Questions Forwarded Pending Responses

October 4, 2012

 QUESTIONER:  

 DATE ASKED:

 FORWARDED TO:  

 George Candler  

 

 September 6, 2012  

 

Associate Provost Bobby Waldrup
Academic Affairs

 
 

 QUESTION SYNOPSIS:

 Apparently when we do summer budgets, we allocate x dollars to pay for faculty to teach summer classes. These classes then generate tuition revenue, which I'll call y. The problem seems to be that y and x do not interact. To take the graduate program I teach in (the MPA): we average 20+ students for our classes. To put me in front of that class will have a marginal cost of maybe $10k, at 12.5% of my salary, plus retirement contribution (no extra health costs are incurred), and a bit of electricity. Yet with 20 graduate students at tuition of $1272 each, the marginal revenue generated by this class is over $25k. We only offered three MPA classes this summer due to budget constraints, rather than our usual four. I've no doubt (student numbers are healthy) that we left $15k (revenue of $25k - cost of $10k) on the table. If the revenue side of the equation was added to the cost, we would be able to make less harmful decisions about how many classes we can 'afford' to offer.

 

 

 

Written Responses to Questions

 QUESTIONER-I:

DATE ASKED:

WRITTEN RESPONSES:  

George Candler

 

March 1, 2012

 

Marianne Jaffee
Executive Assistant to
the Provost & Director of Planning

 
 
 QUESTION SYNOPSIS-I: 
The faculty list of WebPages needs to be updated and current. Is someone maintaining this and if so who should they talk to?

 

 QUESTIONER-II:

DATE ASKED:

WRITTEN RESPONSES:   

Jeffrey Harrison

 

June 7, 2012

 

Lauren Newton, Chair
Campus Technology Committee

 
 
 QUESTION SYNOPSIS-II: 

At Jeff Harrison’s request the following question from yesterday’s Faculty Association meeting is being forwarded to your committee to take a look at and respond to. The question came from Kathleen Delaney, Senior Student Government Advisorand the text of her question is as follows:

 
I’m writing with a request for information on the use of scantrons by faculty members for tests and exams. As you may know, Student Government gives out free scantrons to the student body and at present, there are five different scantrons being used: red, green, brown, red, and blue. I was wondering if individual faculty members determine which scantrons are used, or if it is up to each Department or the Faculty Association.

 

 

QUESTIONER-III:

DATE ASKED:

WRITTEN RESPONSES:   

Anonymous  

 

June 7, 2012  

 

Jeffrey Coker
Undergraduate Dean Office of the
Undergraduate Studies

 
 
QUESTION SYNOPSIS-III: 
To justify incoming freshman living on campus, UNF is citing data claiming that freshman who live on campus do better than those who do not. While I do not dispute that such may be true average, I doubt that such data exists for schools such as UNF that are public, located in a suburban area of a large city, and have a freshman profile such as ours. That is, it makes no sense to compare us to Princeton, Stetson, Iowa, or Wayne State, just to name a few schools that differ from UNF.
In addition, I question whether such studies are prospective or prove causality. That is, would a particular freshman's performance really be improved by living on campus? Or are there self-selection biases that explain the differences in performance?
 

 

QUESTIONER-IV:  

DATE ASKED:  

WRITTEN RESPONSE:

Anonymous

 

June 7, 2012

 

Jeffrey Coker
Undergraduate Dean
Office of the Undergraduate Studies

 

QUESTION SYNOPSIS-IV:

Are you aware of the UC Irvine study based on 2005 freshman stating:  

For most of the variables in this study, there were no discernable differences between those who lived on campus their first year (residents) and those who commuted to campus (commuters). They were similar in terms of gender, ethnicity, average SAT scores, most college goals, self-reported academic gains, and quarterly and cumulative GPAs in the first year.

 

 

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