Flipping the Classroom

Materials & Information from CIRT’s Past Training Events

CIRT offered several training workshops on Flipping the Classroom in late 2013 and early 2014. Listed below are summaries of those events, as well as links to the materials used.

 

3 Easy Ways to Start Flipping Your Class 

(Offered 12/4/13)

The Flipped Classroom model shifts instructional activities to outside the classroom and focuses classroom time on more active strategies such as discussion,  group activities, and peer instruction. In this workshop we discuss the underlying theoretical base, simple strategies for getting started, and existing tools at UNF to support those efforts.

 

Flipping the Classroom Series - Activities to Incentivize Preparation for the Flipped Classroom 

(Offered 03/14/14)

As a follow up to the 3 Easy Ways to Start Flipping Your Class workshop, this series provides an in-depth focus on the key elements of a successful flip. This session focuses on developing tasks for students to complete prior to class related to the new material.  These tasks act to incentivize preparation so that students will be prepared to participate in activities focused on higher levels of cognition during class time. Quizzes, worksheets, and short writing assignments can all be effective to incentivize preparation. These assignments also provide an opportunity to assess learning and provide feedback. Examples of activities and tools for creation are demonstrated and discussed.

 

Flipping the Classroom Series - Developing in class activities focused on high-level cognitive skills 

(Offered 03/28/14)

As a follow up to the 3 Easy Ways to Start Flipping Your Class workshop, this series provides an in-depth focus on the key elements of a successful flip. The real power of the flipped models is the active work that happens in the classroom, focused on higher forms of cognitive work (application, analysis, synthesis, and/or evaluation) in class, with the support of peers and instructor and opportunities for feedback.  These activities vary depending on discipline and learning goals, and may include discussion, debate, data analysis, group work, or peer instruction. The key is that students are deepening their understanding and increasing their skills at using new knowledge. In this session a variety of activities are discussed along with best practices for classroom facilitation.

 

Flipping the Classroom Series - Creating Pre-class Content for the Flipped Classroom 

(Offered 04/11/14)

As a follow up to the 3Easy Ways to Start Flipping Your Class workshop, this series provides an in-depth focus on the key elements of a successful flip. Key to the success of flipped models is that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class. This exposure allows for lower levels of cognitive work (gaining knowledge and comprehension) to occur prior to class and allows for focus on higher forms of cognitive work (application, analysis, synthesis, and/or evaluation) in class, with the support of peers and instructor. First exposure can use a variety of materials, from textbook readings to lecture videos or screencasts. This session focuses on best practices for the selection or creation of pre-class content, with a particular emphasis on use of video tools, including mini-lecture and screencasts.

 

The Flipped Approach to Online Teaching and Learning – Webinar 

(Offered 04/22/14)

Flipping a classroom is a pedagogical approach that enables instructors to create student-centered learning environments by changing when and how certain activities happen. It’s an approach that’s received a lot of attention of late, but most of the conversations have only focused on the face-to-face classroom experience where students participate in activities during class time and watch videos as homework. What if you teach in an online environment without traditional “class time”? Can you still integrate flipped strategies? Yes, you can. In The Flipped Approach to Online Teaching and Learning webinar you will analyze current models for the flipped class and explore how to expand and adapt these models to include online learning environments.