Agenda Item FA 11-39

Submitted by the Academic Programs Committee

COAS (Undergraduate) - Chemistry, English, Sociology & Anthropology

New Courses, Course Changes, & Program changes (5 packages)

09/01/11: Passed

09/09/11: Approved

Log Number: 201101-25

College of Arts and Sciences (Undergraduate)

Chemistry - Undergraduate

 

 

Terminate an existing course

Advanced Organic Chemistry

CHM

Senior (4xxx)

260C

This is a request to terminate CHM 4260C Advanced Organic Chemistry (4 credits), a major elective in all chemistry degrees. It is being replaced by a lecture-only, junior-level version of the same course, in another request included in this package. This replacement course will be CHM 3260 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 credits). 
This change affects tracks in the Department of Chemistry only. This termination of a 4-credit elective course is accompanied by another APC request for a new 3-credit elective course in the same subject. This change reduces the credit hours students may earn in one of their possible electives. However, the total number of major electives do not change in any of these programs of study. Therefore students electing the new 3-credit course must make sure to take enough elective credits to fulfill the major electives. 
The justification for eliminating the lab component is that laboratory experiences for this course are better accomplished by undergraduate research experiences, and that most advanced organic electives at other institutions do not require a lab. The justification for the change from senior to junior level are twofold. First, the course has only a 2xxx-level prerequisite (sophomore level), and second, the Academic Roadmap for all chemistry degrees requires some major electives be taken at the junior level, and this course number indicates to students that they may take it as juniors. 

Add a new course

Advanced Organic Chemistry (3crs)

CHM

Junior(3xxx)

260

Prerequisites:   
CHM2211: Organic Chemistry II
Co-requisites:
None
Course Description: 
The course covers structural/mechanistic and synthetic aspects of organic chemistry, focusing on both fundamental/classical concepts and contemporary topics. Classical topics include bonding and molecular structure, stereochemical and conformational aspects, structure-reactivity relationships, kinetic isotope effect, substitution, addition-elimination, reactive intermediates, aromaticity and aromatic chemistry. Contemporary topics include modern synthetic methods and reagents, concerted reactions, ligand-coupling reactions, retrosynthetic analysis, and targeted synthesis.

 

Log Number: 201101-4

(Undergraduate)

English - Undergraduate

 

Add a new minor

British Literature Minor

 

Summary of the Changes:

The department requests to add a British Literature minor for students who wish to increase their knowledge of important British authors, texts, and contexts. Students with aspirations toward fully understanding and appreciating the English-language literary tradition from its origins to the present will be well served by this minor, as will students who wish to develop critical reading and writing abilities necessary for graduate study of literature as well as law, business, and other fields in which a clear comprehension of complex rhetoric and communication is essential. The British Literature minor will be especially attractive to English majors, majors in other overlapping areas in the humanities such as History and Philosophy, and all students with interdisciplinary interests that include literature. 
Rationale: The department is revising its major and minor curriculum this year. The British Literature minor will add to a menu of options for both majors and non-majors. Currently, department majors do not have this option. This option will allow students to gain specialized knowledge in British Literature. 
TOTAL HOURS: 15 CREDITS.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

Log Number: 201101-5

English - Undergraduate


Change a degree-major of an existing program

BA - English Major

 

Summary of the Changes:

The department requests changing its major requirements for the BA in English. 
Rationale: The proposed changes in the requirements for the major will give students additional skill-based coursework in which they develop the ability to read literary texts closely-that is, analytically, critically, and with appreciation for the aesthetic features of these texts. 
a. The requirements for six hours of literary interpretation, criticism, and/or theory will give students additional experience in practical literary criticism. 
b. The requirement for six hours of coursework in either Literature in/as Performance or Writing Studies will provide students with the opportunity to develop or further develop: 
- the ability to distinguish between language as a vehicle of meaning and language as performance; 
- the ability to recognize, analyze, and explain the significance of the performative dimensions of literary language; 
- advanced writing skills. 
c. The current categories - Literature in Context, Literary Type, and Literary Medium - do not accurately identify the programmatic character of the courses that are listed in each category. Therefore, eliminating these categories in favor of the above new requirements will enhance the programmatic coherence of our major. 
d. We are shifting the requirement for coursework in early and later periods of British and American literature from a requirement for the major to a requirement of our new minors in (i) British Literature and (ii) American Literature. 
e. We have added to the requirement for a capstone experience the option of a directed independent study. This new option will enable the department to begin a pilot assessment project of longitudinally tracking the learning of individual students. 
CREDIT HOURS REMAIN AT 30 FOR THE BA in ENGLISH
(Click here to view the Program of study)

Log Number: 201101-15

Sociology and Anthropology - Undergraduate


Change a degree-major of an existing program

BA- Anthropology Major

 

Summary of the Changes:

The Anthropology program seeks to further develop our required 3000-level courses in the major to resolve issues identified (both informally and through formal outcomes assessment practices) with student learning throughout the curriculum. Specifically, we are adding two new 3000-level courses (ANT 3xxx Fundamentals of Archaeology and ANT 3xxx Principles of Socio-Cultural Anthropology. We further seek to provide additional flexibility to our majors in terms of their capstone theory course. Finally, we seek to reduce the number of Foreign Culture (FC) courses Anthropology majors may take to fulfill elective requirements. 
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 

Add a new course

Fundamentals of Archaeology (3crs)

ANT

Junior(3xxx)

XXX

Prerequisites: 
None 
Co-requisites:
 
None 
Course Description:
Archaeology is one of the four fundamental sub-fields of Anthropology in the United States. This course covers the fundamental analytical methods that have been and are currently employed by archaeologists to reconstruct past life ways, cultures, and societies. In particular, this course will explore the material culture studies and other evidence used by archaeologists. Topics of inquiry include excavation procedures, sites survey, dating techniques, site formation processes, paleo-environmental reconstruction, artifact analysis, and key laboratory techniques. Additionally, the course will cover the history of archaeological legislation and regulations that apply to public archaeology, ethical principles of archaeological practice, and the basics of curation and museumology. Finally throughout the semester, we will explore the importance and relevance of archaeology to the modern world.

Add a new course

Principles of Socio-Cultural Anthropology (3crs)

ANT

Junior (3xxx)

XXX

Prerequisites: 
None 
Co-requisites: 
None 
Course Description: 
This course introduces students to the study of sociocultural anthropology, one of the subfields of general anthropology. It presents students with the interpretive frameworks and concepts needed to understand the impact of groups and their cultures upon the individual. This course aims to show the ways in which local and global cultural processes intersect and questions understandings of culture as homogeneous and discrete. This course also gives examples of some of the ways in which anthropology can be used to address some of humanity's problems such as racism, sexism, growing economic inequality, development, globalization, displacement, and environmental troubles. Finally, this course aims to present anthropology as a discipline that by embracing a bottom-up perspective contributes to enhance self-understanding and dialogue across culturally and socially diverse publics. 

Log Number: 201101-16

Sociology and Anthropology - Undergraduate

 

Change an existing minor

Anthropology Minor

 

Summary of the Changes:

The Anthropology program seeks to make our minor requirements more flexible to potential minors. To do so, we propose to eliminate the requirement that students take 3 core ANT courses and propose to allow minors to take any five (5) ANT courses at the 3000 or 4000 level. In addition, we are proposing to limit the number of Foreign Culture (FC) minors can take to satisfy the minor in order to draw students to more intensive Anthropology electives that are not designed for a mass audience.

(Click here to view the Program of study)