Lake Beresford to Lake Monroe

Beresford Plantation marked the end of European plantation development along the St. Johns River. Several other tracts located further upriver were granted to British notables but no record of development has been found. Several large tracts between Lake Beresford and Lake Monroe were selected by Dr. Stork for absentee British grantees. The Earl of Bessborough received 20,000 acres north of the lake in the vicinity of today's De Bary and Deltona. Two of Governor James Grant's kinsmen were upriver from Bessborough and on the east shore of Lake Monroe: Duncan Grant, Esq., for a grant of 10,000 acres, and Sir Archibald Grant, Baronet, for 20,000 acres. Dr. William Stork affixed himself just south of Sir Archibald Grant, on a tract of 1000 acres. Sir Alexander Grant, Esq., another kinsman of the governor, was awarded the last tract bordering Lake Monroe. The 20,000-acre tracts here, as elsewhere along the river, measured approximately three miles along the shore and eight miles to the east.

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South of Lake Beresford and Hontoon Island the St. Johns River bends and twists wildly all the way to Lake Monroe. The Wekiva River joins on the west. To the east, in the general vicinity of Deltona and De Bary today, the Earl of Bessborough was granted 20,000 acres.

 

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Duncan Grant, the Baron Archibald Grant, and Dr. William Stork were all granted land on the north or east shore of Lake Monroe. South of Lake Monroe another kinsman of Governor James Grant was awarded a 20,000-acre tract on the east of the St. Johns River. None of these tracts were developed during the British years.

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The view here is of the St. Johns River south of Lake Monroe. Sir Alexander Grant's 20,000-acre tract was east of the river. Shown here is Lake Jesup on the right, and Lake Harney in the distance.

 

Digital scan of a surveyor's map that locates a number of absentee-owned tracts in the vicinity of Lake Grant (today Lake Monroe). The map has disintegrated in places, and was scanned at low resolution, making it difficult to use in this application, yet it is of value to view a map from the 1760's. Courtesy of the National Archive, Kew, England.