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OCOH- Select Publications

Sexually transmitted infections among first-generation college students. American Journal of Sexuality Education

Background

Because of the social and systemic barriers encountered by first-generation college students, this population is at risk for poorer health outcomes. However, there is no identified research investigating whether this includes sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The aim of the study was to identify whether first-generation students were more likely than non-first-generation students to report a history of STIs.

 

Zeglin, R., Merten, J. W. & Niemela, D.* (2020). Sexually transmitted infections among first-generation college students. American Journal of Sexuality Education. doi.org/10.1080/15546128.2020.1816240

Total body skin examination adherence among young adults with an increased risk for skin cancer

Abstract

Although ultraviolent radiation exposure and skin cancer rates are rising in the US, there is not a consistent national message calling for routine total body skin examinations (TBSE) by a healthcare provider. This pilot study examined TBSE rates among adults at an increased risk for skin cancer (history of sunburn, indoor tanning use, excessive UV exposure, poor sunscreen use). Overall skin cancer prevention behaviors were insufficient among respondents (n=953) and only a quarter of respondents considered at an increased risk for skin cancer reported a TBSE. White, older students with light skin who regularly use sunscreen were significantly more likely to report a TBSE. These findings highlight the need for a national study examining TBSE across the lifespan among high-risk individuals.

 

Merten, J. W., King, J. L., & Largo-Wight, E. (2017). Research letter: Total body skin examination adherence among young adults with an increased risk for skin cancer. Dermatology Online Journal, 23(6), 22-23. doi:_35401http://escholarship.org/uc/item/4sd7h2dn

Lifestyle factors associated with sunscreen use among young adults. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine

Background

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States with melanoma rates increasing. Sunscreen use is an effective way to protect the skin and reduce skin cancer risk. Limited research has been conducted examining the relationship between sunscreen use and other lifestyle factors. Interventions aimed at multiple lifestyle factors have shown promise for prevention and reduced health care costs

 

Merten, J. W., King, J. L., Vilaro, M. J., & Largo-Wight, E. (2016). Lifestyle factors associated with sunscreen use among young adults. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, doi:10.1007/s13187-016-1093-3

Skin cancer prevention behaviors among Northeast Florida college students

Background

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States with over three million people diagnosed annually. Melanoma rates in the past 40 years have increased 800% in women and 400% in men under the age of 39. Ultraviolet radiation is directly linked with the development of skin cancer; moreover, young adults are the most active age group engaging in risky UV exposure. This study seeks to extend scientific understanding of skin cancer prevention behaviors among college students.

 

Merten, J. W. (2015). Skin cancer prevention behaviors among Northeast Florida college students. Florida Public Health Review, 12, 23-30.

Our Campus, Our Health: A Model for Undergraduate Health Education Research Engagement

Abstract

Research experience prepares undergraduate students for graduate school, a competitive job market, and their future as the next generation of leaders in public health education. This article describes a model, Our Campus, Our Health, to engage undergraduate students in the delivery of a college health behavior assessment. Through this project, students oversee data analysis, disseminate the findings to stakeholders, and use health communication strategies to promote health behavior change. The project showcases health education as an exciting career choice, provides a valuable resource for the entire campus, and student researchers gain hands-on experience in Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) responsibilities.

 

Merten, J. W. & Johnson, D. (2014). Our campus, our health: A model for undergraduate health education research engagement. Journal of Health Education Teaching, 5(1), 14-19.