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<CODE_CHIEFS/> Team Programming Challenge 2020

ATTN: Due to the Coronavirus, (COVID-19), Code Chiefs High School Programming Competition is postponed. We have yet to determine a new date for the event.

Any updates will be posted here, on this page.

 

Do you like challenges? Do you want to show off your programming skills? Do you have friends who like the same? How about spending four hours with your friends programming and competing with students in your school and in other schools? Would not that be fun? Join this national programming challenge. Winning a national challenge could be helpful when it is time to apply for college and securing scholarships.

Welcome to the website of <Code_Chiefs/> Team Programming Challenge 2020, a programming competition for high school students, hosted by the School of Computing at the University of North Florida (UNF). In this website, we provide detailed information about the competition and how you can participate.

 

Please visit this site as often as you can to get updated information. (Last Updated: 02/10/2020)

Introduction

Modeled after the global programming contests such as the ACM ICPC and the IEEE Xtreme contests, this competition will provide an opportunity for high school students to showcase their programming and problem-solving capabilities. The problems the contestants will be solving have been carefully handpicked at a level suitable for high school students who may be new to programming and problem-solving. For the year 2020, this competition will be held on March 28, 2020 from 9 am to 2 pm in John E. Matthews Jr. (Building 15) on the UNF campus.

How to Participate

A coordinating teacher from the high school that wishes to participate in the competition must register co-ed teams of two or three students from grades 9 through 12. Teams are not allowed to register themselves. There may be multiple teams from one school. The name and gender information for each team member should be included when registering a team.

 

We recommend participating in the competition on-site at the UNF campus on the day of the competition. However, for the benefit of schools which may be unable to participate on-site, we will also be hosting this competition online at the same time the competition is held on campus. If a school wishes to participate in the competition online, the coordinating teacher will serve as the proctor at the school. We believe that this approach would make it more convenient for the schools to organize participation in our competition as an activity for a computing club for instance at their school.

 

Whether participating on-site or online, each team must be registered for the competition. The coordinating teachers must register the participating teams prior to March 20, 2020 by visiting https://codechiefs2020.eventbrite.com/.

 

Register your teams at Eventbrite

 

This competition is offered free of charge. Light refreshments including coffee and other drinks, will be served at the UNF campus to the on-site participants. Pizza will be served from 11:30 AM to 1 PM.

The Competition Schedule

The Competition Programming Environments

You may use C, C++, C#, Java, or Python. It is recommended that everyone in each team be familiar with at least one of these languages in common.

 

IDE's Available On-site.
Language(s) IDE(s)

C, C++

Code Blocks

Java

Eclipse, NetBeans, jGrasp

Python

IDLE, JuPyter

C#

Visual Studio

Rules and Procedures

  • Around 10 problems will be posted at the beginning of the competition.
  • The teams will be given three hours to solve the problems.
  • Each team will be allowed to use one computer running Windows 10, and this computer will be provided on-site.
  • The participants online may use computers available at their schools.
  • Teams may bring any materials they wish to the competition except computing devices, including calculators, machine readable media, or devices requiring a wall outlet.
  • Cell phones may not be used during the competition, except for emergency communication(s).
  • Teams may choose to work the problems in any order.
  • The competition will be using kattis.com as the platform. For more information on Kattis you may visit https://open.kattis.com/help.
  • The teams must not run programs which are designed to maliciously degrade the performance of the system, or to disturb the work of other teams.
  • The teams are expected to obey federal and state computer laws.
  • The members of each team may not discuss the problems from the competition with anybody except the proctor(s) and its own members.
  • The teams must conduct themselves in a manner that will not disturb the other teams.

Awards and Prizes

  • The top three on-site teams and the top three online teams will receive trophies and prizes.
  • The most diverse teams that performed the best will receive an award.
  • The School that performed the best (collectively if represented by multiple teams) will receive an award.
  • Each participant will receive a certificate of participation.

FAQs

  • Do the team members have to be in high school to compete?

Yes. This competition is designed for high school students who are learning computer programming, including AP Computer Science, informatics, software engineering, or any other kind. The problems the teams will face are at the difficulty level to match the range of abilities of students 14 to 18 years of age, who have computer programming education ranging from 6 months to two or three years.

  • Do the teams have to be in Florida to compete?

No, not at all! Since this competition is also held online, we welcome all teams whose members are currently in high school!

  • Can teams consisting of members who don't take computer programming classes at school participate?

Yes. However, the coordinating teacher should still provide complete team and school information at the time of registration.

  • Where can I find practice problems?

We will use the Kattis system to run the competition. We recommend practicing programming problems archived by the Kattis system at https://open.kattis.com/.

  • How many problems will there be?

You will be working on around 10 problems of varying difficulty.

Remember, you can work on the problems in any order.

  • Do I have to work on the problems in order?

No, you certainly do not!

You may work on the problems in any order.

Note that the problems could vary quite widely in level of difficulty.