Legal

Interpreter Training

 
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Foundations of Interpreting in the American Legal System

January 23-25, 2009, Jacksonville, Florida

Friday 11:00 am - 5:00 pm / Saturday & Sunday 8:30 am - 4:00 pm

CEUs Available:  2.0 Professional Studies CEUs offered, Instructional Level: Little/None

Registration Fees: “Early” (postmarked 1/1/09) $275; “Just in Time” (postmarked after 1/1/09) $300;  “All 3” Combo (attending all trainings, paid for together):  $1125


Presented by

Sharon Caserta, Esquire, CSC, SC:L (Jacksonville Area Legal Aid)

Len Roberson, Ph.D.; CI and CT (University of North Florida)


Interpreting in legal settings is quite different from other interpreting.  There are great differences in language, protocol, qualifications, roles and risks.  This workshop has been designed for certified interpreters who want to have a thorough introduction to legal interpreting. Through a variety of instructional methods including lecture, small group discussions and interactions, role play, and case study analysis, participants will gain an understanding of the process of interpreting in the legal system by examining the legal right to an interpreter, the context of legal interpreting, the legal system in general, the roles and responsibilities of the legal interpreter, protocol for interpreting in various legal settings, and the role of preparation for legal interpreting assignments. 


After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:  1) Understand the legal foundation for the right to an interpreter; 2) identify qualifications of an interpreter in the legal context; 3) Explore attitudes and behaviors that influence the role and responsibilities of a court interpreter; 4) Identify and explain federal, state and local system of the judicial system; and 4) Compare the various roles and responsibilities of courtroom personnel.


For the Foundations of Interpreting in the American Legal System, participants must hold national certification by RID (either CSC, CI and CT, any level of NIC or NAD Levels IV or V).  Deaf interpreters who have working experience as an interpreter may also attend and will need to submit references for recent work experience.


Interpreting in Florida’s Legal System:

An Examination of Best Practice and National Standards

March 7-11, 2009 – Florida Coastal School of Law, Jacksonville, Florida

8:00 am - 5:00 pm Daily

CEUs Available  : 3.5 Professional Studies CEUs offered; Instructional Level Some

Registration Fees: “Early” (postmarked 2/6/09) $450; “Just in Time” (postmarked after 2/7/09) $475;  “All 3” Combo (attending all trainings, paid for together):  $1125


Facilitated by

Jan DeLap, CDI (Maryland); 

Sharon Caserta, Esquire, CSC, CI & CT, SC:L (Jacksonville Area Legal Aid)

Len Roberson, Ph.D.;  CI and CT (University of North Florida)


Designed to be both engaging and interactive, this 5-Day training will examine interpreting in the legal settings with special emphasis on Florida’s legal system.  Interpreting in both civil and criminal actions will be explored with particular focus on both process and language.  A highlight of the training will be an experiential component that takes participants into real courtrooms to observe legal exchanges followed by facilitated discussions of what was seen and implications for interpreters. 


Although facilitated by two individuals, an attorney/interpreter and an interpreter/interpreter educator, during the training, participants will learn from a wide variety of instructors including attorneys, experienced interpreters, law enforcement officers, Deaf interpreters, and judges (to name a few).  Topics presented will include:  1) Introduction to Florida’s Legal System; 2) Review of the Roles, Responsibilities, and Ethics of Interpreting; 3) An overview of Preparation Strategies; 4) Legal Vocabulary (both English and ASL); Overview of the Criminal Justice System (including function of the interpreter); 5) Overview of the Civil Justice System (including function of the interpreter); 6) Witness Interpreting; Interpreting for Law Enforcement; 7) Working with Deaf Interpreters


For the Intermediate Legal Interpreter Training, participants must hold national certification (either RID CSC, CI and CT, any level of NIC or NAD Levels IV or V) (excluding Deaf participants – for whom certification is not necessary) and have had prior, formal training in “Foundations of Legal/Court Interpreting” of at least 15 hours (required of all participants – Deaf and hearing).  Please submit a letter detailing your legal experience & legal training along with your registration form.




Part I:  Thursday & Friday

Preparation Strategies for Court Interpreters

March 12-15, 2009 – Florida Coastal School of Law, Jacksonville, Florida

8:00 am - 4:00 pm Daily

CEUs Available:  2.4 Professional Studies CEUs offered (part I and II), Instructional Level: Intensive

Registration Fees: “Early” (postmarked 2/7/09) $450; “Just in Time” (postmarked after 2/7/09) $475;  “All 3” Combo (attending all trainings, paid for together):  $1125


Presented by

Carla M. Mathers, Esquire, CSC, SC:L

Court Interpreter Training Resources

&

Jan DeLap, CDI, Maryland


Preparation in legal assignments is more than a good idea, it is the interpreter's obligation.  Court interpreters take an oath to interpret accurately all of the proceedings in court, and if one interprets an assignment without adequate preparation, the oath can be violated. Unfortunately, the Courts and attorneys do not make the interpreter's job easy.  This seminar will assist interpreters identify the preparation required for various legal assignments.  Participants will analyze preparation materials along a continuum from the basic information one must have and without which an assignment should not be accepted to the preparation materials that an interpreter would have access to and study in an ideal setting.  Participants will receive hands on practice seeking preparation materials from attorneys, judges, deaf parties, and court personnel and will work with the materials after they are received in small groups, large groups and in role-plays.  After an in-depth discussion of all aspects of preparing for a legal assignment, participants will work in groups with hypothetical legal assignments from beginning to end as if they were preparing for an assignment in actuality. Participants will have the opportunity to fully debrief after the hypothetical situations are completed and to receive feedback and analysis from their peers and the presenter with respect to successful and less successful strategies. 


Part II:  Saturday & Sunday

Mock Criminal Trial:  Putting it All Together



Interpreters need practical experience interpreting legal texts. The previous work in this series leads up to the final session in which participants will work as teams in the interpretation of a criminal trial. Participants will have the opportunity to prepare with the parties and attorneys for the trial, interpret and de-brief with the parties after the conclusion of the case.


For the Preparation Strategies and Mock Criminal Trial, Participants must hold national certification (either RID CSC, CI and CT, any level of NIC or NAD Levels IV or V) (excluding Deaf participants) and have taken an introductory course on court interpretation (required of all participants – Deaf and hearing).  The course should have been one intensive (at least 20 hours of instruction) course. Participants should have experience in trial work that must include experience in proceedings interpreting. Experience with table interpreting and/or training in table interpreting and interpreting Deaf witness testimony is preferred. Please submit a letter detailing your legal experience & legal training along with your registration form.


 

Spring 2009 Training Series