Seminars and Colloquia    2018-2019

Name/Institution

Title of Talk

 Abstract

 Date/Time/Room

Dr. Trung Hoa Dinh, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Troy University  

On some trace inequalities with operator functions

Abstract: In this talk we consider some scalar inequalities and their matrix versions. More precisely, we will show some generalizations of an Ando's inequality for unitarily invariant norms. Some other inequalities also will be discussed.

 

 Monday, March 11th

12:15-1:15 pm

 Building 14 room 2743

Dr. Sergio R. López-Permouth, Ph.D.

Professor of Mathematics

Director of the Center of Ring Theory and its Applications (CRA)

Executive Editor of the Journal of Algebra and its Applications (JAA)

Ohio University  

Numbers as Representations of Operations and Operations as Representation of Numbers

Abstract: Given a finite set S, with cardinality n, the set of binary operations on S is also finite (with cardinality n^(n^2).) We will see a very natural (in the sense that it reflects the title of this talk) one-to-one correspondence between that set of binary operations and the set of numbers {0, …, n^(n^(2)) − 1}. If time allows, we will talk about interesting problems concerning the set of all binary operations on the set S. It was while tackling those other problems that the connection we discuss here came to our attention as a practical notational device.

 

The results in this presentation are due to collaborations with several authors including L. Al-Essa, P. Aydogdu, R. Muhammad, N. Muthana, B. Stanley, and J. Díaz Boils

 

Pizza and drinks will be served in Room 2738 at 11:45am

 Thursday, March 14th

12:15-1:15 pm

 Building 14 room 2743

Dr. Sergio R. López-Permouth, Ph.D.

Professor of Mathematics

Director of the Center of Ring Theory and its Applications (CRA)

Executive Editor of the Journal of Algebra and its Applications (JAA)

Ohio University  

Modules over infinite dimensional algebras

Abstract: Given an algebra A over a field F, a basis B for A is said to be amenable if one can naturally extend the A-module structure on the F-vector space F^(B) to the vector space F^B. A basis B is congenial to another one C if infinite linear combinations of elements of B translate in a natural way to infinite linear combinations of elements of C. While congeniality is not symmetric in general, when two bases B and C are mutually congenial then B is amenable if and only if C is amenable and, in that case, the module structures obtained on F^B and F^C are isomorphic. We will present these definitions including a recent interpretation of these notions in topological terms that is part of the doctoral dissertation of my student Benjamin Q. Stanley.

 

An interesting feature of congeniality is that (not necessarily mutual) congeniality between amenable bases yields an epimorphism of the modules they induce; the epimorphism is one-to-one only if the congeniality is mutual.

 

An amenable basis B is simple if it is not properly congenial to any other amenable basis. Projective amenable bases are defined similarly in a dual fashion. We will discuss what is known and not known about simple and projective bases.

 

The results in this presentation are due to collaborations with several authors including L. Al-Essa, P. Aydogdu, R. Muhammad, N. Muthana, B. Stanley, and J. Díaz Boils

 

 Thursday, March 14th

2:00-3:00 pm

 Building 14 room 2743

Dr. Minah Oh, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

James Madison University  

An Introduction to Finite Element Methods

Abstract: When using computers to find a good approximation of the solution to a given problem, we want to use computational methods that are not only fast but also mathematically proven to give an accurate approximation. In this talk, we will discuss the importance of careful mathematical analysis of efficient computer algorithms and learn about popular numerical methods called the finite element methods (FEMs) that have a solid mathematical theory behind them. Additional to presenting the applications of the FEMs, I will also talk about what problems a mathematical error in these computational methods can cause. This talk will be accessible to undergraduate students that have seen calculus and a bit of linear algebra.

 

 Friday, Jan. 31st

 

12:15-1:15pm

  Building14E/2738

UNF Math and Stat Club 

Actuarial Recruiting

Come learn about careers in Actuarial Science at Florida Blue and about Summer Internship Opportunities. Activities begin at 11:30am. Representatives from Florida Blue will be conducting intern and full time position interviews on Friday, September 21st, 2018.

Agenda

  • Food and Meet and greet at 11:30am
  • Talk will take place 12:15-1:15pm.

 

What do I need to do?  

  • By September 17th, submit your CV to jose.franco@unf.edu.
  • Additionally, bring a copy of your CV to the presentation.

 

 September 20th, 2018.

 

11:30 am 

  Building14E/2738

Dr. Dumitru and Dr. Franco/UNF 

Basics of Quantum Information Theory

This semester we will be covering the basics of Quantum Information and Quantum Computation. Our goal is to cover the physical aspects of Quantum computation up to Schrof’s algorithm

 Monday

 

10 am 

  Building14E/2738