Agenda Item FA 09-28

Submitted by the Academic Programs Committee

Biology, Chemistry, English, International Studies, Mathematics & Statistics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Sociology & Anthropology): New Courses, Courses Changes, & Programs of Study (94 items)

12/03/09: Passed

12/09/09: Approved

College of Arts and Sciences (Undergraduate)

Undergraduate- Biology
 
09/10-051
APC 2
BSC 2085C
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
The course description is being changed by adding information about the use of animals in the laboratory. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

This course includes units concerning the organization of the human body, support and movement, the nervous system and special senses, and the endocrine system. The laboratory involves dissection of preserved animals. (A laboratory fee of $30 will be assessed.)

 
09/10-052
APC 2
BSC 2086C
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
The course description is being changed by adding information about the use of animals in the laboratory. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

This course is a continuation of BSC 2085C. The course includes units concerning the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, lymphatic and immune systems, digestion and metabolism, the urinary system and fluid and electrolyte balance, and reproduction and development. The laboratory involves dissection of preserved animals. (A laboratory fee of $30 will be assessed.)

 
09/10-053
APC 2
ZOO 4454C
Ichthyology
A disclaimer is being added to the course description indicating that this course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

Ichthyology is the study of fishes. Topics covered during this course include anatomy, physiology, taxonomic diversity, life history, and ecology of fishes. Different techniques for the study of fishes will be introduced during the laboratory. The laboratory involves experimentation with living animals and/or dissection of preserved animals. (A laboratory fee of $30 will be assessed.)

 
09/10-054
APC 2
ZOO 2203C
Invertebrate Biology

A disclaimer is being added to the course description indicating that this course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.

New Course Description:

This course represents a survey of the invertebrate phyla ranging from the protozoa through the lower chordata, emphasizing comparative aspects of morphology, embryology as well as ecology and distribution. This course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals.

 
09/10-055
APC 2
ZOO 3733C
Human Structure and Function
We are adding a disclaimer to the course description about the use of preserved animals in the laboratory. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

A systematic approach will be used to study the structural and functional anatomy of the human body. Tissues, organs, and internal processes of systems (i.e. circulatory, excretory, and reproductive) will be examined in a three hour lecture. Normal and abnormal functioning of body processes and associated disorders and diseases will be discussed. Case studies will provide opportunity for integration of studied material. A corresponding four hour laboratory will accompany the lecture to provide visual anatomical identification, including dissections and microscopic slides. This course includes dissection of preserved animals.

 
09/10-056
APC 2
ZOO 4462C
Herpetology
We are adding a disclaimer to the course description about the use of live and preserved animals in the laboratory. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

This course focuses on the natural history of amphibians and reptiles with emphasis on systematic and evolutionary adaptations. The course includes three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory and two hours of field work. This course includes dissection and experimentation on live and/or preserved animals.

 
09/10-057
APC 2
ZOO 4208C
Coastal Invertebrate Biology
A disclaimer is being added to the course description indicating that this course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

This course will include an examination of the diversity, ecology, and evolutionary history of aquatic invertebrates in coastal habitats. Current topics such as sea level rise and pollution of aquatic habitats will be discussed. This course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals.

 
09/10-058
APC 2
ZOO 4753C
Histology
A disclaimer is being added to the course description indicating that this course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

This course focuses on the structure and function of cells, tissues and organs. Students will learn to identify all major cell types and their functions in the human body. Lecture material will be integrated in the lab through histological diagnostics at the light microscope and preparation of microscope slides. The laboratory involves experimentation with living animals and/or dissection of preserved animals. The course includes three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory. (A laboratory fee of $30 will be assessed.)

 
09/10-059
APC 2
PCB 3043C
Ecology
The course description is being changed by adding information about the use of animals in the laboratory. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

This course will focus on the basic principles involved in the functioning of ecological systems, with special reference to the major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of Florida. The laboratory involves experimentation with living animals. The course includes three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory and field work. (A laboratory fee of $30 will be assessed).

 
09/10-060
APC 2
BSC 2012C
General Biology III
The course description is being changed by adding information about the use of animals in the laboratory. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to the diversity and evolution of fungi and animals and the anatomy and physiology of representative taxa. During this course we will look at the tremendous biodiversity that results from the basic building blocks described in General Biology I and II. We will conduct an overview of the major groups of fungi and animals, focusing on unique adaptations and evolutionary origin. We will then examine the development of organs and organ systems in representative groups to provide a comparative view of animal anatomy and physiology. The laboratory involves experimentation with living animals and/or dissection of preserved animals.

 
09/10-061
APC 2
ZOO 4823C
General Entomology
A disclaimer is being added to the course description indicating that this course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

This course will investigate the taxonomy, structure, physiology and ecology of the major evolutionary lineages of the insects. This course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals.

 
09/10-062
APC 2
PCB 4713C
Physiology
A disclaimer is being added to the course description indicating that this course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:

This course focuses on the functional activities and interactions of cells, tissues and organs, with emphasis on respiration, excitation, transport phenomena, and control mechanisms. The course includes three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory. The laboratory involves experimentation with living animals and/or dissection of preserved animals. (A laboratory fee of $30 will be assessed.)

 
09/10-063
APC 2
BSC 4931
Senior Seminar in Biology
This two-hour course is being replaced by two one-hour courses, Senior Seminar Preparation and Senior Seminar Practicum. This change will increase the number of students we are able to serve and better track the number of students each faculty member is responsible for in this course.
 
09/10-064
APC 1
BSC 4XXX
Senior Seminar Preparation (1 cr)
Prerequisites:
A minimum of 11 credit hours of biology courses of 3000 level or above
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course is designed to prepare students to take Senior Seminar Practicum by having them explore potential topics of independent research (field, laboratory or library based). Students will learn how to conduct extensive literature reviews and be trained in various modes of written and oral scientific communication. Professional development training in the form of development of a curriculum vitae and discussion of application to graduate and professional schools will also be included. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-065
APC 1
BSC 4XXX
Senior Seminar Practicum (1 cr)
Prerequisites:
BSC 4XXX - Senior Seminar Preparation and Permission of Instructor
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
Senior Seminar Practicum is the successional course to Senior Seminar Preparation. In this course students will present their topics of independent research (field, laboratory or library based) in a written and oral format. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-066
APC 3
 
BS: Biology Major All Available Tracks

Summary of the Changes:
The Department of Biology is making a change to one of the required courses for all biology majors. The current course, BSC 4931 Senior Seminar, 2 credit hours, is being terminated from the curriculum and replaced by two new courses: BSC 4xxx Senior Seminar Preparation, 1 credit hour, and BSC 4xxx Senior Seminar Practicum, 1 credit hour. This change will increase the number of students we are able to serve with this course each semester and better track the number of students each faculty member is responsible for in this course. The total semester hours are still the same.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
Graduate- Biology
 
09/10-047
APC 2
ZOO 5463C
Advanced Herpetology
We are adding a disclaimer to the course description about the use of live and preserved animals in the laboratory. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:
In this course we will study the biology of two vertebrate classes, the Amphibia and Reptilia. We will consider some critical evolutionary adaptations emphasizing anatomy and physiology of each of these groups, and then survey important members of various families. The first half of the course is devoted to amphibians, and the second half to reptiles. Students will read about a topic, plan a study, collect data, and write a term paper in the field of Herpetology. This course includes dissection and experimentation on live and/or preserved animals.
 
09/10-048
APC 2
ZOO 5455C
Advanced Ichthyology
A disclaimer is being added to the course description indicating that this course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:
Ichthyology is the study of fishes. Topics covered during this course include anatomy, physiology, taxonomic diversity, life history, ecology, and behavior of fishes. Different techniques for the study of fishes will be introduced during the laboratory section. Students will be required to do an independent research project in fish biology. The laboratory involves experimentation with living animals and/or dissection of preserved animals.
 
09/10-049
APC 2
ZOO 5209C
Advanced Coastal Invertebrate Biology
A disclaimer is being added to the course description indicating that this course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:
This course will include an examination of the diversity, ecology, and evolutionary history of aquatic invertebrates in coastal habitats. Current topics such as sea level rise and pollution of aquatic habitats will be discussed. Students will also learn how to collect data on invertebrate diversity and use these data in an environmental bioassessment context. This course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals.
 
09/10-050
APC 2
ZOO 5754C
Advanced Histology
A disclaimer is being added to the course description indicating that this course includes experimentation with living and/or preserved animals. This serves to notify prospective students of requirements of the course to which they may object.
New Course Description:
Students will receive instruction concerning the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organs. Students will learn to recognize and identify all major cell types in the human body. The histology of cell function will be stressed. The course will be three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. The laboratory involves experimentation with living animals and/or dissection of preserved animals
 
09/10-067
APC 2
PCB 5314C
Marine Ecology
We request the course level be changed from 5000 to 6000 for this graduate level course. Thus, this course will require a new course number. Courses with 5000 level designations are cross-listed at the undergraduate level, but this course is not. This course is only offered to graduate students, and our graduate students need to take most of their courses at the 6000 level.
New Course Description:
This course focuses on the distribution and dynamics of marine populations in relation to the physical and chemical environment of the ocean. (Open to certified biology teachers by permission of the instructor.) During the lecture component of this course, learners will read and discuss current primary research articles in broad disciplines of marine ecology, and conduct independent research projects under the faculty leader's guidance. This course includes three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory.
 
09/10-068
APC 3
 
MS: Biology Major All Available Tracks

Summary of the Changes:
The Department of Biology is making a change to one of the graduate level courses. We request the course Marine Ecology (PCB 5314C) be changed from a 5000 level course to a 6000 level course. Courses with 5000 level designations are cross-listed at the undergraduate level, but this course is not. This course is only offered to graduate students, and our graduate students need to take most of their courses at the 6000 level. (Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-069
APC 3
 
MA: Biology Major All Available Tracks

Summary of the Changes:
The Department of Biology is making a change to one of the graduate level courses. We request the course Marine Ecology (PCB 5314C) be changed from a 5000 level course to a 6000 level course. Courses with 5000 level designations are cross-listed at the undergraduate level, but this course is not. This course is only offered to graduate students, and our graduate students need to take most of their courses at the 6000 level.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
Undergraduate- Chemistry
 
09/10-070
APC 3
 
BS: Chemistry Major

Summary of the Changes:
We request the following changes to the curriculum of the traditional B.S. in Chemistry. The major requires 120 credits.
1) removal of Ordinary Differential Equations (MAP 2302) (3 cr) and addition of Calculus III (MAC 2313) (4 cr) to the Contextual courses, because the faculty has determined that Calculus III is a superior choice for preparation of students for physical chemistry.
2) removal of Algebra-based Physics from the list of possible physics courses that can be taken as prerequisites to the major, and retaining only Calculus-Based Physics I and II. This is requested because the State University System Common Prerequisites Committee has changed the common prerequisites for the B.S. Chemistry major. It has dropped Algebra-based Physics I and II from the list of possible physics courses and has restricted the physics requirement to Calculus-Based Physics I and II only.
Removed
PHY 2053 Algebra-Based Physics I (3 crs)
PHY 2053L Algebra-Based Physics I Lab (1 cr)
PHY 2054 Algebra-Based Physics II (3 crs)
PHY 2054L Algebra-Based Physics II Lab (1 cr)
Retained
PHY 2048 Calculus-Based Physics I (4 crs)
PHY 2048L Calculus-Based Physics I Lab (1 cr)
PHY 2049 Calculus-Based Physics II (4 crs)
PHY 2049L Calculus-Based Physics II Lab (1 cr)
3) addition of Organic Chemistry I and II to the prerequisites to the major, because the SUS Common Prerequisites Committee has added these courses to the common prerequisites. This action will eliminate the Core area of our program of study, because the Core previously consisted of either physics or organic chemistry, whichever had not been counted as a prerequisite.
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I (3 crs)
CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry I Lab (1 cr)
CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II (3 crs)
CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry II Lab (1 cr)
4) increase of Major Electives credit from 12 to 15 credits, because the faculty has determined that the current elective requirement does not give students adequate opportunity to gain satisfactory breadth at the advanced level in modern topics in chemistry, including the ACS-accreditation requirement of in-depth coursework.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-071
APC 3
 
BS: Chemistry Major Pre-Medical Professions Track

Summary of the Changes:
The Department of Chemistry is adding to its current BS program a specialized track of study of subjects pertaining to the pre-medical professions. The track requires 120 credits. The track is suited for students interested in pursuing a variety of medical professional programs, such as medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, podiatry, or optometry. It is designed to provide a broad background in chemistry with an interdisciplinary emphasis by including courses in biology. The track provides all of the prerequisites for entry into most graduate programs in chemistry. No new courses or resources are required for this track, since it simply guides students to the most appropriate coursework that is currently offered. The list of courses included in this program of study appears below.
Biochemistry Laboratory (BCH 4033L) (1 cr) is moved from Major Electives to Major Requirements.
Two lower-division biology courses are added to required Contextuals.
BSC 1011C General Biology II (4 crs)
BSC 2012C General Biology III (4 crs)
Three upper-division biology courses are added to the list of Major Electives, in order to indicate appropriate coursework while simultaneously retaining the student's flexibility in choosing which electives best fit the particular health profession they wish to pursue.
PCB 3063C Genetics (4 crs)
PCB 3023C Molecular and Cellular Biology (4 crs)
MCB 3020C Microbial Biology (4 crs)
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-072
APC 3
 
BS: Chemistry Major Materials Chemistry Track

Summary of the Changes:
The Department of Chemistry is adding a specialized track of study in materials chemistry to its current BS program. The track requires 120 credits. The track is designed to provide a broad background in chemistry with an interdisciplinary emphasis by requiring courses in mathematics, computer science, and physics. This track is especially suited for students interested in pursuing graduate education or research/industrial careers focused on the application of chemical and physical principles to the discovery, design, and characterization of materials (e.g. inorganic solids, polymers, and nanoscale materials). The track provides all of the prerequisites for entry into most graduate programs in chemistry. No new courses or resources are required for this track, since it simply guides students to the most appropriate coursework that is currently offered. The list of courses added to this program of study appears below.
COAS Department of Mathematics and Statistics - Calculus III (MAC 2313) (4 crs) is being added as a required Contextual course to its program of study.
COAS Department of Physics - several physics courses are being moved from Major Electives to Major Requirements:
Modern Physics (PHY 3101) (3 crs)
Modern Physics Laboratory (PHY 3101L) (1 crs)
Mathematical Physics (PHZ 3113) (3 crs)
Optics (PHY 3424) (3 crs)
Electronics for Scientists (PHY 3722C) (4 crs)
Quantum Mechanics (PHY 4604) (4 crs)
Solid State Physics (PHY 3404) added to Major Electives (3 crs)
CCEC School of Computing - Computer Science (COP 2220) (3 crs) is being added as a required Contextual course.
CCEC School of Engineering - Material Science I (EML 3520C) (4 crs) is being added as a Major Elective.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
 
Undergraduate- English
 
09/10-073
APC 1
LIT 2XXX
The Art of Close Reading (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the practice of close reading. Students will learn the basic elements of literary texts (for example, structural features, rhetorical devices, literary tropes, textual repetitions and patterns) and of producing literary analyses. This course is required before taking 4000-level courses and must be taken either before or concurrently with the first 3000-level course. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-074
APC 1
TPP 3100
Acting II (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
TPP 2100: Acting Workshop or Permission of Instructor
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This is an advanced course in acting that builds on skills learned in Acting I. Students gain a working knowledge of the analysis, rehearsal, and performance techniques associated with particular acting methods or styles. Different semesters focus on different styles depending on the semester's production schedule. Acting methods and styles include techniques associated with works in Realism and the American "Method" as practiced by Adler, Meisner, and Hagen; techniques associated with analysis and performance of the classical verse drama of Shakespeare and Moliere; techniques associated with Commedia, Expressionism, and Brechtian theater; techniques associated with more physically based systems such as Alexander and Suzuki. Students will read dramatic texts and theory. A commitment to substantial scene rehearsal is required. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-075
APC 2
CRW 4424
Playwright's Project
Request 1: Change CRW 4424: Playwrights' project to CRW 3XXX: Playwrights' Project. Also we request changing the credit hours to repeatable up to 12 credit hours and adding a pre-requisite course: CRW 2XXX - Introduction to Playwriting. We have also changed the course description and course objectives to fit into the new creative writing minor and to fit into the revised English major, Drama track and drama minor.
New Course Description:
This course is a workshop in playwriting, acting, and directing. The first part of the course is an intensive writing workshop that gives students practice in developing original dramatic texts and having them critiqued by their peers. During the final part of the course, students will select several stage-worthy scripts from among the original writing completed in the first part of the course and produce them-select a cast, rehearse lines, build sets, block scenes, and direct and act in a final performance. May be repeated for up to 12 credit hours.
 
09/10-076
APC 2
TPP 2100
Acting Workshop
Change title, course description, and course objectives for TPP 2100: Acting Workshop to TPP 2100: Acting I. The change will fit the course into the revised English major-drama track and drama minor.
New Course Description:
This is a beginning course in the fundamentals of acting. Students learn a working vocabulary and acquire basic skills of the acting process. Through formal and improvisational techniques for developing vocal, physical, and analytical skills associated with behavior-based acting, students explore the imagination as the actor's primary resource for building a character. Emphasis is on relaxation, trust, and mental agility. Some monologue and/or scene work may be required.
 
09/10-077
APC 3
 
BA: English Major Drama Track

Summary of the Changes:
The English major, Drama-track will provide students with a sequence of drama courses in which they will: (i) analyze the basic elements of representative works in dramatic literature, (ii) participate and develop skills relating to the performance of dramatic productions, (iii) practice the techniques and methods of dramatic performance, and (iv) gain experience with live audience theater.
Request 1: The department requests adding LIT 2XXX as a "gateway" course for the department's majors (English and English-Drama) as well as its minors (Drama and Film Studies). The course will be required for all 4000-level major courses and can either be taken before or concurrently with the first 3000-level courses.
Rationale: This course is specifically designed for students who plan on taking upper-division literature and film courses. It provides students with an introduction to basic principles of literary criticism and gives students practice in the basic procedures and challenges of close reading.
Request 2: The department would like to re-organize the current program of study in the catalog to clarify the categories of requirements. The current and proposed programs of study are attached.
Request 3: The department requests that TPP 3100: Acting II (3 credit hours) be made one of the selections for the Acting Requirements under the Major Requirements.
TOTAL REQUIRED CREDIT HOURS WOULD RANGE FROM 36 to 39 credit hours.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-078
APC 3
 
English-Drama Minor

Summary of the Changes:
The Drama minor will provide students with a sequence of drama courses in which they will: (i) analyze the basic elements of representative works in dramatic literature, (ii) participate and develop skills relating to the performance of dramatic productions, (iii) practice the techniques and methods of dramatic performance, and (iv) gain experience with live audience theater.
Request 1: The department would like to re-organize the current program of study in the catalog to clarify the categories of requirements. The current and proposed programs of study are attached.
Request 2: The department requests that TPP 3100: Acting II (3 credit hours) be made one of the selections for the Acting Requirements under the Major Requirements.
THE TOTAL CREDIT HOURS WOULD REMAIN 15 CREDIT HOURS.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-079
APC 1
FIL 4XXX
World Cinema and the Cross-Cultural Encounter (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
FIL 2000: Introduction to Film Studies
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
Based on a set of films that focus on the situation of the cross-cultural encounter -including tourism, immigration, and transnational romance-paired with critical readings in world cinema studies, this course will provide students with the analytical tools to address three central questions: What does it mean to be "abroad"? What are the pleasures, privileges, and perils of being "lost in translation"? And how does the cinema both reflect and participate in globalization? Our exploration of these questions will also entail that students be self-critical about how their encounter with world cinema is a cross-cultural experience. The principle analytical tools will be drawn from the diverse interdisciplinary fields of cinema and media studies, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, and cultural anthropology. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-080
APC 3
 
Film Studies Minor

Summary of the Changes:
Request 1: The department requests that LIT 3213: The Art of Critical Reading be changed from a pre-requisite to a requirement.
Rationale: This course builds on LIT 2xxx: The Art of Close Reading to provide students with the necessary theoretical terms and concepts for interpreting film and literature.
Request 2: The department requests that FIL 4xxx: World Cinema and the Cross-Cultural Encounter be added to the selection of courses for the Film Studies minor.
Rationale: This course enlarges the Film Studies curriculum and gives students an additional option for meeting the cultural diversity requirement.
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS WOULD INCREASE FROM 15 TO 18 CREDIT HOURS.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-081
APC 1
CRW 2XXX
Introduction to Playwriting (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing and
LIT 2000: Introduction to Literature or
LIT 2xxx: The Art of Close Reading
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the art and craft of playwriting. Students will read plays and analyze their basic elements including dramatic action, characterization, dialogue, and the shape and pacing of scenes. In order to understand the nature of drama from the perspectives of actor, director, and audience as well as playwright, students will write scenes and perform them, a process that will involve staging and directing those scenes. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-082
APC 1
CRW 4XXX
Advanced Creative Writing Workshop 
(3 crs)
Prerequisites:
At least 6 hours of 3000-level CRW courses and instructor's permission.
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
Students will continue to develop their skills in reading, writing, and critiquing, while also becoming familiar with the submission and publication process. Projects that students will engage in may include the following: development of submission portfolios; research on journals, magazines, and online publication outlets; completion of submissions by sending out work for publication; and public readings of student work. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-083
APC 1
CRW 2XXX
Introduction to Creative Writing (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing and
LIT 2000: Introduction to Literature or
LIT 2xxx: The Art of Close Reading
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
In this course, students will read works from a variety of literary genres, produce samples of work in each genre, develop productive critiques of one another's work within a workshop setting, and revise at least one of their samples. This course is for students who want to develop basic skills in more than one genre of creative writing. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-084
APC 1
CRW 2XXX
Introduction to Poetry Writing (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing and
LIT 2000: Introduction to Literature or
LIT 2xxx: The Art of Close Reading
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This workshop allows students to explore together the fundamentals of the craft of poetry. Students will learn the difference between poetry and prose, as well as the ability to identify the attributes that make poetry a unique and expressive art form. Students will learn basic terminology and close reading skills in order to write analyses that demonstrate precision and sensitivity to the nuances of poetic language. Students will read and memorize poems by master poets, whose work will be the focus of our analysis. Learning to explicate great poetry will provide students with skills they can apply to their own poetry, which will be the ultimate focus of this course. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-085
APC 1
CRW 3XXX
Poetry Workshop (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
CRW 2xxx-Introduction to Poetry Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
During the course of the semester, students will respond to different kinds of assignment prompts to develop their mastery of verbal craftsmanship. They will also read work by both active contemporary poets and well-known, canonical poets. Students will critique and discuss one another's work in a workshop setting in order to gain facility using language with precision. May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-086
APC 1
CRW 2XXX
Introduction to Screenwriting (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing and
LIT 2000: Introduction to Literature or
LIT 2xxx: The Art of Close Reading
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course examines the basic formal elements of screenplays-including characterization, dialogue, scene structure, plot construction, genre conventions, and formatting requirements. Students will critically analyze screenplays by the great auteurs of the twentieth century. The students' major project will be to write short motion picture or television screenplays of their own. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-087
APC 1
CRW 3XXX
Screenwriting Workshop (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
CRW 2xxx-Introduction to Screenwriting
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course explores the nature of screenplay writing in a workshop format. Students will analyze the basic and more advanced elements of screenplays and write an original, feature-length television or motion picture screenplay. May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-088
APC 1
CRW 2XXX
Introduction to Fiction Writing (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing and
LIT 2000: Introduction to Literature or
LIT 2xxx: The Art of Close Reading
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
In this course, students will study the basic techniques used by both canonical and contemporary fiction writers to build convincing and compelling worlds, characters, and plots. Students will then work to apply those techniques to their own fiction. They will develop the skills and techniques necessary for both a productive critique of their own and one another's fiction, and for the in-depth work of successful revision. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-089
APC 1
CRW 3XXX
Fiction Workshop (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
CRW 2xxx-Introduction to Fiction Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This workshop offers students multiple opportunities to employ the methods and techniques learned in the 2000-level CRW courses. Students will share and critique rough drafts of their work. These critiques will help students develop a final portfolio. Students will produce at least two substantial submissions. Readings will be drawn from contemporary fiction. May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-090
APC 1
CRW 2XXX
Introduction to Creative Non-Fiction 
(3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing and
LIT 2000: Introduction to Literature or
LIT 2XXX: The Art of Close Reading
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
In this course we will examine the narrative possibilities of creative nonfiction. We will explore structure, technique and authorial presence in representative works of established sub-genres, including literary journalism, travel writing, memoir, and the personal essay, as well as more experimental forms like the lyric essay and collage. Students will develop skills and techniques necessary for the productive critique of their own and one another's writing and for the in-depth work of successful revision. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-091
APC 1
CRW 3XXX
Creative Non-Fiction Workshop (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
CRW 2xxx-Introduction to Creative Non-Fiction
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This workshop offers students the opportunity to employ and build on methods and techniques introduced in the 2000-level CRW courses. Students will closely examine a variety of exemplary, largely contemporary works. This will enable them to match the form and techniques of a variety of genres to subjects of their own choosing. Detailed critique, discussion and revision will result in the completion of a portfolio of drafts, revisions and one finished work of high quality. May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-092
APC 3
 
Creative Writing Minor

Summary of the Changes:
The department requests creating a new minor in creative writing that will provide students with a sequence of creative writing courses in which they will: (i) analyze the basic elements of the different literary genres (fiction, drama, poetry, creative non-fiction, and screenwriting), (ii) examine how both canonical and non-canonical authors have mastered these elements, (iii) gain practice at imitating the techniques and styles of these authors, (iv) develop and revise their work for peer review, (v) critique one another's work in workshop-style courses, and (vi) prepare work for submission to recognized journals and contests.
Rationale: The department has not previously offered a sequence of creative writing courses that is organized around increasingly sophisticated goals and outcomes and increasing. The department now has the required personnel to offer a programmatically linked sequence of writing courses. In addition, the department has instituted a menu of creative writing course options as part of the General Education program, and these courses have enrolled heavily. The department seeks to offer a Minor in Creative Writing in order to provide a curricular option for which there is strong student interest.
TOTAL HOURS: 15 CREDITS
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-093
APC 3
 
BA: English Major

Summary of the Changes:
Request 1: The department requests adding LIT 2XXX as a "gateway" course for the department's majors (English and English-Drama) as well as its minor. The course will be required for all 4000-level major courses and can either be taken before or concurrently with the first 3000-level courses.
Rationale: This course is specifically designed for students who plan on taking upper-division literature and film courses. It provides students with an introduction to basic principles of literary criticism and gives students practice in the basic procedures and challenges of close reading.
Request 2: The department requests that the new CRW 3xxx series (CRW 3xxx-Creative Non-Fiction Workshop, CRW 3xxx-Fiction Workshop, CRW 4424-Playwrights' Project, CRW 3xxx-Poetry Workshop, and CRW 3xxx-Screenwriting Workshop) be listed under the "Literary Medium" requirement for the English major, in addition to CRW 3930 ST: Creative Writing.
Rationale: These new courses are consistent, in kind, with the department's other "Literary Medium" course offerings.
THE TOTAL CREDIT HOURS WOULD RANGE FROM 36 TO 39 CREDIT HOURS.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-094
APC 3
 
English Minor

Summary of the Changes:
Request 1: The department requests adding LIT 2XXX as a "gateway" course for the department's majors (English and English-Drama) as well as its minor. The course will be required for all 4000-level major courses and can either be taken before or concurrently with the first 3000-level courses.
Rational: This course is specifically designed for students who plan on taking upper-division literature and film courses. It provides students with an introduction to basic principles of literary criticism and gives students practice in the basic procedures and challenges of close reading.
THE TOTAL CREDITS WOULD REMAIN 15 CREDIT HOURS.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-096
APC 2
LIT 2932
ST: Literature
LIT 2932 will be obsolete in the General Education writing sequence. It will be replaced by ENC 2XXX Writing Topics: Literature. This change makes the menu of options consistent when students choose their third general education writing course.
 
09/10-097
APC 1
ENC 2XXX
Writing Topics: Social Sciences (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within the social sciences. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the social sciences, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to the social sciences and related professional communities. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-098
APC 1
ENC 2XXX
Writing Topics: Fine Arts (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within fine arts. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the fine arts, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to fine arts and related professional communities. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-099
APC 1
ENC 2XXX
Writing Topics: Engineering (3 crs) 
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within engineering. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the engineering, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to engineering and related professional communities. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-100
APC 1
ENC 2XXX
Writing Topics: Health (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within health. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in health, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to health and related professional communities. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-101
APC 1
ENC 2XXX
Writing Topics: Business (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within business. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in business, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to business and related professional communities. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-102
APC 1
ENC 2XXX
Writing Topics: Education (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within education. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in education, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to education and related professional communities. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-103
APC 1
ENC 2XXX
Writing Topics: Natural Sciences (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within the natural sciences. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the natural sciences, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to the natural sciences and related professional communities. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-104
APC 1
ENC 2XXX
Writing Topics: Literature (3 crs) 
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within the study of literature. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in literature, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to literature and related disciplines. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-105
APC 1
ENC 2XXX
Writing Topics: Humanities (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
ENC 1101: College Writing
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to rhetorical strategies needed for successful research-based writing in diverse academic and non-academic situations within the humanities. This course will also require students to focus on the writing conventions and expectations in the humanities, as well as practice in writing in a variety of genres, including the argumentative essay. Students will practice addressing a variety of audiences and using research strategies relevant to the humanities and related disciplines. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-106
APC 1
ENC 1130
Special Topics in Writing (v.1-4 crs) 
Prerequisites:
None
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
ENC1130 focuses on the development of effective composing, revising, and editing strategies. The goals of ENC1130 are (1) to develop writing skills needed to succeed in other academic courses by focusing more intensely on style and grammar, and (2) to introduce students to reflective judgment and rhetorical inquiry as the foundation for all communication. This course satisfies Gordon Rule English Credit. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-107
APC 3
 
General Education Communications Requirements

Summary of the Changes:
Request 1: The Department of English would like to revise this three-course curriculum. To this end we have proposed to the General Education Council, whose members have endorsed our proposal (see appended memo), the following curriculum, which keeps ENC 1101 and offers two options for students' second general education writing course: LIT 2000 - Introduction to Literature or LIT 2xxx - The Art of Close Reading.
The revised curriculum also substitutes for LIT 2932 a menu of options that will give students a number of choices for their third general education writing course:
a. CRW 2xxx (Introduction to Creative Writing); CRW 2xxx (Introduction to Creative Non-Fiction); CRW 2xxx (Introduction to Fiction Writing); CRW 2xxx (Introduction to Playwriting); CRW 2xxx (Introduction to Poetry Writing); CRW 2xxx (Introduction to Screenwriting); CRW 2930 (Special Topics in Creative Writing) - 3 credit hours [Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and LIT 2000]
b. ENC 2930: (Special Topics in Composition); ENC 2xxx (Writing Topics: Business); ENC 2xxx (Writing Topics: Education); ENC 2xxx: (Writing Topics: Engineering); ENC 2xxx (Writing Topics: Fine Arts); ENC 2xxx (Writing Topics: Health); ENC 2xxx (Writing Topics: Humanities); ENC 2xxx (Writing Topics: Literature); ENC 2xxx (Writing Topics: Natural Sciences); ENC 2xxx (Writing Topics: Social Sciences) - 3 credit hours [Prerequisite: ENC1101]
c. ENC 2210 (Technical Writing) - 3 credit hours [Prerequisite: ENC1101]
Effect of Proposed Changes - Increased number of options for students: After taking ENC 1101, students will have the option of (i) taking LIT 2000 or LIT 2xxx either before taking one of the courses from the menu or (ii) taking one of the courses from the menu before taking LIT 2000 or LIT 2xxx, (iii) unless they want to take CRW courses, in which case they must first take LIT 2000.
National research on composition programs indicates that students are more successful when they have a greater range of writing program options.
Request 2: The department would like to add ENC 1130 - Special Topics in Writing as an elective in the General Education curriculum. It would not count as part of the three course (9 credit hour) writing requirement.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
 
Graduate- English
 
09/10-095
APC 3
 
MA: English Major

Summary of the Changes:
Request 1: The department requests that LIN 3010 Principles of Linguistics (3 crs) be removed as a
pre-requisite and requirement for the English-M.A. program.
Rationale: The linguistics prerequisite has no direct bearing on the programmatic goals and outcomes of the M.A. Program in English.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 

25 September 2009

 

To: Faculty Association APC Committee

 

From: A. Samuel Kimball, Professor of English and Chair, Department of English

Marnie Jones, Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences

 

Re: Department of English APC Changes

 

This memo is to affirm that the Department of English will need no new resources in order to put into effect any of the curricular changes that we have specified on the APC 1 forms concerning the courses listed below. It is also the case that we need no new resources in order to effect the changes specified on the APC 3 forms:

 

APC 1 Changes with Respect to the Following Courses

CRW 2xxx-Introduction to Creative Non-Fiction
CRW 2xxx: Introduction to Fiction Writing
CRW 2xxx: Introduction to Poetry Writing
CRW 2xxx: Introduction to Playwriting
CRW 2xxx: Introduction to Screenwriting
CRW 2xxx: Introduction to Creative Writing
CRW 3xxx: Creative Non-Fiction Workshop
CRW 3xxx: Fiction Workshop
CRW 3xxx: Poetry Workshop
CRW 3xxx: Screenwriting Workshop
CRW 4xxx: Advanced Creative Writing

ENC 1130: Spec. Topics in Writing
ENC 2xxx: Writing Topics - Business
ENC 2xxx: Writing Topics - Education
ENC 2xxx: Writing Topics - Engineering
ENC 2xxx: Writing Topics - Fine Arts
ENC 2xxx: Writing Topics - Health
ENC 2xxx: Writing Topics - Humanities
ENC 2xxx: Writing Topics - Literature
ENC 2xxx: Writing Topics - Natural Sciences
ENC 2xxx: Writing Topics - Social Sciences

LIT 2xxx: The Art of Close Reading

TPP 3xxx (Acting II)
FIL 4xxx: World Cinema/Cross Cultural Encounter

 

APC 3 Changes with Respect to the Following Courses and Programs

APC 3 - Add Program: Creative Writing Minor
APC 3 - Program Change to the General Education Communication Requirements
APC 3 - Program Change to the English Major
APC 3 - Program Change to the English Minor
APC 3 - Program Change to the English - Drama Track
APC 3 - Program Change to the English - Drama Minor
APC 3 - Program Change to the Film Studies Minor
APC 3 - Program Change to the English MA

 

 

 

October 5, 2009

 

APC Committee
English Department and University APC Committee
University of North Florida

 

Re: Changes to English major and courses for English Education majors

 

APC Committee Members:

 

I am the Program Area Leader for English Education (Foundations and Secondary Education) and have been in consultation with Dr. Sam Kimball, Chair of the English Department, regarding changes to courses that affect our respective programs. I am in agreement with Dr. Kimball about the need for a "gateway" course prior to students taking upper-level English courses. I believe that the proposed course (LIT 2XXX - The Art of Close Reading) would better prepare both English majors as well as English Education majors to be more critical readers as well as stronger writers. The proposed course would also fulfill one of the writing course requirements for General Education and would in no ways unduly burden our Education students.

I am therefore in favor of the proposed change. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me at any time.

 

Best,

John W. White
English Education Program Leader
Department of Foundations and Secondary Education
College of Education and Human Services

 

 
 
Undergraduate- International Studies
 
09/10-039
APC 3
 
BA: International Studies Major
Middle Eastern and African Studies Track

Summary of the Changes:
The interdisciplinary International Studies program of study is being changed as follows:
The foreign language requirement has not changed, but is being reworded to encourage students already proficient in a language to continue their language study if possible. The new wording is: Students already proficient in two languages should take additional upper-division language courses in place of the intermediate-level language courses. Students may petition the Program Director for permission to substitute two major electives (if upper-division courses are not available in the appropriate language) or beginning-level language courses (if students wish to begin studying a new language) in place of the intermediate-level language course requisites.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-040
APC 3
 
BA: International Studies Major
European Studies Track

Summary of the Changes:
The interdisciplinary International Studies program of study is being changed as follows:
The foreign language requirement has not changed, but is being reworded to encourage students already proficient in a language to continue their language study if possible. The new wording is: Students already proficient in two languages should take additional upper-division language courses in place of the intermediate-level language courses. Students may petition the Program Director for permission to substitute two major electives (if upper-division courses are not available in the appropriate language) or beginning-level language courses (if students wish to begin studying a new language) in place of the intermediate-level language course requisites.
The list of major electives (divided into regional and thematic concentrations) is being updated to account for recent course additions in the contributing disciplines. Each contributing discipline's chair has approved these additions to the European Studies track:
ARH3434 Modern European Art II (3 credits)
ARH3930 British Art (3 credits)
ENL3134 British Novel II (3 credits)
ENL3503 Periods of Later British Literature (3 credits)
EUH 3462 Modern Germany (3 credits)
LIT 4935 Contemporary British Fiction (3 credits)
The total number of credit hours earned within the major is not changing. This form simply updates the list of major electives available to students.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-041
APC 3
 
BA: International Studies Major Asian Studies Track

Summary of the Changes:
The interdisciplinary International Studies program of study is being changed as follows:
The foreign language requirement has not changed, but is being reworded to encourage students already proficient in a language to continue their language study if possible. The new wording is: Students already proficient in two languages should take additional upper-division language courses in place of the intermediate-level language courses. Students may petition the Program Director for permission to substitute two major electives (if upper-division courses are not available in the appropriate language) or beginning-level language courses (if students wish to begin studying a new language) in place of the intermediate-level language course requisites.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-042
APC 3
 
BA: International Studies Major Latin American Studies Track

Summary of the Changes:
The interdisciplinary International Studies program of study is being changed as follows:
The foreign language requirement has not changed, but is being reworded to encourage students already proficient in a language to continue their language study if possible. The new wording is: Students already proficient in two languages should take additional upper-division language courses in place of the intermediate-level language courses. Students may petition the Program Director for permission to substitute two major electives (if upper-division courses are not available in the appropriate language) or beginning-level language courses (if students wish to begin studying a new language) in place of the intermediate-level language course requisites.
The list of major electives (divided into regional and thematic concentrations) is being updated to account for recent course additions in the contributing disciplines. Each contributing discipline's chair has approved these additions to the Latin American Studies track:
LAH3135 Spain in the New World (3 credits)
LAH3736 Mod Lat Am in Film (3 credits)
LIT4650 Caribbean/American Literature (3 credits)
The total number of credit hours earned within the major is not changing. This form simply updates the list of major electives available to students.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-043
APC 3
 
BA: International Studies Major
International Relations and Politics Track

Summary of the Changes:
The interdisciplinary International Studies program of study is being changed as follows:
The foreign language requirement has not changed, but is being reworded to encourage students already proficient in a language to continue their language study if possible. The new wording is: Students already proficient in two languages should take additional upper-division language courses in place of the intermediate-level language courses. Students may petition the Program Director for permission to substitute two major electives (if upper-division courses are not available in the appropriate language) or beginning-level language courses (if students wish to begin studying a new language) in place of the intermediate-level language course requisites.
The list of major electives (divided into regional and thematic concentrations) is being updated to account for recent course additions in the contributing disciplines. The contributing discipline's chair has approved this addition to the International Relations and Politics track:
ARH3470 Art after 1940 (3 credits)
FIL4828 International Film (3 credits)
The total number of credit hours earned within the major is not changing. This form simply updates the list of major electives available to students.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-044
APC 3
 
BA: International Studies Major Foreign Language and Culture Track

Summary of the Changes:
The interdisciplinary International Studies program of study is being changed as follows:
The foreign language requirement has not changed, but is being reworded to encourage students already proficient in a language to continue their language study if possible. The new wording is: Students already proficient in two languages should take additional upper-division language courses in place of the intermediate-level language courses. Students may petition the Program Director for permission to substitute two major electives (if upper-division courses are not available in the appropriate language) or beginning-level language courses (if students wish to begin studying a new language) in place of the intermediate-level language course requisites.
The list of major electives (divided into regional and thematic concentrations) is being updated to account for recent course additions in the contributing disciplines. Each
contributing discipline's chair has approved these additions to the Foreign Language and Culture track:
FRE3350 Reading French Lit and Culture (3 credits)
FRE4930 Paris in the 1950s (3 credits)
LAH3736 Mod Lat Am in Film (3 credits)
SPN4930 Intern for Service in Spanish (3 credits)
SPW4223 Hispanic Genres (3 credits)
The total number of credit hours earned within the major is not changing. This form simply updates the list of major electives available to students.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
 
Undergraduate- Mathematics & Statistics
 
09/10-122
APC 1
STA 4XXX
Probability Models with
Applications to Actuarial Science
(3 crs)
Prerequisites:
MAC 2313 (Calculus III)
MAS 3105 (Linear Algebra)
and either STA4321 (Probability and Statistics)
or STA3032 (Prob/Statistics for Engrs)
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
Topics will emphasize applications to actuarial science and include: frequency and severity distributions, exponential distributions and Poisson processes, aggregate loss models, Markov chain models, Brownian motion. This course is recommended for students preparing to take the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Exam M (Actuarial Models). No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-123
APC 3
 
BS: Statistics Major

Summary of the Changes:
The department requests that the new course (APC1 submitted) Probability Models with Applications to Actuarial Science (STA4xxx, credits=3 hours) be added to the list of Major electives for the B.S. in Statistics.
The department is developing a concentration in Actuarial Science. This course will be one of the courses included.
A student's total credit hours will not be affected by the selection of this course as an elective.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-124
APC 3
 
BA: Statistics Major

Summary of the Changes:
The department requests that the new course (APC1 submitted) Probability Models with Applications to Actuarial Science (STA4xxx, credits=3 hours) be added to the list of Major electives for the B.A. in Statistics.
The department is developing a concentration in Actuarial Science. This course will be one of the courses included.
A student's total credit hours will not be affected by the selection of this course as an elective.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-125
APC 3
 
BS: Mathematics Major

Summary of the Changes:
The department requests that the new course (APC1 submitted) Probability Models with Applications to Actuarial Science (STA4xxx, credits=3 hours) be added to the list of Major electives for the B.S. in Mathematics.
The department is developing a concentration in Actuarial Science. This course will be one of the courses included.
A student's total credit hours will not be affected by the selection of this course as an elective.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-126
APC 3
 
BA: Mathematics Major

Summary of the Changes:
The department requests that the new course (APC1 submitted) Probability Models with Applications to Actuarial Science (STA4xxx, credits=3 hours) be added to the list of Major electives for the B.A. in Mathematics.
The department is developing a concentration in Actuarial Science. This course will be one of the courses included.
A student's total credit hours will not be affected by the selection of this course as an elective.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
 
Undergraduate- Music
 
09/10-143
APC 1
MVK 2XXXL
Piano Elective for Non-Majors (1 cr)
Prerequisites:
Instructor Permission
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course provides non-required individual piano study for undergraduate students from all majors. This course is available to students of all levels of musical ability, with instructor permission. Topics covered may include piano technique, etudes, repertoire, sight-reading, and piano accompaniment. Piano literature covered will include a broad range of styles and genres. This course may be repeated up to a total of ten credits. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-144
APC 2
MUN 3413
String Ensemble
We are requesting that the name of the course "String Ensemble" be changed to "Orchestra" in order to more accurately reflect the instrumentation of this ensemble course in the Department of Music. Since this course involves students performing on instruments besides string instruments, the new course title will encourage additional music students to participate in this ensemble. This course is open to music majors as well as non-majors and participation is based on audition.
 
 
Undergraduate- Philosophy
 
09/10-136
APC 1
PHI 4XXX
Lies and Self-Deception (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
At least one of the following (with a B or better grade):
PHH 3100- Ancient; PHH 3400-Modern; PHI 3130- Logic; PHI 3691- Ethics
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
Self-deception is a common phenomenon. In fact, nearly everyone seems to have a friend or family member who they think is self-deceived- e.g., about the faithfulness of his or her lover, about his or her beliefs for (or against) a particular religion or political party, and so forth. This apparent ability to lie to oneself ion the face of the evidence seems to be a rather contemptuous vice. However, recent psychological studies seem to suggest that at least some forms of self-deception are life-enhancing. Thus, it might seem that self-deception can be a virtue. In this course, we examine the nature of self-deception, evaluate its ambiguous ethical status, and reflect on how these insights should affect the way that we live. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-139
APC 1
PHI 3XXX
Global Justice (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
None
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course examines the phenomenon of globalization from a moral and ethical perspective. Questions include the following: What are universal human rights and how are they compatible with the diversity of cultural practices and traditions worldwide? What duties do we have to the global environment? What obligations, if any, do members of affluent countries have to address world hunger and poverty? What are the forms of governance appropriate to a globalized world? Is humanitarian military intervention in the internal affair of another country justifiable? Should we understand ourselves first and foremost as citizens of the world or as members of bounded communities? No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-140
APC 2
PHI 4220
Philosophy of Language
We request to replace the course description of PHI 4220 Philosophy of Language with an updates one representing the current content of the course. The new course description together with the new learning outcomes and textbooks are given below. The new course description will also be used for the graduate co-listing of the course. The new description adequately reflects how the course is taught and what is covered by it, and it aligns the course with the graduate level section that is added to it.
New Course Description:
The course explores the lasting significance of the linguistic turn in philosophy, including its different philosophical perspectives in analytic philosophy, speech act theory, semiotics and poststructuralism, and philosophical hermeneutics. Central questions include: What is the role of language for human consciousness and experience? How is linguistic meaning constituted, and what are its essential components? What is the basic structure of language, and how does it affect our access to reality? What is the relation between language and truth? What is the role of language and linguistic meaning for the constitution of culture, society, and politics? The course clarifies concepts like consciousness, meaning, reflexivity, truth, reference, normativity, and social practices through the philosophy of language.
 
09/10-141
APC 3
 
BA: Philosophy Major

Summary of the Changes:
We request to add the following courses to our BA program in philosophy.
PHI 3XXX Global Justice (3)
The course will be listed under two tracks under Major Electives including (1) Applied Ethics, and (2) Legal, Political, and Social Studies. It will be co-listed with a graduate with the same title in the MA in practical Philosophy & Applied Ethics. The course examines a currently pressing issue in philosophy, ethics, and politics, and adds additional depth and breadth to our BA. It will also be listed under the Minor tracks (1) Applied Ethics, and (2) Law and Philosophy.
PHI 4XXX Lies& Self-Deception (3)
The course will be listed under one track under Major Electives, Applied Ethics. It will be co-listed with a graduate with the same title in the MA in Practical Philosophy and Applied Ethics. The course examines an important issue in philosophy and ethics, and adds additional depth and breadth to our BA. It will also be listed under the Minor track Applied Ethics.
The total semester hours required for the BA in philosophy (30) remains as is.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
 
Graduate- Philosophy
 
09/10-134
APC 1
PHH 5XXX
19th Century Philosophy (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MA in Practical Philosophy and Applied Ethics or
Admission to the Graduate Certificate in Applied Ethics
or permission of the Philosophy Graduate Coordinator
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course examines the important intellectual developments that follow the French Revolution and the work of Immanuel Kant, leading throughout the writings of the Frierich Nietzsche. Nineteenth century or "late modern" philosophy represents a referendum on the values and assumptions not only of Enlightenment thought but modern reason itself. Focusing on the writings of Schiller, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche, we explore how nineteenth century theorists sought to extend the project of modernity while acknowledging that modern reason can have consequences that undermine its objective to subject the natural and human worlds to rational control. In examining these writers' theories we also explore how their reflections may assist us in considering the problems and prospects out own age. Students in this graduate section will have special writing, reading, and presentation assignments; they will also participate in special sessions with the instructor. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-135
APC 1
PHI 6XXX
Lies and Self-Deception (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MA in Practical Philosophy and Applied Ethics or
Admission to the Graduate Certificate in Applied Ethics
or permission of the Philosophy Graduate Coordinator
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
Self-deception is a common phenomenon. In fact, nearly everyone seems to have a friend or family member who they think is self-deceived- e.g., about the faithfulness of his or her lover, about his or her beliefs for (or against) a particular religion or political party, and so forth. This apparent ability to lie to oneself ion the face of the evidence seems to be a rather contemptuous vice. However, recent psychological studies seem to suggest that at least some forms of self-deception are life-enhancing. Thus, it might seem that self-deception can be a virtue. In this course, we examine the nature of self-deception, evaluate its ambiguous ethical status, and reflect on how these insights should affect the way that we live.In addition to satisfying the undergraduate requirements for the course, graduate students will be required to demonstrate graduate-level research proficiency both in writing and in oral presentation of written research. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-137
APC 1
PHI 6XXX
Philosophy of Language (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MA in Practical Philosophy and Applied Ethics or
Admission to the Graduate Certificate in Applied Ethics
or permission of the Philosophy Graduate Coordinator
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
The course explores the lasting significance of the linguistics turn in philosophy, including its different philosophical perspectives in analytic philosophy, speech act theory, semiotics and poststructuralism, and philosophical hermeneutics. Central questions include: What is the role of language for human consciousness and experience? How is linguistics meaning constituted, and what are its essential components? What is the basic structure of language, and how does it affect our access to reality? What is the relation between language and truth? What is the role of language and linguistic meaning for the constitution of culture, society, and politics? The course clarifies concepts like consciousness, meaning, reflexivity, truth, reference, normatively, and social practices through the philosophy of language. The course's approach to language is highly relevant for central issues in the graduate program concerning practical philosophy, including intercultural values and norms, the relation between moral agency ad=nd social contexts, and the normative grounds of a critique of power. Graduate students will be required to demonstrate graduate-level proficiency in research. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-138
APC 1
PHI 5XXX
Global Justice (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MA in Practical Philosophy and Applied Ethics or
Admission to the Graduate Certificate in Applied Ethics
or permission of the Philosophy Graduate Coordinator
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course examines the phenomenon of globalization from a moral and ethical perspective. Questions include the following: What are universal human rights and how are they compatible with the diversity of cultural practices and traditions worldwide? What duties do we have to the global environment? What obligations, if any, do members of affluent countries have to address world hunger and poverty? What are the forms of governance appropriate to a globalized world? Is humanitarian military intervention in the internal affair of another country justifiable? Should we understand ourselves first and foremost as citizens of the world or as members of bounded communities? Students in this graduate section will have special writing, reading, and presentation assignments; they will also participate in special session with the instructor.
No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-142
APC 3
 
MA: Philosophy Major

Summary of the Changes:
We request to add the following courses to our graduate program in philosophy, the MA in Practical Philosophy and Applied Ethics.
PHI 5XXX Global Justice (3)
The course will be listed under the Ethical Issues track in our MA. It will be co-listed with an undergraduate course with the same title in the BA in philosophy. The course examines a currently pressing issue in philosophy, ethics, and politics, and perfectly fits into our graduate program with its ethical and social-political orientation.
PHI 6XXX Lies & Self-Deception (3)
The course will be listed under the Ethical issues track in our MA. It will be co-listed with an undergraduate course with the same title in the BA in philosophy. The course examines an important phenomenon in philosophy and ethics, and perfectly fits into our graduate program to which it adds additional strength.
PHH 5XXX 19th Century Philosophy (3)
The course will be listed under the Practical Philosophy track in our MA. It will be co-listed with an undergraduate course with the same title in the BA in philosophy. The course examines an imporant and influential strand of modern philosophy concerned with ethics and values, and perfectly fits into our graduate program with its ethical and social-political orientation.
PHI 6XXX Philosophy of Language (3)
The course will be listed under the Practical Philosophy track in our MA. It will be co-listed with an undergraduate course with the same title in the BA in philosophy. The course examines a major paradigm shift in philosophy, the turn to language, and explores its significance for a set of issues in ethics and social philosophy. It thus fits into and adds strength to our graduate program with its ethical and social-political orientation.
The total semester hours of the MA (33) remain the same as is.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

1 UNF Drive
Jacksonville, Florida 32224-2664

(904) 620-1330 / Fax (904) 620-1840
 
 

 

Hans-Herbert Koegler October 2, 2009
Professor and Chair
Department of Philosophy
University of North Florida
1 UNF Drive
Jacksonville, FL 32224
Phone 904 620 1330
hkoegler@unf.edu

 

To: Faculty Association APC Committee


From: Hans-Herbert Koegler, Professor and Chair, Department of Philosophy


Re: APC Changes

This memo is to affirm that the Department of Philosophy will need no new resources in order to put into effect any of the curricular changes that we have specified on the APC 1 forms concerning the courses listed below. It is also the case that we need no new resources in order to effect the changes specified on the APC 3 forms:

 

APC 1 Changes with Respect to the Following Courses

Global Justice (BA)
Global Justice (MA)
19th Century Philosophy (MA)
Lies& Self-Deception (BA)
Lies& Self-Deception (MA)
Philosophy of Language (MA)

 

APC 3 Changes with Respect to the Following Courses

Global Justice (BA)
Global Justice (MA)
19th Century Philosophy (MA)
Lies& Self-Deception (BA)
Lies& Self-Deception (MA)
Philosophy of Language (MA)

 

 
 
Undergraduate- Physics
 
09/10-178
APC 1
ESC 2000L
Earth Science Lab (1 cr)
Prerequisites:
None
Corequisites:
ESC 2000 Earth Science
Course Description:
This course is the laboratory course to accompany the Earth Science ESC 2000 lecture course. Topics to be investigated are the scientific method, rocks and minerals, the history of Earth, plate tectonics, earthquakes, mapping, oceanography, atmospheric physics and properties of the Solar System. A laboratory fee will be assessed. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-179
APC 1
ESC 2000
Earth Science (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
None
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to the Earth as a system including the lithosphere, atmosphere, and the hydrosphere. Topics for discussion will include the formation of the Earth and the evolution of its landscape, the atmosphere and principles of weather and climate, the dynamic ocean, comparison with other bodies in the Solar System and human impact on the Earth systems. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-180
APC 2
ESC 2000C
Earth Science

In order to increase flexibility in our course offerings, we wish to effectively split the current combined lecture and laboratory course, ESC 2000C, into two separate lecture and lab courses. To achieve this, we are terminating the current combined lecture and laboratory course, ESC 2000C, and creating a new lecture (ESC 2000) course and a new laboratory (ESC 2000L) course. APC1 forms for these two new courses accompany this request.
ESC 2000C is currently a 3 credit hours combined lecture and laboratory course. ESC 2000 will be a 3 credit hour lecture course in order to increase the amount of coverage in the lecture, and ESC 2000L will be a 1 credit hour laboratory course.

 
09/10-181
APC 3
 
BS: Physics Major Astrophysics Track

Summary of the Changes:
This request is to replace ESC 2000C Earth Science with the new course ESC 2000 Earth Science as a contextual course for the Astrophysics track. In order to increase flexibility in our course offerings, the existing combined lecture and laboratory course ESC 2000C is being split into two separate lecture and lab courses. To achieve this, we are terminating the current combined lecture and laboratory course, ESC 2000C, and creating a new lecture course (ESC 2000) and a new laboratory course (ESC 2000L). ESC 2000C is currently a 3 credit hour course and ESC 2000 will also be a 3 credit hour course in order to increase the amount of coverage in the lecture. The new laboratory course, ESC 2000L, will likely be in high demand to satisfy the science general education requirements of many UNF students but it will not be listed among the courses required for Astrophysics majors. This request does not change the number of credit hours required for the Astrophysics track. APC1 forms for the two new courses accompany this request. No new resources are required.
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-182
APC 3
 
BS: Physics Major  Pre- Medical Physics Track

Summary of the Changes:
The Department of Physics seeks to add to its current selection of concentrations within the BS Physics program a new concentration called Pre-Medical Physics. The track requires 120 SH and provides to students excellent preparation for future graduate study in Medical Physics programs and a strong foundation to excel on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) needed to enter Medical Colleges.
In recent years a number of UNF physics BS graduates have entered graduate programs in Medical Physics at other universities. Students have also expressed an interest in continuing their education in Medical College once they have completed their UNF BS in physics. The scores of physics majors on the national MCAT exam are among the highest among all majors.
This interdisciplinary concentration builds on the strong foundation of core physics coursework by incorporating additional course work in chemistry and biology. Students who complete this concentration successfully will be competitive for entering graduate programs in Medical Physics or Medical Colleges. No new resources or faculty are required to implement this new concentration since the concentration simply directs students into current courses at the university.
The detailed program of study for the new Pre-Medical Physics concentration is attached. Some of the highlights are below.
The students in this concentration are required to take the following biology and chemistry courses:
BSC 1010C General Biology I
BSC 1011C General Biology II
CHM 2045 General Chemistry I and CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Laboratory
CHM 2046 General Chemistry II and CHM 2046L General Chemistry II Laboratory
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I and CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II and CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
In addition, the students may choose 12-13 credit hours from among these biology and chemistry courses:
BSC 2012C General Biology III
PCB 3023C Molecular and Cell Biology
PCB 3063C Genetics
CHM 3120C Quantitative Analytical Chemistry
BCH 4033 Biochemistry and BCH 4033L Biochemistry Laboratory
(Click here to view the Program of study)

 
09/10-189
APC 2
PHY 2930
Selected Topics in Physics

Currently, students can take this course for 2 to 4 semester hours of credit. We would like to change this to 1 to 4 semester hours of credit.

 

 

To: UNF Faculty Association Executive Committee
From: J. Garner

RE: Statement of no new resources and general education compliance  


10/8/2009

 

For the courses listed below, the Department of Physics will require no new resources for these changes and additions. The changes to the Earth Science course is in compliance with the General Education guidelines at UNF.

 

APC 2 Modify PHY 2930 Selected Topics in Physics
(from 2 to 4 credit hours to 1 to 4 credit hours)
APC 2 Terminate ESC 2000C Earth Science
APC 1 Create ESC 2000 Earth Science
APC 1 Create ESC 2000L Earth Science Laboratory
APC 3 Modification of Astrophysics track in view of the above Earth Science changes

 

___________________ James Garner, Chair of Physics Department
______________________ Marnie Jones, COAS Associate Dean

 

 

 

To: UNF Faculty Association Executive Committee
From: J. Garner
RE: Statement of no new resources

 

10/9/2009

 

For the APC 3 listed below, the Department of Physics will require no new resources.

APC 3 Creation of a Pre-Medical Physics concentration in the B.S. Physics program.

 

___________________ James Garner, Chair of Physics Department
______________________ Marnie Jones, COAS Associate Dean

 

 

Undergraduate - Sociology and Anthropology

 
09/10-109
APC 2
SOW 4322
Social Work Practice II

The title of SOW 4322, Social Work Practice II, is being changed to Social Work with Organizations and Communities to provide a more useful description of course content.

 
09/10-110
APC 2
SOW 4302
Social Work Practice I

The title of SOW 4302, Social Work Practice I, is being changed to Social Work with Individuals and Families to provide a more useful description of course content.

 
09/10-113
APC 1
ANT 3XXX
The African Diaspora (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
None
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course offers an overview of anthropological perspectives on the history and contemporary dynamics of the peoples and cultures of the African Diaspora. We will explore the sociocultural, political, and economic experiences of Africans "outside Africa" within the broader context of a changing global order in which diverse socially negotiated forms of identity are lived and expressed in culturally specific ways. Topics include but are not limited to identity, politics, economics, religion, resistance and revolution, music, art, and dance. Students will be exposed to a wide range of interdisciplinary literature and research designed to foster an appreciation for the diversity of the African Diaspora. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-114
APC 1
ANT 4XXX
Anthropology of Race (3 crs)
Prerequisites:
None
Corequisites:
None
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to the uses and misuses of the concept of "race" from an anthropological perspective. Within the broad four-field approach of contemporary anthropology, "race" is recognized as a social construction with no biological validity. In this course, students will explore the concept as a social mechanism created during the eighteenth century and utilized to rationalize colonialism, resulting in enduring social hierarchies of inequality based on phenotypic differences. No new faculty or additional resources are required for this course.
 
09/10-115
APC 3
 
BA: Anthropology Major

Summary of the Changes:
We are adding two new Anthropology courses to the catalog, thus expanding the courses available as electives for Anthropology majors.
ANT 4XXX Anthropology of Race
ANT 3XXX The African Diaspora
These courses cover two related and currently important topics: the anthropological perspective on "race," and the social, cultural, and biological consequences of the often involuntary movement of Africans out of Africa and into other regions.
(Click here to view the Program of study)