John H Parmelee

Chair/Professor

Communication • College of Arts & Sciences

Areas of Expertise

Political communication, political Twitter use, mixed method research designs

Education

• Ph.D. in mass communication, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., 2001.
• M.S., Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, New York, 1993.
• B.S., James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Va., 1992. Major: political science; minor: communication.
 

Biography

After working as a reporter for Congressional Quarterly and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine, I went back to school to get a doctorate and do political communication research.

 

My research area for more than a decade has been how technology impacts political communication. My previous published articles and books have examined the use of technology (including videotapes, DVDs, and the Web) by politicians and political information gatherers. My political communication research also contributes to the field of mixed methods research designs. Using multiple methods within a single study allows you to make inferences from what is found in the many methods and provides for a broader understanding of what is being studied.

 

My newest book, Politics and the Twitter Revolution (Lexington Books, 2012), explores how Twitter is influencing governing and campaigning. In addition, I am the author of Meet the Candidate Videos (Praeger, 2003) I have published my research articles in Political Communication, Communication Studies, Communication Quarterly, Telematics and Informatics, Journal of Mixed Methods Research, Encyclopedia of Political Communication, Central European Journal of Communication, Atlantic Journal of Communication, and Florida Communication Journal.

Awards

• Winner, 2006 Florida Communication Association Outstanding Scholar Award.

• Winner, 2001 Outstanding Graduate Student Teacher award from the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and Communications

Grants and Contracts Awarded

• Awarded UNF Academic Affairs Faculty Development Research Grant, worth $7,500.

Publications & Presentations

Books
Parmelee, J. H., & Bichard, S. L. (2012). Politics and the Twitter Revolution: How tweets influence the relationship between political leaders and the public. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
• Link to book: https://rowman.com/ISBN/9780739165003
Parmelee, J. H. (2003). Meet the candidate videos: Analyzing presidential primary campaign videocassettes. Westport, CT: Praeger.
• Link to book: http://www.amazon.com/Meet-Candidate-Videos-Videocassettes-Communication/dp/0275977374#reader_0275977374
Godin, S., & Parmelee, J. H. (1998). If you’re clueless about financial planning and want to know more. Chicago: Dearborn Financial Publishing.

 

Journal Articles
Parmelee, J. H., & Perkins, S. C. (2012). Exploring social and psychological factors that influence the gathering of political information online. Telematics and Informatics, 29, 90-98.
• Link to article: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736585310000808
Parmelee, J. H., Davies, J., & McMahan, C. (2011). The rise of non-traditional site use for online political information. Communication Quarterly, 59, 625-640.
• Link to article: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01463373.2011.614211
Parmelee, J. H. (2009). Media pluralism by default: The case of Moldova. Central European Journal of Communication, 2, 279-293.
• Link to article: http://www.cejc.ptks.pl/pliki/loi_v2n2.pdf
Parmelee, J. H. (2009). “A better man for a better America:” Presidential campaign films as a mirror of society. Atlantic Journal of Communication, 17, 88-100.
• Link to article: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15456870802701378
Parmelee, J. H. (2008). Meet the (ideal) candidate: How viewers interpret political advertising during the “invisible primary.” Communication Studies, 59, 68-83.
• Link to article: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10510970701849404
Parmelee, J. H., Perkins, S., & Sayre, J. (2007). “What about people our age?” Applying qualitative and quantitative methods to uncover how political ads alienate college students. Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1, 183-199.
• Link to article: http://mmr.sagepub.com/content/1/2/183.short
Parmelee, J. H. (2006). Examining “meet the candidate videos” at the gubernatorial level. Florida Communication Journal, 34, 82-93.
Parmelee, J. H. (2006). Understanding symbolism in magazine coverage of President Reagan. Florida Communication Journal, 34, 54-69.
Parmelee, J. H. (2002). Presidential primary videocassettes: How candidates in the 2000 U.S. presidential primary elections framed their early campaigns. Political Communication, 19, 317-331.
• Link to article: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01957470290055529
Parmelee, J. H. (2000). Examining presidential campaign films at the primary and general election level: Clinton in 1992 and Dole in 1996. Florida Communication Journal, 27, 80-92.

 

Book Chapters and Collected Articles
Parmelee, J. H., & Perkins, S. (in press). Discourse: Mixed methods. In Carol A. Chapelle (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
Parmelee, J. H. (2008). Candidate films, biographical. In Lynda Lee Kaid & Christina Holtz-Bacha (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Political Communication (pp. 83-85). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Parmelee, J. H. (2003). Images from the modern era of presidential campaign films: 1984-2000. In Peter C. Rollins (Ed.), 2001-2002 Film & History CD-ROM Annual (pp. 1-22). Cleveland, OK: Film and History League.

 

Conference Papers
Parmelee, J. H. (2009). Media pluralism by default: The case of Moldova. Paper presented to the International Communication Association, Chicago, Ill.
Parmelee, J. H., Perkins, S., & Sayre, J. (2006). “What about people our age?” Using framing theory to uncover how political ads alienate college students. Paper presented to the International Communication Association, Dresden, Germany.
Parmelee, J. H. (2006). Lost in transition: Moldovan journalism during the last 15 years. Paper presented to the International Communication Association, Dresden, Germany.
Parmelee, J. H. (2005). Framing the candidates: How President Bush and Senator Kerry were portrayed during campaign 2004. Paper presented to the Hawaii International Conference on Social Sciences, Honolulu, Hawaii.
Parmelee, J. H. (2005). How voters interpret “meet the candidate videos.” Paper presented to the International Communication Association, New York, N.Y.
Parmelee, J. H. (2003). The transitional press in a former Soviet republic: The case of Moldova. Paper presented to the International Communication Association, San Diego, Calif.
Parmelee, J. H. (2003). The framing of Janet Reno and Bill McBride during the early days of the 2002 Florida governor’s race. Paper presented to the Southern States Communication Association, Birmingham, Ala.
Parmelee, J. H. (2001). The rise of videocassette advertising in presidential primaries: 1980-1996. Paper presented to the American Journalism Historians Association, San Diego, Calif.
Parmelee, J. H. (2000). Images from the modern era of presidential campaign films: 1984-1996. Paper presented to The American Presidency on Film: A National Conference, sponsored by the Film and History League and Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Film and Television Studies. Simi Valley, Calif.
Parmelee, J. H. (2000). Presidential primary campaign communication from 1992 to 2000: Exploring the candidates’ direct mail videos. Paper presented to the Florida Communication Association convention, Gainesville, Fla.
Parmelee, J. H. (2000). Presidential primary 2000 videocassettes: A framing study. Paper presented to the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Phoenix, Ariz.
Parmelee, J. H. (1999). The influence of symbols in the press coverage of President Reagan’s first 100 days in office: A look at Time, The Nation and National Review. Paper presented to the American Journalism Historians Association, Portland, Ore.
Parmelee, J. H. (1999). Examining presidential campaign films at the primary and general election level: Clinton in 1992 and Dole in 1996. Paper presented to the Florida Communication Association convention, Ocala, Fla.
 

ParmeleeContact Information

Building 014D, Room 2035

(904) 620-3867

jparmele@unf.edu