Agenda Item FA 14-30

Submitted by the Academic Programs Committee

College of Education and Human Services (Undergraduate)- (Exceptional, Deaf, & Interpreter Education)

New Courses & Change of Programs of Study (1 package)

09/04/14: Passed

09/14/14: Approved

Log Number: 201401-64

Exceptional, Deaf, and Interpreter Education – Undergraduate


Add a new concentration to an existing program
Bachelor of Science - ASL/English Interpreting Major Community Interpreting Concentration

 

Summary of the Changes:   

The existing BS degree program is expanding to include a pathway for native UNF students to enter the traditional

2 + 2 transfer model. Prior to this concentration, all students who take American Sign Language as second language at UNF and are interested in becoming an interpreter must leave UNF, go to local two-year interpreting program (FSCJ), and return to UNF for last two years. This concentration allows UNF to retain students and recruit students who want to pursue four-year Interpreting degree program at UNF. APC action includes adding five new courses: English to ASL Sight Translation, Interpreting Field Experience, Interpreting in Community Settings, Discourse Analysis, Introduction to Interpreting. 
 (Click here for the program of study)   

 

Add a new course

Introduction to Interpreting (3 crs)

INT

Freshman (1xxx)

000

Prerequisites:    
None  

Co-requisites:    
None   

Course Description:

The course provides an overview of diverse settings in which interpreters work and the array of consumers who utilize interpreting services. Students are introduced to historical foundations of interpreting, models for interpreter role and function, ethics and professional conduct, applicable state and federal legislation, interpreter credentialing, and business practices. ASL is not required as a prerequisite for this knowledge-based introduction to the field of ASL/English interpreting.

 

Add a new course

English to ASL Sight Translation (3 crs)

INT

Sophomore (2xxx)

XXX

Prerequisites:    
"INT1000: Introduction to Interpreting"
AND "ASL2150: American Sign Language II"
AND "ENC1101: (GW) Rhetoric and Writing"
  

Co-requisites:    
None   

Course Description:

Prerequisites: ASL2150 American Sign Language II, ENC1101 Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing, INT1000 Introduction to Interpreting; Interpreting Program admission or permission of Program Director. This interactive and practical course introduces sight translation for signed language interpreters as a foundational skill for conveying meaning-based, cross-cultural access to frozen texts. Students will work between American Sign Language (ASL) and English to apply such translation features as cohesion, discourse markers, spatial mapping, involvement strategies, and framing to meaning transfer of source texts. Students will develop self-analysis and peer-analysis techniques for evaluating message equivalence of sight translations. This course emphasizes cultural and linguistic literacy and ethical constraints associated with the translation process.  

 

Add a new course

Discourse Analysis (3 crs)

INT

Sophomore (2xxx)

XXX

Prerequisites:    
"INT1000: Introduction to Interpreting"
AND "ASL2150: American Sign Language II"
AND "ENC1101: (GW) Rhetoric and Writing"
  

Co-requisites:     

None   

Course Description:

Prerequisites: ASL2150 American Sign Language II, ENC1101 Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing, INT1000 Introduction to Interpreting; Interpreting Program admission or permission of Program Director. This course introduces discourse analysis to deepen student awareness of and appreciation for various discourse norms and strategies used in English and American Sign Language (ASL). Students will study general discourse types, including conversations, presentations, and narratives specific to ASL and English. Students will study speech act theory and pragmatics in order to identify features of cohesion, coherence, politeness, and powerful/powerless language in oral, written, and signed texts. Students will learn how to identify the function of intent, discourse markers, rhythm, prosody, and space. Discourse structures and genres, gender differences, and framing will also be addressed. The course emphasizes relevance to meaning-based cross cultural communication.  

 

Add a new course

Interpreting Field Experience       ( 4 crs)

INT

Sophomore (2xxx)

XXX

Prerequisites:    
"ASL2150: American Sign Language II"
AND "ENC1101: (GW) Rhetoric and Writing"
AND "INT1000: Introduction to Interpreting"
  

Co-requisites:    
None   

Course Description:

Prerequisites: ASL2150 American Sign Language II, ENC1101 Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing, INT1000 Introduction to Interpreting; Interpreting Program admission or permission of Program Director. This course will introduce students to a variety of environments where interpreting services might be provided. Through observation, shadowing, and community involvement, students will gain an understanding of the human dynamics and linguistic variations in a wide scope of settings that include meetings, classrooms, inservice trainings, one-on-one interactions, and public forums. Students will apply the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct to setting evaluations and use the Demand-Control Schema to shape discussions of context-specific dynamics and decisions. The course emphasizes cultural literacy and requires 100 hours of field-based experience under the supervision of a faculty advisor.

 

Add a new course

Interpreting in Community Settings (3 crs)

INT

Sophomore (2xxx)

XXX

Prerequisites:    
"ASL2150: American Sign Language II"
AND "ENC1101: (GW) Rhetoric and Writing"
AND "INT1000: Introduction to Interpreting"
  

Co-requisites:    
None   

Course Description:

Prerequisites: ASL2150 American Sign Language II, ENC1101 Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing, INT1000 Introduction to Interpreting; Interpreting Program admission or permission of Program Director. This course provides an introduction to a range of settings where interpreters work and teaches students to determine appropriate use of consecutive and simultaneous interpreting. Students learn terminology, register, and protocols for interpreting in specialty areas, including vocational rehabilitation, healthcare, social service, employment, and education. This course provides a foundation for using the Demand-Control Schema during communication assessment and evaluation of consumer needs, with respect for linguistic and cultural diversity.