Undergraduate Courses

English

CourseCredit Hours

AML2010: American Literature I


Description: This course surveys major American literature from the Colonial period to the US Civil War.
3

AML2020: American Literature II


Description: This course surveys major American literature from the US Civil War to the present.
3

AML3031: Periods of Early American Literature

Prerequisite:  One course in literature.
Description: This course will consist of readings in American literature from the pre-colonial period to the Civil War, with particular attention devoted to two distinct periods. We will consider the ways in which such periods as "the colonial" or the "American Renaissance" are constructed.
3

AML3041: Periods of Later American Literature

Prerequisite:  One course in literature.
Description: This course will consist of readings in American literature from the Civil War to the present, with particular attention devoted to two or more distinct periods. We will consider the ways in which such periods as the "modern" or "post-modern" are constructed.
3

AML3102: American Fiction


Description: The nature and development of American fiction in works by such authors as Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, Stephen Crane, Charles Chesnutt, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Richard Wright, John Steinbeck, John Gardner, Ronald Sukenick and Joyce Carol Oates.
3

AML3154: American Poetry


Description: American poetry from the colonial period to the present, with variable emphasis. See department office for reading list.
3

AML3621: (GW) Black American Literature

Poetry, drama, prose, and fiction as significant dimensions of American culture. Studies may include slave narratives, Douglas, Dunbar, Cullen, Brooks, Hughes, McKay, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Jones and Reed. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

AML4225: Studies in 19th Century American Literature

Prerequisite:  At least one literature course at the 3000 level or permission of instructor. Readings in 19th century American literary texts. Focus will differ with each offering. See department office for reading list.
3

AML4242: Studies in 20th Century American Literature

Prerequisite:  At least one literature course at the 3000 level or permission of instructor. Readings in 20th century American literary texts. Focus will differ with each offering. See department office for reading list.
3

CLT4110: Classical Background of Western Literature

Readings in translation of writers such as Homer, Plato, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristotle, Virgil, Ovid, Catullus and Apuleius, with some attention to their importance to later Western culture.
3

CRW2000: (GW) Introduction to Creative Writing

Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and LIT 2000 or ENG 2012 In this course, students will read works from a variety of literary genres, produce samples of work in each genre, develop productive critiques of one another’s work within a workshop setting, and revise at least one of their samples. This course is for students who want to develop basic skills in more than one genre of creative writing. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

CRW2100: (GW) Introduction to Fiction Writing

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 and LIT 2000 or ENG 2012 In this course, students will study the basic techniques used by both canonical and contemporary fiction writers to build convincing and compelling worlds, characters, and plots. Students will then work to apply those techniques to their own fiction. They will develop the skills and techniques necessary for both a productive critique of their own and one another's fiction, and for the in-depth work of successful revision. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

CRW2201: (GW) Introduction to Creative Non-Fiction

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 and LIT 2000 or ENG 2012 In this course we will examine the narrative possibilities of creative nonfiction. We will explore structure, technique and authorial presence in representative works of established sub-genres, including literary journalism, travel writing, memoir, and the personal essay, as well as more experimental forms like the lyric essay and collage. Students will develop skills and techniques necessary for the productive critique of their own and one another's writing and for the in-depth work of successful revision. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

CRW2300: (GW) Introduction to Poetry Writing

Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and LIT 2000 or ENG 2012 This workshop allows students to explore together the fundamentals of the craft of poetry. Students will learn the difference between poetry and prose, as well as the ability to identify the attributes that make poetry a unique and expressive art form. Students will learn basic terminology and close reading skills in order to write analyses that demonstrate precision and sensitivity to the nuances of poetic language. Students will read and memorize poems by master poets, whose work will be the focus of our analysis. Learning to explicate great poetry will provide students with skills they can apply to their own poetry, which will be the ultimate focus of this course. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

CRW2400: (GW) Introduction to Playwriting

Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and LIT 2000 or ENG 2012 This course introduces students to the art and craft of playwriting. Students will read plays and analyze their basic elements—including dramatic action, characterization, dialogue, and the shape and pacing of scenes. In order to understand the nature of drama from the perspectives of actor, director, and audience as well as playwright, students will write scenes and perform them, a process that will involve staging and directing those scenes. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

CRW2600: (GW) Introduction to Screenwriting

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 and LIT 2000 or ENG 2012 This course examines the basic formal elements of screenplays, including characterization, dialogue, scene structure, plot construction, genre conventions, and formatting requirements. Students will critically analyze screenplays by the great auteurs of the twentieth century. The students' major project will be to write short motion picture or television screenplays of their own. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

CRW2930: (GW) Special Topics in Creative Writing

Prerequisites:ENC 1101, LIT 2000 Students will analyze literary genres, forms, conventions, structures, techniques, and creative writing strategies and apply these analyses to their own creative writing efforts and to critiquing the work of their peers. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

CRW3110: (GW) Fiction Workshop


Description: Students will share and critique drafts of their work. These critiques will help students develop a final portfolio. Students will produce at least two substantial submissions. Students will read exemplary fiction.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.
3

CRW3211: (GW) Creative Non-Fiction Workshop


Description: This workshop offers students multiple opportunities to employ the methods and techniques of creative nonfiction. Students will read exemplary creative nonfiction and explore issues and controversies related to the genre. They will share and critique drafts of their work. These critiques will help students develop a final portfolio. Students will produce at least two substantial submissions.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.
3

CRW3310: (GW) Poetry Workshop


Description: During the course of the semester, students will respond to different kinds of assignment prompts to develop their mastery of verbal craftsmanship. They will also read work by both active contemporary poets and canonical poets. Students will critique and discuss one another's work in a workshop setting in order to gain facility using language with precision.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.
3

CRW3610: (GW) Screenwriting Workshop


Description: This course explores the nature of screenplay writing in a workshop format. Students will analyze the basic and more advanced elements of screenplays and write an original, feature-length television or motion picture screenplay.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.
3

CRW3742: Integrative Arts Workshop


Description: In this workshop, students pursue creative interests in the arts that exist outside or across the traditional boundaries of genre and form. Student projects will explore the creative use of devices, machines, and methods in support of writing projects involving new media, performative and environmental installations, visual arts, video, sound, music, gaming, interactivity, and/or computer graphics. Each student will create a final portfolio comprised of creative work and an essay that discusses their process, resources, and results.
Repeatability: This course can be repeated for up to 9 credits.
3

CRW3743: Contexts and Constraints: A Workshop in Interdisciplinary and Innovative Writing


Description: This workshop extends the ways students approach writing by using a variety of contexts and constraints to generate compelling, thought-provoking, and resonant texts. Critical theory, cultural studies, and/or theoretical writing concepts may be used as contexts in which students develop richer subtextual, multi-modal, and innovative prose. Students will find an interdisciplinary context for each writing assignment, produce two substantial submissions over the course of the term, and create a portfolio that will include a final essay that discusses their process, resources, and results.
Repeatability: This course can be repeated for up to 9 credits.
3

CRW3930: Special Topics in Creative Writing


Description: This course deals with topics of importance in creative writing.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 12 credits with different topics.
3

CRW4424: Playwrights' Project

Prerequisite:  CRW 2400
Description: This course is a workshop in playwriting and play making. The first three quarters of the course is an intensive writing workshop designed to introduce students to the art and craft of playwriting. Students will learn to write and master the 10-minute play format. The final quarter of the course is a play making workshop. Students will select stage-worthy scripts from the plays written in the first three quarters of the course and produce them. The play making workshop includes opportunities for students to hold university-wide auditions, cast, direct, act in, publicize, promote and present their plays in a final performance project for the university community.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 12 credits.
3

CRW4425: Community-Based Documentary Playwriting


Description: This course introduces students to documentary playwriting as a community-based transformational learning opportunity. Students will explore the ways in which human beings narrate, document, and illuminate their lives through storytelling and dramatic interpretation. Students will read documentary plays and learn documentary techniques, including archival research and interviewing, as well as techniques for editing, arranging, and recontextualizing found material. The course requires off-campus fieldwork in the community. The final project will be a staged reading of an original documentary play for a public audience. The course theme and community partners will vary.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 6 credits.
3

CRW4924: Advanced Creative Writing Workshop

Prerequisite:  At least 6 hours of 3000-level CRW courses and instructor permission
Description: Students will continue to develop their skills in reading, writing, and critiquing, while also becoming familiar with the submission and publication process. Projects that students will engage in may include the following: development of submission portfolios; research on journals, magazines, and online publication outlets; completion of submissions by sending out work for publication; and public readings of student work.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated up to 9 credit hours.
3

ENC1101: (GW) Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing

This course is an introduction to writing at the college level. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC1130: Special Topics in Writing


Description: This course focuses on the development of effective composing, revising, and editing strategies. The goals are (1) to develop writing skills needed to succeed in other academic courses by focusing more intensely on style and grammar, and (2) to introduce students to reflective judgment and rhetorical inquiry as the foundation for all communication.
v. 1-4

ENC1143: (GW) Introduction to Rhetoric and Narrative


Description: This course introduces students to basic rhetorical features of a range of texts in different genres, with a focus on the elements of narrative. Students will learn how to read critically in preparation for writing critically on the course texts. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2127: Elements of Style and Grammar


Description: This course offers students practice in analyzing style, revising sentences, developing effective paragraphs and arguments, and writing with force and clarity. This course focuses on stylistic analysis and provides students additional instruction and practice in style and grammar.
3

ENC2210: (GW) Technical Writing

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to scientific, technical, and professional writing with a focus on practical information about communicating in different workplace environments and professional/technical discourse communities. Students will analyze rhetorical situations and issues (of audience, organization, visual design, style, and the material production of documents) common to different scientific, technical, and professional writing genres, including emails, letters, resumes, memos, reports (progress, lab, etc.), proposals, technical descriptions, technical definitions, and technical manuals. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2441: (GW) Writing Topics: Fine Arts

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within fine arts. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the fine arts, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to fine arts and related professional communities. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2442: (GW) Writing Topics:Humanities

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within the humanities. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the humanities, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to the humanities and related disciplines. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2443: (GW) Writing Topics:Literature

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within the study of literature. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in literature, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to literature and related disciplines. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2450: (GW) Writing Topics: Natural Sciences

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within the natural sciences. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the natural sciences, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to the natural sciences and related professional communities. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2451: (GW) Writing Topics: Health

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within health. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in health, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to health and related professional communities. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2460: (GW) Writing Topics: Business

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within business. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in business, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to business and related professional communities. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2461: (GW) Writing Topics: Social Sciences

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within the social sciences. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the social sciences, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to the social sciences and related professional communities. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2462: (GW) Writing Topics:Education

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within education. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in education, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to education and related professional communities. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2463: (GW) Writing Topics: Engineering

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within engineering. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the engineering, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to engineering and related professional communities. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC2930: (GW) Special Topics in Composition

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations. This course will also require students to apply the principles and practices introduced in ENC1101 with a focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the academic and professional communities associated with a disciplinary area, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to discipline and professional communities. Topics will vary and may include topics in: Business; Computing, Engineering & Construction; Education and Human Services; Health; Fine Arts; History; Natural Sciences and Math; Social Sciences. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC3212: Copyediting


Description: This course covers basic editing principles, types of editing, and technical terms. The course includes editing texts from a range of sources such as professional documents, scholarly publications, literary and/or creative writing fields, as well as media.
Repeatability: Students may take this course for up to six (6) credits.
3

ENC3250: (GW) Professional Communications

The primary emphasis of technical writing is on the basics of professional communication-research, organization, grammar/mechanics/style. We will also pay attention to the forms of professional communication-letters, memos, and formal and informal reports. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC3310: (GW) Writing Prose

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 and ENC 1102. Writing of various kinds, such as speculation, reports, documented articles or criticism, with emphasis on persuasion as the object. Prospective teachers give attention to the psychology of helping others to write well. Gordon Rule English credit.
3

ENC3375: Introduction to Fandom Studies


Description: This course introduces students to the rhetorical and writing practices of fandom and other participatory cultures. Students will use traditional formats (essays, response papers, proposals) and emergent writing formats (blogs, social media) to examine how this particular community of consumers and producers use, re-use, and distribute creative and critical works. The course's topic may vary by semester and can include examination of a general concept such as fandom and social media, a particular textual fandom such as Harry Potter or other popular texts, or another specified area determined by faculty expertise.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours.
3

ENC3930: Special Topics in Composition

Prerequisite:  Junior standing or permission of instructor. Topics of importance in theory and/or practice in composition.
3

ENC4260: Applied Technical Writing


Description: This course will guide students in producing clear, direct, and effective technical and professional writing. Students will study and create technical genres such as reports, proposals, descriptions, instructions, specifications, resumes, letters, memorandums, and/or other technical communication formats.
Repeatability: Course is repeatable up to six credits.
3

ENC4331: Writing, Rhetoric, and Community


Description: In this course we will consider the ways in which citizens, activists, scholars, teachers, and students use writing and rhetoric in public contexts. We will begin the course by exploring theories of the public sphere, publics, and counterpublics, and we will discuss how these theories intersect with the work of rhetoric as students read and write the rhetorics of specific communities.
Repeatability: Students may take this course for up to six (6) credits.
3

ENC4403: Grant Writing


Description: This course will show students how to develop grant writing skills. Students will study the rhetorical, resource, and writing opportunities in grant proposal writing and learn how to identify and engage with grant-making organizations.
3

ENC4415: Rhetoric in the Digital Humanities


Description: Rhetoric in the Digital Humanities traces the change from "literacy" to what some scholars have called "electracy." As a result, the course is primarily concerned with the corresponding rhetorical issues involved in this change, such as a greater emphasis on the rhetorical canon of "delivery." Students completing this course will not only be able to understand the philosophical underpinnings of new media technologies, but also to utilize new media technologies in the service of literary and cultural analysis.
Repeatability: Course may be repeated for up to six credit hours
Availability: One semester per year
3

ENC4436: Writing as Social Action


Description:  This course takes as its object of study social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter for online activism. We will consider the ways in which citizens, activists, scholars, teachers, and students use social media and other digital rhetorics to address injustices, collaborate with community groups, and advocate for social change.
3

ENC4930: Advanced Topics in Composition

Prerequisite:  Senior standing or permission of instructor. Topics of importance in theory and/or practice in composition. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits under different topics.
3

ENC4940: Practicum: Writing


Description: Practica are supervised educational/training experiences that offer students the opportunity to shadow a faculty member through the teaching of a course for the purposes of intensive experience and education in pedagogy, course administration, and teaching. The student’s work is monitored, guided, and evaluated by a faculty member. Repeatablity: The course may be taken for up to 12 credits.
v. 1-6

ENG3613: (CD) Topics in Disability Studies

The course will focus on the nature, meaning, and consequences of what it is to be defined as disabled and explore the historical and cultural dynamics of disability. It will primarily address the stereotypes associated with and the experiential aspects of disability as these are deployed in literature, film, television, the arts, and other cultural media. It will address disability rights, legal issues, and public policy as secondary issues. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 credits with different topics.
3

ENG3816: Digital Methods in Literary Studies


Description: This course will consider the transformation of literary reading and research in the digital age. The course will primarily focus on theories and debates within the digital humanities, and will secondarily train students to apply basic tools and techniques, such as computer-assisted textual analysis, text encoding, or web-based archive construction.
Repeatability: Course may be repeated for up to six credit hours.
Availability: One semester per year
3

ENG4004: Research Methods in English


Description: This course will introduce students to a variety of empirical methods commonly used in English research and will examine studies employing these methods. The goal of this course is for students to become familiar with the methods, discourse conventions, and issues surrounding empirical research in English.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 6 credits.
3

ENG4013: Approaches to Literary Interpretation

Applied criticism of principal modern approaches, including psychological, formalist, and mythic. Students read theory and model criticism, practicing interpretation with various genres.
3

ENG4905: Tutorial in Criticism and Interpretation of Literature

Prerequisite:  Junior standing and permission of instructor. Topics in criticism and interpretation of literature. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits under different topics.
3

ENG4930: Independent Study in Literary and Cultural Theory

Prerequisite:  Senior standing and permission of instructor. Topics in criticism and interpretation of literature. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits under different topics.
3

ENL2012: British Literature I


Description: This course surveys major British literature from the Medieval period until 1800.
3

ENL2022: British Literature II


Description: This course surveys major British literature from 1800 to the present.
3

ENL3132: History of the Later British Novel


Description: This course will focus on the British novel from 1800 to the present. Topics, themes, and genres will vary. Areas of exploration include the following: (1) the cultural forces leading to the rise of Victorian social realism; (2) novelistic representations of the British Empire as it expanded through the 19th century and contracted in the 20th; (3) the cultural forces leading to the rise of modernist realism and its new representations of selfhood; (4) the expansion of print culture and new media and their impact on the novel; (5) developments in narrative technique and structure.
Repeatability: This course may be taken more than once for up to 6 credits.
3

ENL3333: Shakespeare

This course studies selected aspects of the dramatic works from the early comedies to the late romances. Consideration of non-dramatic poetry may also be included.
3

ENL3501: Periods of Early British Literature

Prerequisite:  One course in literature.
Description: This course consists of readings in British literature from its beginnings to 1800, with particular attention to two or more distinct periods. This course will examine the kinds of aesthetic, linguistic, and cultural changes by which periods are constructed, and how useful are they to an understanding of literature.
3

ENL3503: Periods of Later British Literature

Prerequisite:  One course in literature.
Description: This course consists of readings in British literature from approximately 1800 to the present, with particular attention to two or more distinct periods. This course will examine the kinds of aesthetic, linguistic, and cultural changes by which periods are constructed, and how useful are they to an understanding of literature.
3

ENL4210: Studies in Medieval Literature


Description: Medieval culture as expressed through literary works by such authors as Chaucer, Dante, Langland, Gottfried von Strassburg and Petrarch. Literature interpreted in relation to social and artistic developments of the time.
3

ENL4220: Studies in Renaissance Literature

Written works from 1500-1660 by such authors as Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Marvell and Milton.
3

ENL4230: Topics in Restoration and 18th Century British Literature


Description: This is a variable topics course focusing on British literature and culture of the years 1660-1789. Topics include: Science and the Body; Satire and Parody; Enlightenment Drama; Women Writing; Empire and Slavery; Travel Literature; The Public Sphere; Enlightenment Poetry; Grub Street; and the Restoration/Eighteenth-Century Britain in Film.
Repeatability: This course may be taken for up to 6 credits.
3

ENL4240: Studies in British Romantic Literature

Representative works by such writers as Blake, Southey, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Lamb, Hazlitt, De Quincey and Scott.
3

ENL4251: Studies in Victorian Literature

Literature and culture of the pre-modern period. May be organized as a major-authors course one time, as a theme-based course the next. Such authors as Carlyle, Mill, Ruskin, Arnold, Tennyson, Browning, Rossetti, Swinburne and Wilde.
3

FIL2000: Film Appreciation

This course introduces students to film interpretation and analysis by teaching cinematic vocabulary and technique as they have emerged and developed through the history of international cinema.
3

FIL3006: Analyzing Films

This course introduces students to key terms and concepts for analyzing film critically. Students will learn how to inventory the elements of a film, analyze scenes, explain the relation between cinematic forms and meaning, and write analytic film essays. This course provides a foundation for more specialized courses in the film studies minor. It will also benefit anyone who wants to better understand how movies affect us and who wants to learn how to write critical film analyses.
3

FIL3300: Documentary Studies

Documentary Studies introduces students to documentary research, techniques, generic features, styles, aesthetic dimensions, and ethical issues.
3

FIL3363: Documentary Production


Description: Students work in teams to produce a digitally-filmed/recorded documentary. Studying documentary styles informs students in the decisions they will make in the planning, scripting, shooting, recording, editing, and exhibition of their (often community-based) documentary. Documentary is understood through its cinematic, artistic, and political contexts (as distinct from television and news broadcast).
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 6 credit hours.
3

FIL3826: American Film Survey


Description: This course will survey the history of American Film from the silent films of D.W. Griffith and Charlie Chaplin, to Classical Hollywood and Film Noir, to the Hollywood Renaissance of the 1970s and contemporary American cinema. The course will examine the emergence of genre films, including the musical, western, melodrama, comedy, and science fiction. Throughout, special attention will be given to the cultural and historical contexts within which film is formed.
3

FIL3828: International Film Survey

Prerequisite:  Sophomore, junior, or senior standing.
Description: This course will survey International Film through historically significant national movements to contemporary movements. Attention will be paid to the development of cinema as a whole and to specific historical contexts.
3

FIL3833: Film Genre


Description: This course focuses on identifying and analyzing film through genre.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.
3

FIL3930: Topics in Film


Description: This course offers varied topics in film organized by movements, styles, filmmakers, genres, historical periods, or themes.
3

FIL4073: American Film in Context: 1970s


Description: This course focuses on American Cinema of the late 60s and 70s within its historical, cultural, political, and cinematic contexts. The Hollywood Renaissance, Blaxploitation, and Vietnam War cinema will all be addressed.
3

FIL4078: American Film in Context: 1980s


Description: This course focuses on American Cinema of the 1980s within its historical, cultural, political, and cinematic contexts.
3

FIL4300: Documentary Studies


Description: This course focuses on documentary film by style, movement, region, topic, and/or theme. Documentary in varying media may be studied.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 6 credit hours.
3

FIL4306: Advanced Documentary Studies


Description: This course focuses on documentary film or documentary production through style, movement, region, topic, and/or theme. Documentary of various media may be studied or practiced.
3

FIL4379: Advanced Documentary Production


Description: Advanced students work in teams to produce a digitally-filmed/recorded documentary. Studying documentary styles informs students in the decisions they will make in the planning, scripting, shooting, recording, editing, and exhibition of their (often community-based) documentary. Documentary is understood through its cinematic, artistic, and political contexts (as distinct from television and news broadcast).
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 12 credit hours.
3

FIL4843: Asian Cinema


Description: This course focuses on the appreciation and analysis of a regional component of Asian cinema with attention to style, genre, director, national tradition, and/or cultural and historical context.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.
3

FIL4848: (CD) World Cinema and the Cross-Cultural Encounter


Description: Based on a set of films that focus on the situation of the cross-cultural encounter--including tourism, immigration, and transnational romance—this course will provide students with the analytical tools to address three central questions: What does it mean to be “abroad”? What are the pleasures, privileges, and perils of being “lost in translation”? And how does the cinema both reflect and participate in globalization? The principle analytical tools will be drawn from the diverse interdisciplinary fields of cinema and media studies, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, and cultural anthropology.
3

FIL4882: (CD) Cinema and Culture

This course examines films as cultural texts. Topics may include: representations of gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, ideology, cross-cultural exchange, and globalization. This course is open to students, in any discipline, who are interested in understanding the influence of the historical and cultural context on film.
3

FIL4900: Directed Independent Study in Film

This course provides students with the opportunity to undertake an advanced, independent study of film. Course content will vary by instructor.
v. 1-4

FIL4931: Advanced Topics in Film


Description: This course covers advanced topics, themes, or movements in film. It may cover topics, such as the Vietnam War; themes, such as crime in mass media; or movements, such as avant-garde film. Advanced Topics in Film contributes to students' broad understanding of film while also increasing their ability to study a topic in depth.
3

FIL4935: Advanced Topics in Film


Description: This course offers advanced topics in film organized by movements, styles, filmmakers, genres, historical periods, or themes.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.
3

FIL4940: Internship in Film Administration


Description: Students participate in supervised fieldwork in some aspect of film programming/management--e.g. educational, theatrical, festival or program administration--to produce a designated project as defined by the student, agency supervisor, and the UNF faculty supervisor.
Repeatability: May be taken for a maximum of 6 credits.
3

FIL4945: Internship in Film Production


Description: Students participate in supervised fieldwork in some aspect of film production to produce (1) a designated project as defined by the student, agency supervisor, and UNF faculty supervisor and (2) an Internship Portfolio documenting the experience.
Repeatability: May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.
3

LIN3930: Special Topics in Linguistics

Prerequisite:  LIN 3010 or equivalent. Topics of importance in the study of language. May be repeated for up to 12 credits under different topics.
3

LIS1001: Beginning Library and Information Systems Strategies

This course is designed to acquaint the novice researcher with both traditional and computerized means of storing, locating, retrieving and evaluating information. This course emphasizes critical thinking and research skills and is especially recommended to freshmen.
1

LIT2000: Introduction to Literature

Prerequisite:  ENC 1101 The course will introduce students to writing about literature with a focus on the close reading, critical analysis, and informed appreciation of different kinds of literary texts.
3

LIT2110: World Literature I


Description: This course surveys major global literatures from ancient periods to the 18th century.
3

LIT2120: World Literature II


Description: This course surveys major global literatures from the 18th century through the present.
3

LIT3193: (FC) Literature of the East


Description: Interpretive study of drama and fiction of India, China and Japan, focusing on Oriental mythic, social and intellectual backgrounds. Includes such writers as Sudraka, Kalidasa, Tagore, Mae Tun, Lusin, Ibuse and others.
3

LIT3213: The Art of Critical Reading and Writing I


Description: This course serves as the first in a two-course sequence required of all English majors. The course introduces students to the intensity of reading by giving them the tools and habits of literary interpretation. Students will learn the vocabulary of traditional literary techniques. This class provides a solid foundation for the understanding of narrative and the practice of critical thought.
3

LIT3214: The Art of Critical Reading and Writing II

Prerequisite:  LIT 3213
Description: This course is the second in a two-course sequence required of all English majors. The course continues training students in the application of traditional literary techniques and concepts of literary theory.
3

LIT3304: Literature of Popular American Culture


Description: Interpretation and exploration of American mass culture from late 1800s to present, including literature of all types, from novels, song lyrics and plays, to film and film scripts, rock operas and best-sellers.
3

LIT3331: Children's Literature


Description: This course examines literature for children from social, psychological, educational, and other points of view.
3

LIT3333: Young Adult Literature


Description: This course examines texts created for young readers. Students will read classic and contemporary literature considered suitable for middle school students, as well as read literary criticism focusing on Young Adult literature. The course considers what characteristics place a text within the field, as well as characteristic themes and concerns of the texts.
3

LIT3930: Special Topics: Literature

Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
Description: Variable topics in literature.
Repeatability: May be repeated up to 12 credits under different topics.
3

LIT4042: Dramatic Literature


Description: This course offers students an opportunity to examine dramatic literature in different contexts. The course may focus on a period of dramatic literature, a genre, a theme or topic, or explore connections between drama and other modes of performance. Selected works may explore such topics as the representation of suffering on stage, the representation of women in tragic theater, the suicidal impulse in/of Modernism, the conflict between presentation and representation, or the enduring presence of tragedy. This course will provide instruction in methods for analyzing dramatic literature.
3

LIT4083: Studies in Modern Literature

Literature and culture of the modern era (roughly late 19th century to mid-20th century). May focus on a particular theme, author, genre, group of authors or national literature. Course may be repeated up to 12 credits under different topics.
3

LIT4093: Contemporary Literature

Various approaches to the literature of the generations since World War II. May be international in scope or may concentrate on the literature of one nation. Course may be repeated up to 12 credits under different topics.
3

LIT4243: Major Authors

Prerequisite:  Junior standing or permission of instructor. Study of writings by one or more authors. Variable topics. May be repeated up to 12 credits under different topics.
3

LIT4650: Comparative Literature

Variable topics; world literatures in translation. Course may be repeated up to 12 credits under different topics.
3

LIT4905: Independent Study

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor and department chairperson. Tutorials or senior theses handled under this title. May be repeated up to 12 credits under different topics and permission of department.
v. 1-3

LIT4930: Special Topics in Literature

Prerequisite:  Junior standing or permission of instructor. Topics of importance in literature. Course may be repeated up to 12 credits under different topics.
v. 1-3

LIT4934: Seminar in Literature

Prerequisites: 4 upper-division English courses or permission of instructor. This course serves as an advanced capstone for English majors. Its purpose is to provide an opportunity for small-group, intensive study and practice with both primary texts and approaches to literary criticism. Thus, integration of both in-depth studies of literary texts and critical skills will characterize the course experience.
3

LIT4940: Practicum: English


Description: Practica are supervised educational/training experiences that offer students the opportunity to shadow a faculty member through the teaching of a course for the purposes of intensive experience and education in pedagogy, course administration, and teaching. The student’s work is monitored, guided, and evaluated by a faculty member. Repeatablity: This course may be taken for up to 12 credits.
v. 1-6

THE2000: Theater Appreciation

This course is for students interested in understanding and appreciating one of the oldest art forms in the world. For thousands of years, humans have put on masks and adopted personas and behaved as if they were different from the people they are. Why? Why have they felt the need to pretend to be who they are not, to express feelings that are not really their own, and to direct their bodies to act out stories in front of spectators, stories in which they come into conflict with others? In order to address these and related questions, students will read plays, analyze scripts, and attend and write about local productions. They may also complete a group project in a live theater. No acting experience is required. The course can be applied to Category C for non-applied fine arts General Education credit.
3

THE4904: Independent Study in Drama and Theater


Description: This course supports student-designed reading, research, or performance projects.
Repeatability: The course may be repeated for up to 12 credit hours and requires departmental permission.
v. 1-6

THE4935: Special Topics in Drama and Theater


Description: This course can be offered as a lecture, seminar, or studio course covering selected topics of interest in drama or theater.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 6 credits under different topics.
3

TPP2100: Acting I

This is a beginning course in the fundamentals of acting. Students learn a working vocabulary and acquire basic skills of the acting process. Through formal and improvisational techniques for developing vocal, physical, and analytical skills associated with behavior-based acting, students explore the imagination as the actor's primary resource for building a character. Emphasis is on relaxation, trust, and mental agility. Some monologue and/or scene work may be required.
3

TPP3103: Acting II

Prerequisite:  TPP 2100 or permission of instructor This is an advanced course in acting that builds on skills learned in Acting I. Students gain a working knowledge of the analysis, rehearsal, and performance techniques associated with particular acting methods or styles. Different semesters focus on different styles depending on the semester's production schedule. Acting methods and styles include techniques associated with works in Realism and the American "Method" as practiced by Adler, Meisner, and Hagen; techniques associated with analysis and performance of the classical verse drama of Shakespeare and Moliere; techniques associated with Commedia, Expressionism, and Brechtian theater; techniques associated with more physically based systems such as Alexander and Suzuki. Students will read dramatic texts and theory. A commitment to substantial scene rehearsal is required. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.
3

TPP4241: Theater for Social Change


Description: This course is an introductory workshop addressing the theory, application, and facilitation of techniques associated with applied theater. Students will learn games, exercises and techniques for creating improvisations that empower participants to collectively investigate thorny issues, build consensus, and rehearse problem-solving strategies to implement in the real world. This course is for students interested in education, social work, allied health fields, the arts, or those interested in working toward social change in their communities. This hands-on, participatory workshop is 80% experiential and 20% reflective/didactic. No theater experience or training is necessary. Students will be asked to bring with them a desire to play, learn, and grow in an intimate, highly personal setting.
3