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2021-2022 Catalog
Computing students solve problem at glassboard

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

Bachelor of Science in Information Systems

Bachelor of Science in Information Science

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

Bachelor of Science in Computing & Info Science - Data Science

Master of Science in Computing & Info Sciences

School of Computing Faculty

School of Computing Programs

Undergraduate Program Information 

Graduate Program Information

School of Computing

Director: Dr. Sherif Elfayoumy, Professor

John E. Mathews Jr Building, 

Building 15, Room 3201

Phone: (904) 620-2985

Fax: (904) 620-2988

Web Address: www.unf.edu/ccec/computing/

Email: computing@unf.edu   

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Vision

The School of Computing seeks to provide a nationally and internationally recognized center of learning in the computer and information sciences, focusing on application of state-of-the-art computer technology, and supporting regional aspirations to excel in computer-related enterprise. Led by its faculty, and represented by its students, the School seeks to provide an educational atmosphere both intellectual and practical, extending the frontiers of knowledge to the betterment of humankind.

Mission

The School of Computing is dedicated to the promotion of an academically exciting and progressive intellectual climate, characterized by a superior program of instruction, peer-recognized scholarship, effective support services, and productive professional community involvement. In particular, the School is committed to offering undergraduate and graduate degree programs observing national standards, maintaining and expanding course offerings to keep pace with the rapid development of computer theory and computer technology. In recognition of its leadership position in the computer and information sciences, the School supports the need for instruction in computing as required by other University programs and advocates faculty participation in collaborative computer-related projects involving other professionals or colleagues. The vitality of the School is enhanced by encouraging ongoing faculty research and development, ultimately serving the instructional mission of the School and providing both Northeast Florida and the nation with a wellspring of knowledge and wisdom for the computer and information sciences.

Values

The School of Computing recognizes its responsibility towards establishing and supporting a strong ethical standard for both personal and societal use of computer technology, characterized by integrity and professionalism, without sacrificing openness and innovation. Given the School's role in the education of future leaders for the development of the computer-related applications, particular value is placed on providing an environment characterized by a strong sense of professional responsibility, understanding of the larger issues involved in making a functional society, sensitivity to the concerns deriving from ethnic or gender differences, appreciation for the cultural contributions of others, and awareness of the potential effect of one's personal and professional conduct on others. The School seeks to provide a supportive, sensitive, academic environment wherein students, faculty, and staff alike feel both their individual and collective importance to the School.  

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Academic Programs

The School of Computing has primary responsibility for all computing-related instruction at UNF at all levels. For undergraduate students, the school offers the Bachelor of Science degrees in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Science, Information Technology and Computing and Information Science-Data Science, and a minor in Computing. For graduate students, the school offers a research-focused Master's of Science degree in Computing & Info Sciences with tracks in Computer Science, Cybersecurity, Data Science, and Information Systems. For all the graduate programs students can select between a Thesis option and a Non-Thesis option. With all our programs, we expect our students to improve their communication skills, effectively collaborate, and conduct themselves professionally.


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Computing Advisory Board (CAB) 

This council is composed of approximately 25 Computing executives and professionals from the business community who meet on a regular basis to advise the director of the School on current industry trends in computing and information sciences.


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Student Organizations

Faculty from the School sponsor student organizations for the American Computing Machinery (ACM), Osprey Security (OSEC), Computer Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE-CS), Society of Women Advancing Technology (SWAT), Artificial Intelligence Research Organization (AIRO), and the Upsilon Pi Epsilon (UPE) Honor Society in the Computing Sciences. These organizations provide students with important professional contact groups in Jacksonville and throughout the national computing community.  See the School of Computing web pages for more information.

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School of Computing Faculty

Sanjay P. Ahuja, Ph.D., Professor

Asai Asaithambi, Ph.D., Professor & Graduate Program Director

Yap S. Chua, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus

Neal S. Coulter, Ph.D., Professor and Dean Emeritus

Mai Dahshan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Ayan Dutta, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Roger E. Eggen, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus

Sherif Elfayoumy, Ph.D., Professor & School Director

Anirban Ghosh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Richa Jethwani, M.S., Instructor

Indika Kahanda, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Upulee Kanewala, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

William Klostermeyer, Ph.D., Professor & Dean

James Littleton, M.S., Associate Instructor

Elise Marshall, M.S., Associate Instructor & Academic Advisor

Kenneth E. Martin, Ph.D., Professor & Founding Director Emeritus

Scott Piersall, M.S., Visiting Instructor

Zornitza G. Prodanoff, Ph.D., Professor

Sandeep Reddivari, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Robert F. Roggio, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus

Swapnoneel Roy, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Behrooz Seyed-Abbassi, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus

Larry Snedden, M.S., Instructor & Academic Advisor

Judith L. Solano, Ph.D., Associate Professor & Director Emerita

Katarzyna Tarnowska, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Karthikeyan Umapathy, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Iman Vakilinia, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Charles N. Winton, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus

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School of Computing Programs

 

Undergraduate Programs - Bachelor of Science


Graduate Programs - Master of Science   


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Undergraduate Program Information

Undergraduate Academic Policies

The College of Computing, Engineering, and Construction adheres to all academic policies and regulations of the University. In addition, the School of Computing has policies which apply to all undergraduate students in the School of Computing.

Individuals needing clarification of any of these policies, or an interpretation of how a policy might apply in a given situation, should contact the School office located in the Mathews Building, Building 15/Room 3201, call (904) 620-2985, or email computing@unf.edu.

Admission

Students seeking admission to the School of Computing must meet the general requirements of the University relative to admission. Students lacking any program prerequisites are encouraged to complete these courses as soon as possible to be on-track for a timely graduation.

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Admission With Less Than 2.0 Grade Point Average

Students who are admitted with less than the minimum 2.0 grade point average are placed on academic probation. Special conditions for admission are outlined by the Director of the School, and students must meet these conditions in order to continue their studies in the School of Computing.

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Academic Advising

When a student is admitted to the School of Computing, an advisor will prepare a program of study outlining the program requirements.

Students considering majoring in a computing program are strongly encouraged to meet with a School advisor as early as possible. Advising appointments for development of a personalized program of study must be scheduled within the first semester of attaining sophomore status. Advising appointments are scheduled through visiting the School office located in the Mathews Building, Building 15/Room 3201, calling (904) 620-2985, or emailing computing@unf.edu.

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Attendance Policy

The faculty of the School of Computing believe that students need to make their academic studies a priority during their enrollment in our programs. Due to the amount and complexity of the material, students should ensure their ability to attend the entire class period. Thus, we have developed the following attendance policy which may be used at the discretion of the course instructor: 

  • Students who miss more than 25% of scheduled class meetings, regardless of their grades, may be asked to withdraw from the course or given an "F" grade in the course.

 

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Transfer Coursework

Students desiring to transfer upper-level course work to the School of Computing must have the work approved by an academic advisor. With approval, a maximum of 10 credit hours of upper-level transfer course work may be used in the student’s program of study. Upper level course work completed more than five years prior to the beginning of continuous enrollment at UNF may not be applied toward the program unless validated. Continuous enrollment is defined as enrollment as a degree-seeking student and completion of one or more courses per term without a break of three consecutive terms.

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Concurrent Coursework 

Once a student is admitted to UNF, the student may not complete course work at another institution for transfer to UNF without a School advisor’s approval and completion of a Concurrent Enrollment Form with proper authorizations prior to starting the transfer courses. It is expected that once a student enrolls in the College of Computing, Engineering and Construction, he/she will complete all prerequisite and major courses at UNF. 

Concurrent enrollment at another college or university is not allowed during a student’s graduating semester.

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Directed Independent Study

No more than six credit hours of directed independent study may be applied to a student's program of study. A maximum of three credit hours with the same Computing faculty member is allowed. All directed independent study proposals must be approved by the director of the School.

 

Experiential Learning (Co-op)

No more than six credit hours of experiential learning (co-op) credit may be applied to a student's program of study. All co-op proposals must be approved by the director of the School. No more than 3 credit hours of experiential studies may be used to satisfy major or minor electives.

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Satisfactory Progress Policy

The School of Computing enforces a “one repeat” rule for all prerequisite and core courses offered taught by the School for its major programs. Students who do not successfully complete a prerequisite or core requirement for a School of Computing course on the first attempt (i.e. earn a grade of D, F, W) will be granted one chance to repeat the course. Students who do not successfully complete a prerequisite or core requirement within two attempts will not be permitted to register for courses offered by the School in future semesters. This stipulation applies whether or not the student has declared a major in a School of Computing program.

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Probation/Suspension Policy

An undergraduate student who fails to earn a cumulative or term GPA of 2.0 after attempting a cumulative total of 12 or more credit hours will be placed on academic probation. Academic probation is a warning. If both the term and cumulative GPA fall below 2.0 during the next term of enrollment, the student will be eligible for suspension. The School of Computing Suspension Review Committee (SRC) will determine the action to be taken in each case. If suspended, the student will be dropped from any courses currently registered and denied the opportunity to re-enroll. The duration of suspension varies in accordance with recommendations of the SRC. At a minimum, if suspended the student is not allowed to take coursework for one semester.

A suspended student who desires to be reinstated to the School must submit a Request for Reinstatement to the School of Computing. The request must be received at least two weeks prior to the University’s admission deadline for the term the student intends to return. The Request for Reinstatement can be obtained from the School office or website. The SRC meets once a term to review requests. Recommendations of the SRC are submitted to the School director for final decision.

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Honors in Computing  

The Honors Program at UNF is designed for the student who is intellectually mature and seeks the challenge of academic work different from the traditional course of study. It offers students a close collegial relationship with the University’s top professors and with each other. There are two types of honors programs at the University of North Florida. The first is a lower-level program open to freshmen and sophomores offered by the Hicks Honors College. The second is the “Honors in the Major” program open to students in the School of Computing. A student does not have to be in the lower level Hicks Honors College to enroll in the “Honors in Computing” program. The “Honors in Computing” program offers two tracks in Leadership and Research and special recognition on the student's transcript. The Leadership track requires a minimum of 90 leadership hours and the research track requires a minimum of 60 leadership hours and completing six credits of CIS4910 Computing Honors Research. 

 Admission is competitive and limited to students with a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or better. More information on additional admission requirements and procedures for applying to the program can be obtained from a School of Computing Academic Advisor.

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Accelerated Computing BS-MS Program

The School of Computing offers a unique opportunity for qualified students to seek both the bachelor and master's degrees in an accelerated program of study for all its programs (Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Science, Information Technology, and Data Science). Qualified students will be able to take six credits of graduate-level courses as part of their undergraduate studies, which will also apply toward their future graduate studies. Interested and qualified students must submit an application for the accelerated program to the School of Computing to the registration period of the term in which the student wishes to register for a graduate level course. It is highly recommended that students interested in the accelerated program meet with an advisor to learn how the program may affect financial aid and tuition rates. 

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Computer Science Program, B.S. 

The Computer Science Program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

This program is modeled according to the recommendations of the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) and the IEEE-CS (Computer Society of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers). It focuses on studying the theoretical foundations of the computing field and system-level programming. Students study the intricacies and design principals of sophisticated computing systems such as compilers, operating systems, algorithm analysis and design, and artificial intelligence. The Computer Science program has a significant component of math and science courses. 

Graduates of the program will be prepared to create new technologies that apply to a wide variety of application areas. Systems engineer and systems programmer are typical titles for the first job of the program graduates.

The Computer Science Academic Learning Compact articulates the program's educational objectives and outcomes. 

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Data Science Program, B.S.

The Data Science program has a primary emphasis on studying methods for managing and analyzing large datasets. It also has a significant component of math and science courses. With courses focused on statistics, database systems, algorithm design and analysis, and data analytics graduates of the program will be able to design, implement, and use methods for the discovery of patterns and prediction of future trends from datasets. Typical first job titles include data scientist, and data analyst.

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Information Systems Program, B.S.

The Information Systems Program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org.  

This program follows the curriculum recommendations of the Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP). The   Information Systems Program combines computer course work with a complementary selection of business courses. The Information Systems Program is strongly recommended for those interested in business-oriented computer applications. The Business Administration minor is a required and integral component of the Information Systems Program.

Computer courses include systems analysis, systems implementation, computer communications, database processing, and other courses focused on implementation of computer solutions to business problems. Graduates will be prepared for careers as applications programmers, systems analysts, or information systems managers.

The Information Systems Academic Learning Compact articulates the program's educational objectives and outcomes. 

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Information Science Program, B.S.

The Information Science Program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org.  

This program is identical in computer course work to the Information Systems program; however, the student may select a minor from an area other than business administration. Depending upon the choice of a minor, graduates will be prepared for careers as systems programmers, applications programmers, systems analysts or other specialized computer-related professionals.

In addition to the computing course work, the Information Science Program requires studies in a minor area other than business administration. A minor consists of a planned selection of courses supportive of the major. Minors are described in the UNF catalog under the appropriate college. Courses applied toward the major may not be counted in the minor.

This major incorporates the same computing courses as the Information Systems Program and is only recommended for a student who has a strong interest in a secondary field other than business administration. It can also be used for a post-baccalaureate student seeking a second bachelor’s degree; as a minor is not required for a second bachelor’s degree.

The Information Science Academic Learning Compact articulates the program's educational objectives and outcomes. 

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Information Technology Program, B.S. 

The Information Technology Program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

In an effort to meet the demands of an ever-changing technology market, the School offers a program in Information Technology.This program combines professional requirements with general education requirements and electives to prepare students for a career in the information technology field or for graduate work in Information Technology.

Students completing this program will be specialists ready to face high expectations of organizations with respect to planning, design, implementation, configuration, and maintenance of a computing infrastructure. They will be able to apply computing principles and concepts by participating in practical activities throughout the program. By joining this program, students attain expertise in areas of growing demand. 

The Information Technology Academic Learning Compact articulates the program's educational objectives and outcomes. 

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Graduate Program Information

Graduate Academic Policies and Requirements

The College of Computing, Engineering, and Construction adheres to all academic policies and regulations of the University. In addition, the School of Computing has policies which apply to all graduate students in the School of Computing.

Individuals needing clarification of any of these policies, or an interpretation of how a policy might apply in a given situation, should contact the School office located in the Mathews Building, Building 15/Room 3201, call (904) 620-2985, or email computing@unf.edu.

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Admission

In addition to satisfying general University of North Florida criteria for admission into a graduate program, students who wish to enter the degree program leading to the M.S. in Computer and Information Sciences must present:

  1. GRE scores:
    • Taken prior to July 1, 2011:  composite score of 1000 (400 verbal, 600 quantitative) or higher,
    • Taken after July 1, 2011:     144 verbal, 148 quantitative
     
  2. A grade point average of 3.0 or higher in all work attempted as an upper level student, normally the 60 credit hours taken during the last two years of undergraduate study, and
  3. An undergraduate degree supporting graduate study in one of computer science, cybersecurity, data science, or information systems, including course work in procedural and object-oriented programming, data structures, applied discrete mathematics, databases, and computer networks.

A student who does not have a degree in the field will need to complete preparatory course work with grades of “B” or above as a post-baccalaureate student in the above topics before seeking admission into the graduate program. Such students may make an appointment with the graduate program director to develop a program of study to meet background preparation requirements in MS in Computing & Info Sciences (CIS) as outlined below:

MS in CIS Preparation/Prerequisites

  • Computational/Discrete Structures (COT3100 at UNF)
  • Programming II (COP 3503 at UNF)
  • Data Structures (COP 3530 at UNF)
  • Intro to Databases (COP 3703 at UNF)
  • Computer Networks (CNT4504 at UNF)    

Note: Each of the prerequisite courses listed has its own course prerequisites. 

A student who meets all admission requirements should apply for admission as a graduate student through the Graduate School at UNF, designating one of the following concentrations: computer science, information systems, or software engineering. When all transcripts and test scores have been received by the Graduate School, the completed application package is forwarded to the School of Computing where it is considered by the School’s graduate committee for admission to any of the School's graduate programs. Upon notification of admission to the graduate program, the student will be invited to meet with the graduate program director for preparation of a program of study. 

Note: All applications, transcripts, test scores, and supporting documents must be sent directly to the Graduate School, University of North Florida, 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224. 
For complete details on graduate admission, refer to the UNF Graduate School's webpages.

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Thesis Option Program Requirements

The Thesis option degree candidate is required to complete 24 credit hours of course work and a master’s thesis (minimum of 6 credit hours), prepared according to School and University guidelines. The thesis requires a significant literature review and the application, synthesis, and/or extension of the knowledge gained, in such as way as to enhance the discipline of computing and information sciences.

 

Non-Thesis Option Program Requirements

The Non-Thesis option degree candidate is required to complete 24 credit hours of course work and a graduate research experience of 6 credit hours, work in an existing research program under the supervision of a computing graduate faculty, and participate in the development and submission of a manuscript to a journal scholarly publication or an external grant proposal.


Academic Policies and Requirements

  1. A GPA of 3.0 or better must be maintained. A GPA below 3.0, receiving a grade below 'C+' in two courses, or receipt of 'D' or 'F' in one course will result in suspension from the program.

  2. No more than 6 credit hours taken outside of the School can be included in the degree.
  3. No more than 6 credit hours of 5000-level courses can be applied to the degree. 
  4. Students must declare thesis/non-thesis option before completion 15 credit hours in the program. 
  5. Special Topics in Computing (CIS6930) may be approved by the Graduate Director to substitute any of the program courses.

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Computer Science Program (MS) 

The Computer Science Program for the M.S. in Computer and Information Sciences is built on a computing foundation (core) to provide research-oriented advanced studies in computing (breadth) with a focus (depth) on computer science. To enroll in the program, students have to have completed a bachelor's degree that included courses in procedural and object-oriented programming, data structures, applied discrete mathematics, databases, and computer networks. The core courses include research methods, information assurance, and a practicum experience. The breadth includes courses such as cloud computing, machine learning, and advanced computer networks. The computer science depth includes courses such as design & analysis of algorithms, advanced artificial intelligence, and parallel computing. Students can choose between a Thesis option and a Non-Thesis option. Both options entail working under the direct supervision of a computing graduate faculty to produce research outcomes that demonstrate mastery of computer science. 

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Cybersecurity Program (MS) 

The Cybersecurity Program for the M.S. in Computer and Information Sciences is built on a computing foundation (core) to provide research-oriented advanced studies in computing (breadth) with a focus (depth) on cybersecurity. To enroll in the program, students have to have completed a bachelor's degree that included courses in procedural and object-oriented programming, data structures, applied discrete mathematics, databases, and computer networks. The core courses include research methods, information assurance, and a practicum experience. The breadth includes courses such as applied cryptography, advanced computer networks, and cloud computing. The cybersecurity depth includes courses such as internet of things, internet security, wireless network security, and secure software development. Students can choose between a Thesis option and a Non-Thesis option. Both options entail working under the direct supervision of a computing graduate faculty to produce research outcomes that demonstrate mastery of cybersecurity.

 

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Data Science Program (MS) 

 
The Data Science Program for the M.S. in Computer and Information Sciences is built on a computing foundation (core) to provide research-oriented advanced studies in computing (breadth) with a focus (depth) on Data Science. To enroll in the program, students have to have completed a bachelor's degree that included courses in procedural and object-oriented programming, data structures, applied discrete mathematics, databases, and computer networks. The core courses include research methods, information assurance, and a practicum experience. The breadth includes courses such as data mining, user experience design, data visualization, and information retrieval. The data science depth includes courses such as data analytics, machine learning, and programming for data science. Students can choose between a Thesis option and a Non-Thesis option. Both options entail working under the direct supervision of a computing graduate faculty to produce research outcomes that demonstrate mastery of data science.

 

 

 

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Information Systems Program (MS)

The Information Systems Program for the M.S. in Computer and Information Sciences is built on a computing foundation (core) to provide research-oriented advanced studies in computing (breadth) with a focus (depth) on Information Systems. To enroll in the program, students have to have completed a bachelor's degree that included courses in procedural and object-oriented programming, data structures, applied discrete mathematics, databases, and computer networks. The core courses include research methods, information assurance, and a practicum experience. The breadth includes courses such as software quality assurance, software requirement engineering, IT management, and data analytics. The information systems depth includes courses such as engineering of software, web engineering, and interface design and implementation. Students can choose between a Thesis option and a Non-Thesis option. Both options entail working under the direct supervision of a computing graduate faculty to produce research outcomes that demonstrate mastery of information systems. 

 

 

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