. “I am about 58 years of age. Do not know my exact age. I was born in Fernandina, Nassau Co. Fla. I was a slave woman before the war and was owned by Robt Harrison, Fernandina, Fla. & after that by Col. John Sanderson. I was a young woman when Col. Sanderson in [?] and brought me to Jacksonville, Fla. The war was “whispering” when I first came to Jacksonville. Col. Sanderson’s wife is still living in this city with her daughter Minnie Sanderson. I lived with Mrs. Marian Sanderson until peace was declared. After I left the Sanderson’s, I farmed two years with my Uncle Daniel Young- then I came into the city and nursed for Mrs. Falana- now Morrison- of this city. I next worked with Mrs. Minne Murphy- this city- and then I went to work for Mrs. Mary E. Tibbett. Mrs. Murphey and Mrs. Tibbett both reside in Springfield a suburb of this city. I then went to the hotel. St. James- & worked for Mr. Jerry Campbell. “I was married to John Bulmer, April 20, 1883 and left the hotel at once. We kept house in this city until my husband died Jan 26th 1884. My husband had been married before I was married to him, but his wife was dead. I had not been previously married. I had no children by my husband. I had one child before I married John Bulmer. That child was born in Fernandina, Fla. about 1870. I guess the child lived about a year only. Well they said I had another child. I [?] positive I guess it was a miscarriage. The father of these illegitimate children was Morris Moore- now dead & gone. Now I tell you the truth. I had a girl child in the beginning of the war by Morris Moore and also a miscarriage by said Morris Moore about the time the war closed. The first child lived to be nearly 18 years old & was killed by a train. “I had nothing to do with any man, until about 4 years after this. I [?] man, white, by the name of James Bell, was boarding at Mrs. Murphy’s and when I went into the room he “flinged me across the bed twice” and ‘first thing I know I was knocked up’. Bell has gone from here. No- I had no more children- “not a” young one since “shore”. I holds up my right hand and swears to that. Yes- I can swear I had nothing to do with any man since my husband died. People may say I have lived one [another man] since- but it is not true. They can tell their tales, but they can’t prove anything against my character. I will [face] them in the courts and face them anywhere. I stay right in my house by myself and no man, has cohabitated and had sexual intercourse with me. I will not say that men have not tried to have intercourse with me. They tackle me and the [?] in my house, but I tell them to go the other way. “I say I don’t want you.’“No- I have never kept bed house. I own up to you that people has come to my house and asked for beds. Now-the other night a man came to my house and asked me to get him a girl. I said “no”. He say “don’t keep no girls- I though you kept girls” and I said “no- go to the fast houses- if you want girls[”]- yes- it was circulated that I kept a bed house and that there was disturbance in front of my house, over a report that a white man and a colored woman “was tied together” in sexual intercourse and could not be separated. The crowd was in front of my house when I came home from work, but I threw the door open and the police scattered the crowd. It was a lie circulated by the prejudiced “niggers” to injure me.“I have had no children since my husbands death have not had sexual intercourse with any man- nor have I sheltered lewd women.“I own two lots- that is- them [?] two lots in my name, on the largest lot there are three houses. The house I live in is a two story house- six rooms including the kitchen. The two small houses have each two rooms- a front room & a bedroom. The small lot has on it 2 shanties or rooms – (separate) and a cottage with 3 rooms. I furnish my own house (6 rooms) and two rooms on the small lot. I have four beds in my house I paid 3 or 4 dollars a piece for the bed stands- no carpets- got walling on the parlor- I might be able to get 175 dollars for all household and kitchen furniture, but I doubt it. I get two dollars for each of the small rooms, on the small lot and 5 dollars for the 3 room cottage on said lot. I get 4 dollars each for the two cottages on the big lot & live in the two story house myself. The small house is in my name but my daughter who was killed by the train helped me pay for it. She left an infant boy- who is 17 years old- and I am his guardian- I use the rents from that lot to clothe the child. I get no commissions as guardian. “I have no money in the bank. Have only 4 dollars at this minute- last week I did not have cent- I get a dollar a week for cleaning house- I sometimes take in washing- My rents when all the houses are rented amounts to 17 dollars per month. This constitutes all sources of income. I do not know what my property is worth. [?] ever that we have many dollars they would give me for it- I couldn’t how [?]

”Deposition E. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. February 7, 1896. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Iziah Gunn. “I am 47 years of age- painter, by trade, and my city address is 1018 Jefferson St. I am personally acquainted with Rebecca Bulmer- and have known her for nearly 4 year. During the years 1893- 1894- 1895- I rented two house from Rebecca Bulmer- one room in each house- I paid her $4 per month- for the two rooms. I do not owe her any board.“During the time I lived in her houses I saw her every day. During the time I was a renter- she let rooms to a Mrs. Morris- who was a dressmaker. I also remember that a white man by the name of Thompson- rented a room for himself but that was in one of the cottages. I heard one time that the pensioner was keeping a bad house. I investigated the matter, & was going to move out if I found it to be true- but I saw nothing suspicious. I never saw suspicious couples going in & out of her house. I never heard the pensioner was a lewd woman- never saw her in a compromising position with men. I have heard nothing & seen nothing against her character. I do not know the value of her property.

”Deposition F. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. February 7, 1896. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Daniel English. “I am about 33 years of age, a merchant. P.O. address is Corner of Clay & Orange Streets, Jacksonville. I am personally acquainted with Rebecca Bulmer. The widow of John Bulmer- and have known her since boyhood. I did not know John Bulmer so well. Remember distinctly when he died. Rebecca Bulmer has not remarried since Bulmer died to my knowledge, and my acquaintance with her has been such that if she had remarried I would have know it.“I am in business just across the street from the claimants residence. I am familiar with her plot & houses on the corner of Clay and Orange Sts. The lot faces on Clay St. 40 ft or over- and Orange St. 115 or 120 ft. [?] on it 6 houses and an old worthless shop- 3 of the houses face Orange St. These houses consist of a 2 story building – containing 6 rooms including a kitchen & of 2 smaller houses, 2 rooms each & the other 3 house are in the back of the lot. The [end?] of one of said houses (3 rooms, faces [?] Clay St. and the other two house (of one room) are further back on the lot. The pensioner resides in the 2 story building and rent the other five houses. She has scantily furnished the 2 story building with 3 beds, some rickety chairs- & a few dishes. She has [?] furnished one room in one of the smaller houses. She rents the two smaller houses facing on Orange St. for $4 per month each- and the other 3 houses – the large- for $5 and the 2 smaller for $2 each- per month- making in all $17 per month which the claimant receives in rents- when her property is rented. Some of the houses are rented all of the time & some of them scarcely any of the time. She had one of more of the houses empty all of the time. They are all rented now. She sometimes lets the rooms in her dwelling. I never knew that she kept anything like an [?] or bed house. She is a woman of good character. She has been [?] & straight for as long as 15 years- had no [?] then. She had not cohabitated with any man, if so I would have known it. If I was going to buy that property I would not give over 12 or 13 hundred dollars for it. That is the estimate I place on it.

”Supplemental Deposition A. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. February 8, 1896, Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Rebecca Bulmer. “I am the claimant in this case. In addition to my former statement- I will add this when I said I was guardian of Ernest Stewart I meant that I has simply “raised” him. Ernest Stewart is the son of my daughter who was killed by the train. I have no insurance on my house, I do not own anything on my house and lot. The property is [?] My taxes last year was $28 I do not know what it will be this year, but I have no money to pay the taxes with. I send money to my grandchild. The money I send to him is the money I realize on the back cottages- Sometimes they are rented sometimes they are not. I couldn’t estimate how much I realize from the house. “I desire to say that the fraction lot on back [?] near Hogan and Eagle Streets is not owned by me any [?] last year and signed a [?] J.C. [?], He have me $200 for it. I have not a cent of it now, “I spent it to live on.” The deed is on record.I am a chambermaid and a washer woman. I get a dollar and sometimes a dollar and a quarter for work. I guess I get 50 or 40 or 25 cts a week for washing. Sometimes none at all.

”Deposition C. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. February 8, 1896. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Stephen Bolton. “I am 40 years of age, a carpenter by trade, and my city address is 908 Clay St. I am personally acquainted with Rebecca Bulmer- and am also familiar with her lot & house on corner of Clay and Orange Sts. My father at one time owned the property just opposite, and I have lived in the immediate neighborhood for 27 or 30 years. See Rebecca Bulmer’s property every day almost- I look right out of my house & see it.“I am also a dealer in real estate in the section of the city. I have also inspected the house and lot this morning. I find the lot is 115 or 120 feet long and about 62 feet wide near the center. Basing my judgment on my knowledge of house-building as a carpenter, I would estimate the six houses on Rebecca Bulmer’s lot including the household and kitchen furniture at 250. Basing my knowledge on my judgment as a real estate dealer, I would estimate the same ground at $450- making a total estimate of $700- I am aware that the assessment on said property is $900, but in my opinion that is an overestimate. I do not know anything about her income from said property in the way of rents. The estimates which I make are according to the times. Year before last that property would have sold for $1000

.”Deposition D. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. February 8, 1896. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Alfred H. Henderson. “I am 45 years of age, a carpenter by trade, and my city address is 627 Orange Street. I am personally acquainted with Rebecca Bulmer and I am also familiar with her property and the probable value thereof. Her lot & house in number are situated on the corner of Orange and Clay streets this city. I have lived almost within a “stones throw” of Rebecca Bulmer’s property for 18 years. I have added to my previous knowledge of the property- by a personal inspection of the lot and house this morning. By reason of my trade, I think I have reliable knowledge of the cost of houses and by reason of my residence in this section I think I have a pretty good idea as to the worth of her lot, independent of the improvements on it. “I would estimate the six house-household furniture and the ground all together-at about $950. That would be a good price at the present state of business and the condition that the lot is in. The lot has brook (small stream) running across the center of it –the brook is covered over with plank- but it should be walled over with stone or brick, as that the low ground of the lot could be filled in where the lower end of the lot overflows. This of course detracts from its value.“I do not know anything about the rents she gets, nor any other source of income which she may have.

”Deposition I. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 19, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Edward Thompson. “I am 57 years of age. A painter by trade and post office address is No. 425 Orange St. Jacksonville, Fla. I have know Rebecca Bulmer for few years. I lived in one of her houses. Corner of Orange and Clay Streets, Jacksonville Fla. was since I have been in Jacksonville few years. I paid two dollars a month rent. She had six shanties in the yard, some had two rooms and some only one. There was two other houses besides mine in the yard that rented for two dollars a piece. I think all of the houses made two dollars a piece. The houses, or shanties, that is what they were, was all destroyed back in May by the great fire that swept Jacksonville. She has no house at all now. I really don’t know what the lot is worth. I know she has no source of income. She works as a laundress and washing and ironing and general work of a laboring woman. I never knew her husband. All I knew is that she was the widow Bulmer. She has not lived with any man as his wife since I have known her. Her reputation has been good one since I have know her. I have known her, a plain, straight, upright woman. Her place and surroundings has been kept in a quiet and proper manner. Her house, or houses have never been used immoral purposes. I been staying there for few years and if I told you that I had seen anything wrong I would be telling a story.”Orlando Fla., June 9th, 1896Hon. D. I. Murphy, Commissioner of PensionsWashington, D.C.Sir,“I have the have the honor to transmit herewith all the papers in the above designated clam for pension, together with my report of special examination. This claim was referred for special investigation, to determine the fact as to whether pensioner has forfeited her right to further payment under Act Aug. 7th 1882, and whether as a matter of fact she is dependent within the meaning of the Act June 27/90. The investigation was ordered as an expert report of Special Examiner Lavin, which [?] title on the grounds above mentioned.“My duties in the investigation of this [?][?][?][?]. The case literally keeps with one [?] and [?]. I had to deal with a low element of people, in relation to the most indecent questions. As is well know, it is almost impossible to get the facts in such cases from such people. The colored people [screen?] each other to the last extremity, and in any instance the investigation of reputation and character as to its immoral phases is a delicate & difficult matter. The claimant’s own admissions constitute the best evidence on both questions involved.“On the question of open adulterous cohabitation, by her own admission she is shown to have been a lewd woman to a date approximating her marriage to the soldier. She acknowledged under cross-examination to have given birth to a number of illegitimate children. However covering the period from Aug. 7th 1882, to the present, she alleges a strictly virtuous life. I have been unable to develop any proof of acts of adulterous cohabitation since Aug, 7th 1882, either by direct or circumstantial evidence. I believe there is a rule of practice, to the effect that if a widow applicant as pensioner is shown to be keeper of a house of ill-fame, the presumption is so strong that she too sustains illicit relations with men, & that in the absence of proof sufficient to overcome said presumption, open, notorious adulterous cohabitation will be considered as established, and the claim rejected as pensioners name dropped from the rolls. There is no proof that pensioner is keeping a bawdy house, and this case is, therefore, not brought within the rule above laid down.“I dismiss the indecent & [repulsive?] story relating to the woman & man becoming tied in the act of copulation on the claimant’s premises. Thorough investigation at the time of the occurrence or rather disturbance, show no such [?] between a man & woman has been pronounced by physicians to me to be a physical impossibility. I am told that but one species of the lower animals are capable of such connection. The most that can be said, is, that the pensioners conduct in the past has been such as to cast suspicion on her character as to chastity, since Aug, 7/82, but there is no proof and I confess my inability to develop any sufficient to warrant dropping.“As to question of dependence, it is a [?] one, and as on the point of adulterous cohabitation, the claimant’s own admissions constitute the best obtainable evidence. The facts are that she owns in fee simple and free of encumbrance, a lot or rather 2 lots which have been merged into one, on the corner of Clay and Orange Sts., Jacksonville, Fla. and on said lots are six houses. The houses are old plank houses, indeed most of them might be called shanties. They are located in Hansontown, which is simply another name for the colored district of Jacksonville, Fla. The rear end of the lot is low, and by means of a ditch which runs through it, overflows during a freshet. The evidence described the property minutely. The total units of the property amounts to $17 per month when all the houses are rented, but the evidence is meager on that point. It is reasonable to suppose that the houses are vacant quite frequently and the rents are not always collected. Of course income in that respect is more or less dependent on the business tact of the claimant, and if she rents to irresponsible persons, the government should not be held responsible. A conservative estimate of the proper land & shanties, is about $1300- although the assessed evaluation is $900- and some of the witnesses place the estimate much lower. Attention is invited to Mr. Greeley’s letter, who is one of the oldest & most reliable real estate men, who deals in that section of Jacksonville. I did not take his deposition in that he was persistent in his opinion that his [missing line] answer every purpose. It is due the claimant to say that she does not own the lot on the corner of Hogan & Eagle Sts, and has not for more that a year. The deed is on record, and Mr. Greeley told me that he had bought the property, the assessment rolls to the contrary not withstanding. I declare it useless to attempt to show how much of the time the houses have been rented as I cannot find all the persons who from time to time have been tenants. They are transients. The evidence of such persons as I could find, will be [formed?] a part of this report. The evidence of claimant is best on this point, and it is not explicit.“The witnesses are reported good, I rate them as they impressed me on the stand. I think, by means of cross examination, the claimant has first and last told the truth, or approximately so, especially on the point of dependence. She is not a guardian of her stepson, and is not legally bound to support him. I do not think she is without means of support than her daily labor, but probably she is dependent within the meaning of the law as [constructed?] and should be retained on the rolls.

”General Affidavit, January 8, 1900. Rebecca Bulmer testified: “The only real estate I own is a strip of land twenty one feet wide and one hundred and twenty six feet long having an outlet on a narrow ally in the outskirts of the city. On this strip of land are three cabins built over twenty years ago and they are now very much dilapidated. This property is not worth over $100. I hardly average $4 a month for rent of them. Besides this I have a life interest in the home in which I live and two cabins which average about $4.00 a month. I have to pay State County and City Taxes which in 1898 amounted to $16.98. This property is assessed as “Unknown” because I made no return to the Tax assessor, I own the first described piece of property and have only a life interest in the rest.

”General Affidavit, July 15, 1901: William B. Watson, aged 64 years, a resident of Jacksonville in the County of Duval and State of Florida, whose Post Office address is Jacksonville, Fla, and Rosa Henderson aged 38 years, a resident of Jacksonville in the County of Duval and State of Florida, whose Post Office address is 804 Pippin Street: “The claimant owned a small strip of land in the rear of Lot number ? Orange Street, on which were two cottages that rented for $2.00 a month each. Claimant has a life interest in the lot adjoining on which a home which brought $4 and the income of claimant since Nov 1900 has been $8.00 a month when the cottages were all occupied. There is no one legally bound for the support of claimant that we know of. She has no children. This property was all destroyed in the great fire of May 3, 1901. Claimant and soldier were never divorced from each other, and claimants has never remarried since the death of her husband John Bulmer. The above facts are testified to from our long and intimate acquaintance with the claimant and from having lived neighbors to her for many years, and knowing her circumstances.

”Deposition B. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 12, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Rebecca Bulmer. “I am about 59 years of age; my post-office addres is, No. 425 Orange Street Jacksonville, Fla. I was slave before the war and I do not know my age rightly but I was a young woman, I think about 18 years old when the war commenced. I had not been married then. I had never had any children. I belonged to Col. Sanderson, he is dead, but his widow Marian Sanderson is living in Atlanta, Georgia. I do not know her address at all. I wrote to her a long time ago to get my age, but she told me the books that had the ages in had been destroyed and she could not tell us the exact date. I give my post office address now as 425 Orange Street because I work there daytimes and Mrs. Henry Cornwell give me a now[?] to keep his store. [?] as Mrs. Clara White all summer until her daughter comes back from the north. Mr. Cornwell live at Clay and Cedar Streets. His store is in State St. I do not know the number. “My fathers name was Pruch[?] Williams and my name was Rebecca Williams when I married John Bulmer. We were married on Ashley Street Jacksonville Fl. in Mr. Benjamin Williams house, We were married by Rev. Cuhluir[?] Summers[?]. I do not remember the date, but there is a record and the certificate was sent to Washington. My husband died in the 26th of [?] it was sixteen years back I [?]. He had been married before, there is the four[?] children I raised, I did not have any children. I was never married before I married John Bulmer. He had been a soldier, he served in the Army three year and eight months. He never drew a pension. He to belong to Co. B 34th U.S.C. Vols. I drew a pension of twenty four dollars, I could not tell you exactly how many year when it was offered. It was offered the last year Mr. Cherland[?] his house as [?], I think that was the time. They wrote to us and told me I had enough to support us is the only reason I knew for their stopping it. “There was a house that Mr. Bulmer left that belonged to his estate. He left it so that I could live on it as long as I lived and then it goes to the heirs. That is a lot on the corner of Clay and Orange Sts. I could not sell it, it was not mine to sell. There was two little cottages that rented for four dollars apiece and the house I lived in. He left four children and they all lived with me and I worked and took care of them. After the children got married the property was divided and all I got was a piece to live during my lifetime. Last May the house I lived in all burned up and all the other houses. I have no interest in it now, the land belongs to the children. There is no property for me to sell, there is nothing in my name. I used to pay the tax, the children never paid any, but it was in the estate of Mr. Bulmer.“I have never been married since Mr. Bulmer died. I have not lived with any man as his wife since my husband died. I never rented rooms in the house where I lived. I used to rent rooms in the cottages to men and women. I knew nothing about them only they would come and pay me and I would let them have the rooms. I only rented rooms by the month, some staid two or three years. It was not a rent house, I never rented rooms for that purpose. For the last five years while I lived in the homestead house my grandson, Samuel Steward live with me and the children came back and forth all the time. Rosa Henderson, Sam Ford, Lizzie Washington, Dick Johnson, Lilly Henry, were tenants in the cottages during the last five years. Sam Cook was a tenant to. I can prove by all the persons [?] that I have not remarried. They all know I have not lived with any man. I will try and be present when the testimony is taken.

”Deposition D. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 12, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida. Deponent: Rosa Henderson. “I am 38 years of age. I wash and iron for a living. I am the widow of Ellick Henderson. My post office address is No. 002 Clay St. Jacksonville, Fla. I knew Rebecca before she married Mr. Bulmer. Her name then was Rebecca Williams. Mr. Bulmer was her first and only husband as I have understood always. I rented a place from Mrs. Bulmer before her husband died and lived there until last May. I have been right on her premises, my intimate and very closely associated with Rebecca Bulmer. I know she had never married since the death of her husband John Bulmer. I never saw anything wrong with Mrs. Bulmer at all. I would know if she had lived with any man. She has a grandson a man grown and he lived in the house with her and she has relations who come and stays with her, but nobody else that I know of. Mrs. Bulmer is regarded as a good woman, the white people give her a good recommendation. I know that her house and that none of the houses were ever used for immoral purposes. All of the houses were burned to ashes the 3rd day of last May. Mrs. Rebecca has always worked for a living since her husband died. I am not related.

”Witness: Eartha M. White

Deposition H. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 12, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Eartha M. White. “I am 23 year of age, by occupation a school teacher. My post office address is No. 804 Pippin St. Jacksonville, Fla. I have known the claimant Rebecca Bulmer from my infancy. I have lived in a house adjoined hers and I have see a good deal of her. Since the fire of last May she has lived at my mother’s house and I have been with her all summer. I remember the death of her late husband because I was with her most of the time, but I do not remember the date. I know the claimant has not remarried since the death of her late husband John Bulmer. I have always known her to be an honest upright woman. I have never seen anything suspicious and that she was not living a proper and virtuous life. If there was anything wrong about her manner of living I would know it. I know that the house in her yard was rented and that in the house with her was a grandson. I have known and I have never heard that her house was used for immoral purposes. If that was true I would surely know it. I am not related.

”Deposition G. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 19, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: William J. Bulmer. “I am 31 years of age. A [?] worker and my post office address is No. 103 E St. Jacksonville, Fl. I am a step son of the claimant Rebecca Bulmer, she married my father John Bulmer. My mother was Harriet Bulmer. My mother died Oct. 12th 1882. My father married Rebecca Williams the next year. I know it was not very long after the death of my mother. My father died Jan. 26, 1885. I know my mother has not remarried since my father died. The claimant has what is called the homestead to live on as long as she live and another piece of land a quarter lot adjoining the homestead, which was her own before she married. The homestead was given to her by the children until her death and then it is to be divided. There was more property left by my father, but that has been divided and in making the division the arrangement was made to let her have the homestead. The claimant had three small houses, one had three rooms and the other two in the [?] yard had one room each. She derived some income, very little from the houses. I know the place did not pay. I know the condition was very poor, but I could not say exactly how much. The building was all burned to the ground the 3rd day of May. She had no other source of income at all. There was no insurance and that leaves her without any place at all. The only land she could dispose is the quarter lot of her own. The property is situated on Clay St. next to the corner of Orange St. Jacksonville, Fla. The lot would bring no more than two hundred and fifty dollars. Owing to its size and the way it is situated it is not worth any more and would not sell readily. The claimant has to work on washing and ironing and cleaning up and wash anything she can get to do to maker her living.

”Deposition I. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 19, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Edward Thompson. “I am 57 years of age. A painter by trade and post office address is No. 425 Orange St. Jacksonville, Fla. I have known Rebecca Bulmer for few years. I lived in one of her houses. Corner of Orange and Clay Sts, Jacksonville, Fla. was since I have been in Jacksonville few years. I paid two dollars a month rent. She had six shanties in the yard, some had two rooms and some only one. There was two other houses besides mine in the yard that rented for two dollars a piece. I think all of the houses made two dollars a piece. The houses, or shanties that what they were, was all destroyed back May by the great fire that swept Jacksonville. She has no house at all now. I really don’t know what the lot is worth. I know she has no source of income. She works as [laundress?] and washing and ironing and general work of a laboring woman. I never knew her husband. All I knew is that she was the widow Bulmer. She has not lived with any man as his wife since I have known her. Her reputation has been good one since I have known her, a plain, straight, upright woman. Her place and surroundings has been kept in a quiet and proper manner. Her house, or houses have never been used for immoral purposes. I been staying there for few years and if I told you that I had seen anything wrong I would be telling a story.

”Deposition K. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 19, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Lizzie Washington. “I am 30 years of age; my post-office address is, No. 1215 [Bridge?] St. Jacksonville, Fla. I am the wife of George Washington. I am not related to the claimant Rebecca Bulmer. I lived in her house about six months, I was living there when burned out last May. I have known the claimant ever since I was a baby and have often been to her house. I have always known her as the widow Bulmer. I have never known of her living with any man, she is straight and upright as far as I have ever known. Her house was not used for immoral purposes. She never kept an [immoral] house. I know she is poor and has to work for her living. I never have seen any indication of her living in adultery and I have never heard that she did. I have no means to say or to think that she has.

”Deposition L. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 19, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Richard Johnson. “I was born in Dec 1828. I am a [?] when able. My post office address is, No. 128 Clay St. Jacksonville, Fla. I have known Rebecca Bulmer for thirty years. I do not know what her name was only Rebecca, before she married John Bulmer. I was not present when she married Bulmer. I do not think she was married before her marriage to him. I did not know Mr. Bulmer’s first wife. I know about the time Bulmer died, I was here, but I don’t remember the date. I have known Rebecca right along ever since. I lived in her yard then for three years and six months. The house I lived in had two rooms. I paid fifty cents a week for the rent. I was living there time of the fire last May, all my things were burned then. All the buildings Rebecca had were burned, there is nothing there now. Rebecca lived there with a grandson [?] [?]. She kept a quiet orderly house. Her house was never used for immoral purposes. It was not an [?] house. Moreover, any woman did not come there to her rooms for a short time. She is a good woman as ever lived. I know she has not lived with any man since her husband died. She has to work for a living and does laboring work.

”Deposition E. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 26, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida.
Deponent: Stephen [Bolten?]. “I am 45 years of age. A carpenter by trade. My post office address is No. 1212 Cedar Street, Jacksonville, Fla. I have known the claimant Rebecca Bulmer over thirty years. When I first knew her she was Rebecca [? Not Williams or Bulmer?] She was a widow then. I never knew her first husband. I knew of her marriage to John Bulmer. I was not personally at that service. I do not remember the date, but it seems to me like it was about 1884, somewhere along then. I know where John Bulmer died because I was in their house to look on him, but I do not remember the date. I have been familiar with her property. Bulmer left his property to his children and a house for her during her lifetime. She had a little narrow lot of land about twenty four feet wide, adjoining Bulmer property and this had two or three little shanties on. Her piece of land as it was with the shanties on was worth about two hundred dollars. All the buildings on Bulmer and on the claimants land was burnt to the ground during the fire of last May. Now as the property is I should judge might be worth one hundred and twenty five dollars. It is a narrow [creek?] running back into the brush. She has no money to rebuild with. She has not got a dollar. I know that since the death of John Bulmer she has not remarried and I do not know any man lived with her. She lived in one of the houses with her grandson and there were [?] in the [?] all in our yard. I never knew and I never heard that her house, in any of the houses were used for immoral, or improper purposes. The people living in her houses were all respectable people. I never heard it said that she kept an [?] house. There was some rumor, some told sometime ago about her place, but it did not amount to anything it was not true. She has always worked at laboring work, at the house and at cleaning up.”

Deposition M. Case of Rebecca Bulmer, No. 296.532. October 26, 1901. Jacksonville, Florida. Deponent: Frank C. Cook. “I am 49 years of age. A common laborer any my post office address is No. 546 Orange St. Jacksonville, Fla. I been knowing the claimant for ten or more years and lived in one of her housed right in her yard. I was living there when burned out last May. The building I occupied was two rooms and I paid five dollars a month. She lived in a house in the same yard and her grand son lived with her. As far as I know her house and the yard houses were as quiet and orderly as any place in Jacksonville. I never heard a harsh word and never saw any disorder. The tenants were regular [?] like myself. They staid there they did no come just for a day or night. Her premises were not used for nothing disorderly as I know of or that I could see. She did not keep an [immoral] house. I never seen her live with any man since I been knowing her. She always worked for her living, at days labor while I was there. I never have heard anything against her character.”


HOLZENDORF, THOMAS

Co. D, 34th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
Enlisted: March 29, 1864, at Fernandina, Florida.
Enslaved before the war, owned 1st by Peter Boughan, 2nd by Andrew Floyd, and 3rd by Samuel Swearingen.
Discharged:
Pension record number 1752,605

HARRIET HOLZENDORF, WIDOW of Thomas Holzendorf

Enslaved before the war, owned by Lewis Higginbotham, Kings Ferry, Nassau County, Florida.

GENERAL SUMMARY

The black soldier Holzendorf was born a slave on February 22, 1836, at Fernandina, Florida. As a slave he became a shoemaker and farmer under the ownership by three different white men: Peter Boughan, Andrew Floyd, and Samuel Swearingen. He described himself as five foot, six inches tall, with black hair and black complexion.

Thomas Holzendorf, known as Swearingen when still a slave, was married three times, each time to the same person, Harriet Albertas, who was born at Kings Ferry in Nassau County, a slave owned by Lewis Higginbotham on July 3, 1843 (as recorded in he family Bible), at a plantation two miles from where Thomas resided on the St. Marys River. The first wedding took place while they both were slaves. Harriet said she was fourteen years old at the time and the wedding took place “on my master’s place by slave custom. We had two children, Tynah and Susan, before the war. Thomas and I ran away from our owners and escaped to the white Federals who came into Kings Ferry. They took us to Fernandina. Thomas enlisted right away, but we married again, by a chaplain first, but did not get a license. I stayed in Fernandina while he was in the war. He was sent to Jacksonville, and I joined him at Cedar Keys and came back to Jacksonville with the Company (after the fourth and permanent occupation of Jacksonville by Union troops on February 7, 1864).” When he was later detailed to South Carolina, Harriet stayed in Jacksonville until Thomas returned after being discharged from the army. He “went to preaching again” after the war ended, and continued preaching at Jacksonville, Newnansville, Ocala, Palatka, and Gainesville, until the end of his life, which came at Gainesville February 17, 1912.

Harriet said Thomas switched his name from Swearingen to Holzendorf right after escaping from his owner, Thomas Swearingen. “I knew his parents, and he knew mine. He changed his name because Holzendorf was his father’s name. Harriet’s name came from her mother’s father, a man she called “Albertas, who came out of Africa.”

Peter Swearingen, a half-brother to the soldier Holzendorf, testified on January 21, 1913, during the investigation accompanying Harriet’s application for a widow’s pension. Peter said : “We had the same mother. His father I knew, he was a Holzendorf. He [Thomas Holzendorf] selected Harriet Alberta for his wife while in slavery, brought her to his mother for introduction and they lived together.” Peter Swearingen also confirmed that his half-brother “ran away from his owner with his wife and two children and lived in Fernandina.”

Tyna Hawkins, daughter of the soldier Holzendorf and Harriet, testified on January 1913. She was a laundress in Gainesville at the time she testified that she “remembered escaping from Kings Ferry and going to the Yankee soldiers,” and to living in Fernandina, Jacksonville, and Cedar Key during the war.

Charles Arnold, a half-brother to Harriet Holzendorf (they had the same mother), testified on January 9, 1913, that he was a hostler, living at 707 West Beaver Street, and that he had a sister living in Fernandina. About his half-sister Harriet and Thomas Holzendorf, Arnold said: “I do not believe there was ever in all their lives two hours contrariness between them.”


SMILEY, GEORGE

Co. C, 34th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
Enlisted: December 23, 1864, Hilton Head
Discharged:
Pension Record Number

WIDOW: EMELINE SMILEY

Pension record number 656,132
Enslaved before the war; resided at Clay County, Florida.

GENERAL SUMMARY

George Smiley was twenty-five years old when he enlisted in the USCI. The recruiter who enrolled Smiley gave his home address as “Suanne,” possibly intending to write Suwannee River, and said that he had been a farmer prior to the war. In this widow pension file little information is available concerning the soldier. One witness said he knew the soldier as John Smiley before the war when he resided in the Suwannee area, somewhere in Hamilton County, and that Smiley had fathered children by a slave wife whom he did not live with after the war ended. The witness said he saw Smiley during the war, working as a baker for the regiment.

This same witness, Lewis Rafila, provided information about the widow, Emeline Smiley, whom he had known as a girl in slavery.

EXCERPTS FROM THE PENSION RECORD

Case of Emeline Smiley. No. 656,132. Testimony given

Nov. 27, 1899 at Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida to J.A. Davis, special examiner for the Bureau of Pensions. Personally appeared Lewis Rafila. Age 67, address: Bernhaus Store, Main Street, just outside the city limit of Jacksonville. “I am a farmer by occupation. I knew the claimant Emeline Smiley when she was quite a young girl, before the Civil War. That was at Middleburg, Clay Co., Florida. She lived at what was called Euriah Scrub. I lived in the neighborhood and was a teamster. I do not remember what her name was then only Emeline. I know she was not married then, she was not grown. She never was married in her life until she married John Smiley. I knew John Smiley at the very beginning of the war, he used to come from Hamilton Co. [two words not legible] to Middleburg, that is when they used to ship cotton from there as that is when I got acquainted with him. I do not know what part of Hamilton Co. He came from. He was not married, I never knowed him to be married until he married this Emeline. He had a woman in slavery times and he had children by her. I do not know who the woman was. I do not know where she lived. The way I know I have seen the children since the war. Washington and Camelia Smiley, are children by the woman Smiley lived with in slavery times. Camelia is now the wife of John Anderson. I do not know what became of their mother. I never saw her.

“After meeting John at Middleburg, I moved up the Suwannee Springs and then I met up with him again, that is where he lived. The woman he had children [by] must have been living somewhere in that neighborhood, but where at I don’t know. I did not see John Smiley any more after that until I saw him here [Jacksonville] in the army. He was in the Bakers shop cooking and I walked up on him. I was not a soldier, but John was a soldier then. I know him from that time on, up to his death. I know about his marriage. I was invited to his wedding, but the night it occurred I was disabled. He was married about a hundred yards from where I was living. It was in church, but though I grew up here I can’t tell you about the streets. It was somewhere between Main Street and the County Jail, was where the Mt. Zion Church is now. It was the church that the white folks had. After they married they lived right in my neighborhood as man and wife until his death. There are no children under sixteen years of age, that was their baby child you was talking with when I came in (Jeanette Brown).

“I do not know the date of Smiley’s death, I knew of his death at the time. I know the claimant has not remarried, she lives right in hollering distance of me. The claimant has no property. She is very poor and takes in washing and ironing and her son helps support her. I am not related. I have no interest in this claim. I have fully understood all your questions. My answers have been correctly recorded. Lewis Rafila, his mark. Witness: P.B. Bedford.”


 

WILLIAMS, HENRY

Co. B, 34th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
Enlisted: June 13, 1863 at Fernandina, Florida
Enslaved before the war, owned by David Houston, New Berlin Florida.
Discharged: Died at James Island, [Morris Island?] S.C. August 1, 1865, of small pox.
Pension record number: None for deceased soldier, but Treasury Certificate numbers 537.467 and 537.486 were issued to Thomas and Martha Christopher, parents of soldier, for bounty and services of their son.

LAURA WILLIAMS, widow of Henry Williams

Enslaved before the war, owned by John Houston.
Married Henry Williams January 1, 1854, at Fairfield, Duval County, Florida.
Pension record number 260,863.

GENERAL SUMMARY

Henry Williams was born a slave at the Christopher Plantation on Talbot Island, Duval County, Florida. Based on pension record information, it appears that he lived with his parents at the plantation, until escaping from slavery and finding refuge at Union-occupied Fernandina. Williams enlisted in Co. A, 21st USCI in June 1863. He was twenty-seven years old at the time, his previous occupation was listed as farmer. Two years later, August 1, 1865, Williams died of small pox, allegedly contracted while on duty at James Island, South Carolina.

A unique feature of this pension record, an application for a widow’s pension under the name of Laura Williams, is the puzzling fact that two women filed for pensions, each claiming to be the widow of the deceased soldier, Henry Williams. Norah Robinson’s claim was disallowed; Laura Williams’s (later Laura Robertson), claim was allowed. The latter testified that she and soldier were still slaves when they were married by her master, John Houston, in 1858. Three children were born to Laura and Henry Williams, the first two were deceased before the war ended.

EXCERPTS FROM THE PENSION RECORD

Declaration for Widow’s Pension and Increase.

(Under the Act of July 14, 1862, and supplementary act of July 25, 1866.)

“On this 1st day of January, A.D. 1879, personally appeared before me, a clerk of the circuit court of [Duval County, Florida], Laura Williams, a resident of Jacksonville, in the County of Duval, and State of Florida, age 35 years, who, being duly sworn, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the Pension provided by the act of Congress approved July 14, 1862; that she is the widow of Henry Williams, who was a Private in company A, commanded by Captain Davis, in the 21st, regiment of U.S.Col’d Troops in the war of 1861; that her maiden name was Laura Houston, and that she was married to said Henry Williams on or about the 1st day of January A.D. 1854, at Fairfield, in the county of Duval, and State of Florida, by Mr. David Houston, and that there is no record of marriage.

“She further declares that said Henry Williams, her husband, died in the service of the United States, as aforesaid, at Hilton Head, S.C. James Island, in the State of South Carolina, on or about the First day of August, A.D. 1865 of Small Pox.

“She has the following-named children of her deceased husband, under sixteen years of age, who are now living, the dates of whose births are, as given below, to wit: Hannah Williams, born January 1st, 1863, living; James Williams, born January 1866, living

“She further declares that she has not abandoned the support of any one of the children above named, nor permitted any one of the same to be adopted by any person or persons; that they are the only legitimate children of herself and the deceased; and that she has not in any manner been engaged in or aided or abetted the rebellion of the United States.”

Report of Adjutant General U.S. Army.

Present for duty to June 30, 1865.

Sick in hospital at Hilton Head, S.C. Since July 25th, 1865; died Aug. 4, 1865 at Hilton Head of small pox, as per Muster Out Roll, and Final Statement.

Death of Soldier from Small pox.

To the Commissioner of Pensions

From O. Ferris, Treasury Department, December 14, 1880.

“You are respectfully informed that this Office has issued Treasury Certificate No. 537.467, in favor of Mr. Thomas Christopher, father of Henry Williams late a Private in Company A, 21st Regiment U.S.C.T. Volunteers, allowing him pay to include the 3rd day of Aug., 1865, on account of the services of his said son; also cert. 537-486, allowing additional bounty, act July 28, 1866, to Thomas and Martha Christopher, parents. The parents and identifying witnesses swear that soldier has no widow or child surviving him. Subsequently, Mrs. Norah Robinson, as widow, filed her claim for arrears, to which was disallowed. Mrs. Laura Williams, as widow, has also filed her claim which is now undergoing examination. The whole matter will be investigated by this office.”

To the Commissioner of Pension,

By order of the Surgeon General: J.J. Woodward, Surgeon, U.S. Army.

From: War Department, Surgeon General’s Office, Record and Pension Division, Washington, D.C., Jany. 29, 1881.

“I have the honor to return herewith your request for a report of hospital treatment in Claim, No. 260.863, with such information as is furnished by the records file in this Office, viz: that Private Henry Williams Co. A, 21 U.S.C.T. entered Regimental Hospital Charleston, S.C. March 11, 1865, with small pox, and was transferred March 11, 1865. No further record found in this case. The records of small pox Hospital Hilton Head S.C. prior to April 1866 are not on file.”

George S. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, to the War Department, Adjutant General’s Office, June 7, 1881: “It appears from the Rolls of U.S. Colored Troops on file in this office that Henry Williams...was born at Talbot Island, Fla; age at enlistment 27 years; occupation farmer; eyes, black; hair, black; complexion, dark; height 5 feet 6 ¼ inches. Company or Regimental Records furnish no evidence as to his conjugal condition.”

Sworn to and subscribed before me, Frank Wright, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Putnam County, on April 30, 1889.

Laura Robertson of Palatka, Florida, “declares that her age is 45 years; that she was the widow of Henry Williams, late of Fernandina in the County of Nassau and State of Florida, who was a Private in Company A, commanded by Captain Davis, in the 21st Regiment of U.S.C.T., who died in the services of the United States at Morris Island, S.C., on or August 24, 1865; that her maiden name was Laura Houston and that she was married to said Henry Williams dec’d about day of ____ 1859 at (I am without a certificate of marriage and unable to produce record evidence of same) and that she was remarried on the 7th day of December, 1868, to Thomas Robertson at Fernandina, Fla.

“This declaration is made to recover all arrears of pay and other allowance due said deceased from the United States. And she hereby constitutes and appoints Mess J.P. and S.I. Wright her Attorney to present and prosecute this claim, and she hereby authorizes and directs them to receive and receipt for any certificate, check or draft that may be issued for the same, and to do any other act or thing necessary or that she might do if personally present, with full power of substitution and revocation, hereby countermanding all former authority that may have been given for the above specified purpose.”

Also appeared before me, Silas Jones and Alexander Hall of Palatka, Putnam County, who declare that “they have been for 5 years as to Jones and for 30 years as to Hall acquainted with the above-named applicant, and with the said Henry Williams 3 years, deceased, who was a private in Company A, of the 21st Regiment of U.S.C.V., and know that he was the identical Henry Williams, former husband of Mrs. Laura Robertson, and that he died of small pox at Morris Island, S.C., while connected with his regiment and in the line of duty, and that they have no interest whatever in this application.”

On this 30th day of April A.D. one thousand eight hundred and eighty nine personally appeared before me Frank Wright of the Circuit Court a Court of Record within and for the County and State aforesaid Laura Robertson, aged 45 years, who, being duly sworn according to law, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the Pension provided by Acts of Congress granting pension to widows: “That she was the widow of Henry Williams, who enlisted under the name of Henry Williams at Fernandina, Fla., on the last day of March A.D. 1863 in Co. “A”, 21st Reg’t U.S.C.T. in the war of the Rebellion who contracted the disease of Small Pox while in the line of duty and in the service aforesaid, and that he died of said disease at Morris Island, S.C. on the 10th or 24th day of August A.D. 1865 who bore at the time of his the rank of private in the service aforesaid that she was married under the name of Laura Bradock Houston to said Henry Williams on the __ day of __ A.D. 1859 by (she is without a certificate of marriage and it is unable to provide hard evidence of the same) Houston Fairfield, Fla. there being no legal barrier to such marriage; that neither she nor her husband had been previously married.

“That she was remarried on the 7 day of December, 1868 to Thomas Robertson; that the following are the names and dates of birth of all his legitimate children yet surviving who were under sixteen years of age at father’s death, viz: Hannah Williams Bell, Daughter of soldier Henry Williams, born 1861.

“That she has not abandoned support of any one of her children, but that they are still under her care or maintenance. That she has not in any manner engaged in, or aided or abetted the rebellion in the United States; that no prior application has been filed that she hereby appoints, with fully power of substitution and revocation, J.P. & S.I. Wright of Washington, D.C. her attorneys to prosecute the above claim; that here residence is corner of 4th & Durham, streets Palatka, Fla. and her Post Office address is Palatka, Putnam Co. Fla.”

I.L. Purcell, Justice of the Peace, Putnam County, Florida. On this 9th day of June, A.D., 1890, personally appeared before me Laura Robertson, age 45 years, whose Post Office address Palatka, Fla., who, being duly sworn, declared in relation to said case as follows: “That her first husband was named Henry Williams. His father’s name was Tom Williams; He belonged to David Houston at New Berlin, Florida at the time he enlisted; that she had three children by her husband Henry Williams: Cain who died in infancy, Mary Ann, who died during the war, and Hannah who is now 30 years of age and a resident of this city. She is married to Henry Bell. Affiant further states that David Houston’s address is now Harts Roads, Nassau Co., Fla. That she can neither read nor write and has no means of giving exact dates; that she was married to Henry Williams about 3 years before the war; that her husband died in August 1865 of small-pox while he was in service; that she married her present husband in 1868. He belonged to Co. A, 21st Regiment Col. Volunteers, U.S.A. under Capt Davis. The Surgeons name was Rose, while company was at Fernandina.”

Treasury Department, Second Auditor’s Office, Washington, Nov. 29, 1892, respectfully referred to the Hon. Commissioner of Pensions in the case of Henry Williams, late a private of Co. A, 21st, Regiment, U.S.C.T.

“The records of this office show that the arrears of pay and bounty under Act of July 2, 1866, were allowed as stated in office letter of December 14th, 1880, referred to in your letter, but satisfactory evidence having been produced the proceeds of Treasured, Certificate no. 537.467, and 537.468, were paid to Laura Williams, the widow of the soldier.

“The records also show that the bounty under act of July 22, 1861, was allowed to Laura Robinson, widow, by Treasury Certificate, No 153.157, issued November 21, 1891.

J. Watterson, Auditor.”