Magnolia Project Clinic Terms 

For a full list visit: The Health of Florida's Children and Youth

Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II): self-report instrument intended to assess the existence and severity of symptoms of depression as listed in the DSM-IV.

Birth Rate: Birth rate is calculated by dividing the number of live births in a population in a year by the midyear resident population. Birth rates are expressed as the number of live births per 1,000 population. The rate may be restricted to births to women of specific age, race, marital status, or geographic location (specific rate), or it may be related to the entire population (crude rate).

Birth Weight: A birth weight is the first weight of the newborn obtained after birth.

Fertility Rate: Fertility rate is the total number of live births, regardless of age of mother, per1,000 women of reproductive age, 15-44 years.

Fetal Death: Fetal death is death before the complete expulsion or extraction from its mother of a product of conception, irrespective of the duration of pregnancy; the death is indicated by the fact that after such separation, the fetus does not breathe or show any other evidence of life, such as beating of the heart, pulsation of the umbilical cord, or definite movement of voluntary muscles. A fetal death rate is the number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more divided by the sum of live births plus fetal deaths, stated per 1,000 live births plus fetal deaths, and a late fetal death rate is the number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 28 weeks or more divided by the sum of live births plus late fetal deaths, stated per 1,000 live births plus late fetal deaths.

Gestation: For the National Vital Statistics System and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Abortion Surveillance, the period of gestation is defined as beginning with the first day of the last normal menstrual period and ending with the day of birth or day of termination of pregnancy.

Infant Death / Mortality: An infant death is the death of a live-born child before his or her first birthday. Deaths in the first year of life may be further classified according to age as neonatal and postneonatal. Neonatal deaths are those that occur before the 28th day of life; postneonatal deaths are those that occur between 28 and 365 days of age. An infant mortality rate is based on period files calculated by dividing the number of infant deaths during a calendar year by the number of live births reported in the same year. It is expressed as the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births.

Live Birth: In the World Health Organization's definition, also adopted by the United Nations and the National Center for Health Statistics, a live birth is the complete expulsion or extraction from its mother of a product of conception, irrespective of the duration of the pregnancy, which, after such separation, breathes or shows any other evidence of life such as heartbeat, umbilical cord pulsation, or definite movement of voluntary muscles, whether the umbilical cord has been cut or the placenta is attached. Each product of such a birth is considered live born.

Low Birth weight: Low birth weight is defined as less than 2,500 grams or 5 pounds 8 ounces

Medicaid: Medicaid was authorized by Title XIX of the Social Security Act in 1965 as a jointly funded cooperative venture between the federal and state governments to assist states in the provision of adequate medical care to eligible needy persons. Medicaid is the largest program providing medical and health-related services to America 's poorest people. Within broad federal guidelines, each of the states establishes its own eligibility standards; determines the type, amount, duration, and scope of services; sets the rate of payment for services; and administers its own program. Thus, the Medicaid program varies considerably from state to state, as well as within each state over time.

Medical Home: A specific source of ongoing care with a continuing medical care provider.

Mortality Rate: A measure of the frequency of occurrence of death in a defined population during a specified interval of time.

Neonatal mortality: Neonatal mortality is defined as those deaths that occur within the first 28 days of life. The top four leading causes of neonatal mortalities are: congenital anomalies, disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, respiratory distress, and maternal complications of pregnancy.

Perinatal Period: The perinatal period is the time from 28 weeks gestation to one week after birth. The following are life-threatening health conditions that take place during the perinatal period: fetus and newborn affected by maternal factors and by complications of pregnancy, labor, and delivery; disorders related to length of gestation and fetal growth; birth trauma; respiratory and cardiovascular disorders specific to the perinatal period; infections specific to the perinatal period; hemorrhagic and hematological disorders of fetus and newborn; transitory endocrine and metabolic disorders specific to fetus and newborn; digestive system disorders of fetus and newborn; conditions involving the integument and temperature regulation of fetus and newborn; other diseases originating in the perinatal period.

Postneonatal mortality: Postneonatal mortality is defined as those deaths that occur after the first 28 days of life, but before the child reaches age one. The top four leading causes of postneonatal deaths are: sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), congenital anomalies, injuries, pneumonia and influenza, and homicide.

Risk Factor: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, an environmental exposure, or an inborn or inherited characteristic that is associated with an increased occurrence of disease or other health-related event or condition.

Very Low Birth weight: Very low birth weight is defined as less than 1,500 grams or 3 pounds 4 ounces.

Vital Statistics: Systematically tabulated information about births, marriages, divorces, and deaths, based on registration of these vital events.

WIC: Food, nutrition counseling, and access to health services are provided to low-income women, infants, and children under the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, popularly known as WIC. WIC provides Federal grants to states for supplemental foods, health care referrals, and nutrition education for low-income pregnant, breastfeeding, and non-breastfeeding postpartum women, and to infants and children who are found to be at nutritional risk.