President John A. Delaney's Biography

President John A. Delaney headshotJohn A. Delaney became the University of North Florida's fifth president in 2003. In that capacity, he oversees a campus of more than 16,000 students, 600 faculty and more than 1,000 staff. The 1,381 acre campus in Northeast Florida is considered a driver in the region, with an annual economic impact of nearly $1 billion. Each year, 4,000 students graduate from the university's five colleges: the Brooks College of Health, the Coggin College of Business, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Computing, Engineering and Construction and the College of Education and Human Services.

Under John A. Delaney’s direction, UNF reaffirmed its commitment to students, by offering individualized attention and offering transformational learning opportunities. The University of North Florida is also known for its flagship programs, areas where UNF leads the nation. Flagships include Community Nursing, International Business, Transportation & Logistics, Coastal Biology, Music and Nutrition.

UNF is currently undergoing the biggest construction spree in its history. Within the last few years, the university opened the Osprey Fountains residence hall, the Student Union, the College of Education and Human Services building, the Biological Science Building, the Student Wellness Complex and Osprey Commons, with a new cafeteria. All new construction on campus reflects UNF’s commitment to the environment and many new buildings are LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) certified.

John A. Delaney is considered UNF’s chief fundraiser, nearly doubling the university’s privately funded endowment. In April 2013, the Power of Transformation campaign exceeded its goal, raising more than $130 million. The campaign was publicly launched in 2009 with an ambitious goal of $110 million.

John A. Delaney’s presidency continues a distinguished career as a public servant. He served two terms as mayor of Jacksonville, the country’s 13th largest city, spearheading major initiatives including The Better Jacksonville Plan, a $2.2 billion improvement plan that gave the city new public facilities and other amenities. He also created the Preservation Project, a massive land conservation program giving Jacksonville the distinction of having the largest urban park system in the United States. Prior to that, he served as the chief assistant state attorney, the number two prosecutor for Northeast Florida and as the general counsel for the City of Jacksonville. He has served on numerous non-profit and corporate boards.

He and his wife Gena have four children and twin grandsons.