Undergraduate Courses

Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work

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Course Descriptions:

ANT2000: (CD) Introduction to Anthropology
An introduction to the critical issues in anthropology. The major subfields of archaeology, physical anthropology, linguistics, and cultural anthropology are examined for an understanding of contemporary and past cultural issues such as the rise of civilization, origins of language, and the roots of social inequality.
3
ANT2100: Introduction to Archaeology
The basic theoretical and methodological principles of American archeology. The course covers the methods and tools used by archaeologists, the framework of inquiry and methods of recovery, analysis, interpretation and explanation.
3
ANT2423: (CD) Kinship and the Family
This course introduces students to the study of kinship and gender in an anthropological perspective. Topics covered include, but are not restricted to, gender distinctions, body images, descent, inheritance, courtship, love, marriage, family forms, kin networks, and new reproductive technologies. Students will be presented with detailed case studies both within and outside the Euro-American tradition.
3
ANT2930: Special Topics in Anthropology
Examination of topics of current importance in anthropology. Topics may vary. May be repeated for 6 credits.
3
ANT3101: Fundamentals of Archaeology
Archaeology is one of the four fundamental sub-fields of Anthropology in the United States. This course covers the fundamental analytical methods that have been and are currently employed by archaeologists to reconstruct past life ways, cultures, and societies. In particular, this course will explore the material culture studies and other evidence used by archaeologists. Topics of inquiry include excavation procedures, sites survey, dating techniques, site formation processes, paleo-environmental reconstruction, artifact analysis, and key laboratory techniques. Additionally, the course will cover the history of archaeological legislation and regulations that apply to public archaeology, ethical principles of archaeological practice, and the basics of curation and museumology. Finally throughout the semester, we will explore the importance and relevance of archaeology to the modern world.
3
ANT3212: (CD)(FC) Peoples and Cultures of the World
This course uses a comparative approach to investigative common bonds of culture and the ways in which Homo sapiens elaborate cultural differences. This course uses cross-cultural evidence to investigate some of the fundamental cultural building blocks of kinship, subsistence technology, and political behavior.
3
ANT3243: (FC) Comparative Muslim Cultures
This course concerns popular or local "Islams" throughout the world. This course will take an anthropological perspective and will use Muslim examples to explore the theoretical and methodological issues involved in the study of religion. We will also employ a variety of approaches to the study of religion to help the student understand a variety of social and cultural phenomena including religious education, the construction of gender identities, revitalization movements, fundamentalism, and religion and politics. The anthropological approach to Islam is clearly distinct from a theological or philological one. In other words, we will concentrate more on the culture and practice of contemporary Muslims than on Islam's sacred texts. We are particularly interested in the cross-currents that are found in otherwise diverse societies.
3
ANT3311: FC - Indians of the Southeastern U. S.
This course investigates the indigenous populations of the Southeastern United States. Material covered ranges from the prehistoric record to European Contact to the historic transformation and/or destruction of these groups. This class covers a broad range of topics and native groups.
3
ANT3312: (CD)(FC) North American Indians
This course examines selected Indian groups from a holistic perspective and compares different cultural complexes. Particular attention will be given to religion, world view, kinship, politics and economic subsistence patterns. A study of aboriginal Indian cultures will be used as a basis for comparison with current American cultures.
3
ANT3320: Native Peoples and Cultures of the Southwest
This course provides an overview of the pre-Columbian indigenous cultures of the North American desert west. It begins with an examination of the pre-Hispanic societies of the region. Lectures and readings will focus upon the appearance, evolution, and history of these traditions up through contact with Europeans. Students will then be exposed to the cultures currently existing within northern Mexico and the southwestern U.S. including; the Apache, Opata, Raramuri, Dine, Paiute and Ute, Yaqui, Huichol, Tohono O'odham, Hopi, Zuni, and eastern Puebloans. The course will also explore how contact with Europeans led to changes in these societies and how current political boundaries falsely divide the cultures of the region. Specific attention throughout the course will be placed upon a nuanced understanding of these unique cultures that is non-essentializing and non-imperialist and which does not mythologize the pre-Columbian "other".
3
ANT3340: Anthropology of the West Indies
This course examines the people and cultures of the West Indies from an anthropological perspective. We include the Hispanic, Francophone, and Anglophone islands of the Caribbean, as well as adjacent regions of Central and South America.
3
ANT3355: The African Diaspora
This course offers an overview of anthropological perspectives on the history and contemporary dynamics of the peoples and cultures of the African Diaspora. We will explore the sociocultural, political, and economic experiences of Africans "outside Africa" within the broader context of a changing global order in which diverse socially negotiated forms of identity are lived and expressed in culturally specific ways. Topics include but are not limited to identity, politics, economics, religion, resistance and revolution, music, art, and dance. Students will be exposed to a wide range of interdisciplinary literature and research designed to foster an appreciation for the diversity of the African Diaspora.
3
ANT3414: Principles of Socio Cultural Anthropology

Description: This course introduces students to the study of sociocultural anthropology, one of the subfields of general anthropology. It presents students with the interpretive frameworks and concepts needed to understand the impact of groups and their cultures upon the individual. This course aims to show the ways in which local and global cultural processes intersect and questions understandings of culture as homogeneous and discrete. This course also gives examples of some of the ways in which anthropology can be used to address some of humanity's problems such as racism, sexism, growing economic inequality, development, globalization, displacement, and environmental troubles. Finally, this course aims to present anthropology as a discipline that by embracing a bottom-up perspective contributes to enhance self-understanding and dialogue across culturally and socially diverse publics.
3
ANT3443: The City and Health
The majority of the world's inhabitants will live an in urban environment at the end of this decade. The urban environment contrasts sharply with environments that characterized human evolutionary history. This course considers the consequences of urbanization to human health and quality of life. Using popular and scholarly literature, other media, and guest lectures, students will survey the history of health and disease in relation to place. An emphasis will be placed on the role of the social environment in the production of disease and ask: How do human biology, evolution, history, and culture intersect with the social and physical environments to produce ill health? What characteristics of urbanization and urbanicity impact well-being? How can the social sciences help us explain disease patterns and promote health in an increasingly urban world? Instructional methods include didactic lectures, on-line assignments, reflection papers, and special projects.
3
ANT3514: Principles of Physical Anthropology
Physical Anthropology is the study of humans as biological beings in a cultural setting. This class introduces students to the key concepts, fossil discoveries, and underlying theories that define the field. The course looks at Homo sapiens from our biological variation to our evolutionary development. Topics include: Primates - Evolution and Behavior, Paleoanthropology and Hominid Evidence, Human Osteology and Forensic Anthropology.
3
ANT3610: Linguistic Anthropology
This course uses the concepts and techniques of modern linguistics to analyze and describe the phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics of human languages. The course focuses on languages other than English. Further issues of language in its social and cultural context are explored in the course Language, Culture, and Society.
3
ANT3740: Introduction to Forensic Sciences
This course is designed to introduce students to those scientific principles, techniques, methods, and technology that are regularly used for human identification. It will cover the latest in scientific data collection and analysis, including DNA fingerprinting, traditional fingerprinting, serology, toxicology, effects of ballistics on bodies, trace evidence, and forensic anthropology. The course will also explore methods of scientific data collection and handling, autopsies and cause-of-death determination, and processes of corpse decomposition. Throughout the course, students will engage in a variety of hands-on projects in which they will apply the scientific techniques and methods that they learn to collect and interpret data. Students will also engage in discourse that will explore how these scientific methodologies articulate with modern American social and cultural ideals, values, and norms. (A material fee of $7.20 will be assessed.)
3
ANT3933: Seminar in Anthropology
This course will prepare anthropology students for advanced coursework in the anthropological discipline. The course provides an opportunity for students to reflect upon the nature of anthropological inquiry and the variety of data anthropologists use to aid in that inquiry. Students will develop an understanding of the multitude of methodologies and techniques employed by anthropologists and how anthropological theories and models articulate with research questions. They will also be exposed to examples of applications of anthropology to concrete social problems. The course will help anthropology majors develop these skills and dispositions necessary to succeed as anthropology majors and to begin planning their future careers.
3
ANT4025: The Anthropology of Death
This course explores the anthropological perspective on the cultural, social, and biological nature of human death. Examples of topics that will be cover include: biological definitions of death, decomposition as it relates to funeral practices, global patterns of mortuary rituals and funerary behavior, the cultural construction of death, the effects of death on the social fabric, and cultural and social facets of mourning and bereavement. Throughout the course, students will examine the variety of social and cultural responses to the biological fact of death. In doing so, they will be exposed to the Anthropological literature that seeks to explain or interpret the tremendous variety of human behavior surrounding death and dying. The course will be cross-cultural, holistic, and bio-cultural in its outlook and will require students to make conceptual connections between theoretical literature and empirical observations.
3
ANT4034: Survey of Anthropological Theories
This class examines the historical development of anthropological theories and methodologies. Students will read and discuss seminal works in sociocultural anthropology.
3
ANT4083: Quantitative Methods in Anthropology
This course is structured to provide students with the analytic background necessary to conduct and evaluate quantitative research in anthropology. The major foci for the class will be on: unit construction and data collection protocols; the statistical tools necessary to conduct analysis of data sets; the design of scientifically valid research projects; and the graphical display of quantitative data. Examples from all four fields of anthropology will be presented in order to provide a broad empirical perspective. Additionally, this course will cover issues relating to research design, sampling, and institutional review board policy.
3
ANT4115: Archaeological Research Strategies
This course is an intensive survey of archaeological theory and research methods. It is intended for students interested in anthropology and the practice of archaeology. The course is designed as a seminar emphasizing discussions of weekly readings and student papers. This is not a hands-on lab or fieldwork course, but rather, we focus on the theoretical underpinnings of archaeology and the scientific method.
3
ANT4241: Anthropology of Religion
The cultural conceptions of supernatural reality with an emphasis upon comparative understanding of myth and ritual, the religious experiences and revitalization movements.
3
ANT4274: Political Anthropology
An anthropological examination of politics, including a cross-cultural comparison of political structures, leadership, factions, the politics of ethnicity and political change.
3
ANT4331: (FC) People of the Andes
The geography, history, culture and current status of South American Andean peoples.
3
ANT4352: (FC) Peoples and Cultures of Africa
This course is a survey of selected peoples and cultures of Africa. Topics covered include a reflection on cultural images of Africa in the West, basic information about the geography and history of Africa, and the study of specific African socio-cultural institutions such as political economy, religion, kinship, gender, art, and aesthetics.
3
ANT4362: (FC) Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia
This course acquaints the student with some of the peoples and cultures of Southeast Asia including foragers, farmers and urban populations. It examines prehistory of the region, the development of complex state societies, and the impact of world religions (Buddhism, Hinduism, and Islam) as well as European colonialism. It examines a number of key contemporary social and economic issues in the region, including deforestation, agrarian transformation, religious revitalization, and the changing status of women.
3
ANT4444: Cities and Globalization
This class introduces students to the study of urban life and the effects of globalization upon it in a variety of political and historical contexts. It focuses on cities and tumultuous sites in which new political, economic, and social identities are forged. Topics include but are not limited to global cities, transnational labor, diasporic communities, immigration citizenship, and cosmopolitanism. Students will be exposed and familiarize themselves with some of the qualitative research techniques used in urban anthropology such as participant observation, formal and informal interviews, the collection of life histories , and textual analysis.
3
ANT4451: Anthropology of Race
This course will introduce students to the uses and misuses of the concept of “race” from an anthropological perspective. Within the broad four-field approach of contemporary anthropology, “race” is recognized as a social construction with no biological validity. In this course, students will explore the concept as a social mechanism created during the eighteenth century and utilized to rationalize colonialism, resulting in enduring social hierarchies of inequality based on phenotypic differences.
3
ANT4497: Ethnographic Methods
This course is designed to introduce students in cross-cultural qualitative research. Students will gain the skills to critically evaluate and to conduct qualitative research. They will learn how to carry out research on their own and in a group setting. Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between data collection and theory. They will learn how to select an object of anthropological enquiry, which methodology to use, how to address ethical issues in field research, and the basics of research design and data analysis.
3
ANT4620: Language, Culture, and Society
Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. This course uses the concepts and techniques of contemporary linguistics to analyze, describe, and explain the relationships between language, culture and society.
3
ANT4905: Directed Independent Study in Anthropology
Students pursue under faculty supervision a research topic of the student's own choice. May be repeated for 12 credits under different topics.
3
ANT4931: Selected Topics in Cultural Anthropology

Description: Study of relevant issues in cultural anthropology.
Repeatability: May be repeated for 12 credits under different topics.
v. 3-6
ANT4970: Honors Thesis in Anthropology
Prerequisite:  Acceptance to the Honors in the Major in Anthropology and permission of instructor. This course provides Anthropology Honors students with the opportunity to work with one or more Anthropology faculty on an advanced thesis/research project. This course leads to completing an Honors Thesis and fulfills part of the requirements for graduating with the designation of Honors in Anthropology. Course can be repeated once up to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
v. 3-6
IDS3213: Introduction to the Metropolis
This course will introduce students to the field of urban and metropolitan studies from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will become familiar with the distinct patterns, processes, and institutions of urban and metropolitan areas as understood by scholars in social sciences, humanities, engineering, education, and health. In addition, by reading central works in the field and interacting with scholars and practitioners working in urban environments, students will examine theoretical and methodological approaches to the metropolis as an object of study and as a site for applied work.
3
SOW2031: Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work

Description: This survey course provides an introduction to our nation’s social welfare service system and the social work profession. Students will have an opportunity to learn about the history, values, ethics, methods, and practice settings of social work as well as the role social workers and social welfare policies and programs play in promoting social and economic justice for marginalized and oppressed populations.
3
SOW3203: Social Welfare Institutions

Description: This course will examine the historical development and contemporary administration of major American social welfare policies and programs and critically analyze the political, economic, and social impact of those policies and programs on diverse and vulnerable populations. Students will learn how social welfare policy impacts social work practice as well as how social workers engage in policy practice to advance social and economic justice.
3
SOW3213: Social Welfare Policy

Description: This course provides a historical overview and critical analysis of American social welfare institutions, policies, and programs. In particular, this course will examine the nature and evolution of major social welfare policies in the United States as well as the political, economic, and social impact of those policies on diverse populations. Students will be introduced to the basics of policy analysis and program evaluation.
3
SOW3293: Social Work Communication

Description: This is a skills-based course in which students will have the opportunity to develop and refine communication skills critical to effective and ethical social work practice with diverse client systems. Mastery of course content will provide students with fundamental social work communication skills, including interviewing and listening, corresponding with clients and colleagues, documenting service provision, and writing reports.
3
SOW3403: Social Work Research Methods

Description: This course examines quantitative and qualitative research methods in an effort to equip students with the knowledge, ethics, and skills to utilize research to inform social work practice. Mastery of course content will enable students to appraise research literature on social work interventions; to distinguish and critique the utility of research design, sampling, and measurement strategies to evaluate social work services; to protect the dignity and rights of human subjects; and, to evaluate social work practice as well as engage in career-long learning.
3
SOW3620: Social Work with Diverse Groups

Description: This course examines forces leading to individual prejudice and institutional oppression. The course will also explore issues of power, inequality, privilege, and resulting oppression. Students will learn about diverse groups in the community and reflect on working with such groups in social work practice. Mastery of course content will provide students with an understanding of and appreciation for diversity in self and others as well as a general knowledge of social work strategies to alleviate oppression.
3
SOW4101: Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

Description: This course provides an introduction to the social work view of the person in environment as well as an overview of theories of human development across the lifespan. Special emphasis will be given to the interactions between the person and family with systems of all sizes including groups, societies, and economic systems. The basic domains of system interaction (biological, psychological, social, cultural, spiritual, and identity) will be discussed especially as they relate to oppressed and at-risk populations.
3
SOW4102: Human Behavior and the Social Environment II

Description: This course provides students with theoretical knowledge of human behavior and the social environment in preparation for social work practice with diverse client systems at the mezzo and macro levels. Utilizing an empowerment perspective and systems framework, this course examines theories and knowledge of human behavior in the contexts of groups, organizations, and communities.
3
SOW4122: Inside the Asylum

Description: Inside the Asylum engages students in a critical examination of the history of American psychiatry. Students have an opportunity to explore the evolution of existing theories of the etiology of mental illness, the sociopolitical economy of psychiatry, the rationalization of involuntary hospitalization and treatment, and the development and utilization of common treatment modalities. Students also have an opportunity to learn about the consumer/survivor and deinstitutionalization movements as well as contemporary psychiatry’s growing reliance on psychopharmacological interventions. Particular emphasis is placed upon understanding the human rights abuses endured by individuals labeled as mentally ill and the social, political, and economic forces that negatively impact this disenfranchised group. This course will be of most interest and relevance to students who wish to work in mental health or human services.
3
SOW4302: Social Work with Individuals and Families
Prerequisite:  SOW 3203
Description: This course provides a foundation in generalist social work knowledge and skills for practice at the micro-level with individuals and families with special emphasis given to oppressed and at-risk populations. Students will develop interpersonal communication, assessment, and service planning skills. Special attention will be paid to the influence of personal values and biases as they relate to ethical social work practice. Strategies for the resolution of ethical dilemmas and culturally competent practice will be introduced and reinforced.
3
SOW4322: Social Work with Organizations and Communities
Prerequisite:  SOW 3203
Description: This course provides a foundation in social work knowledge, skills, and values for generalist practice with diverse client systems at the mezzo- and macro-levels in evolving organizational, community, and societal contexts. The role of social workers in advancing human rights and social and economic justice will be examined.
3
SOW4323: Social Work Practice with Groups

Description: This course focuses on the development of generalist practice skills for use in various group settings. Students will learn practice skills that contribute to group effectiveness in psycho-educational, socialization or support groups. These include group composition, structure, dynamics, goal setting, and evaluation. The course also examines the empirical bases for theories and models for generalist group practice.
3
SOW4352: Principles of Social Service Provision
Prerequisite:  SOW 3203
Description: This course is designed to provide students with a generalist foundation in the knowledge and skills necessary to provide case management and referral services to diverse populations in a variety of social services settings. Students will have an opportunity to develop interpersonal communication, networking, problem-solving, and ethical decision-making skills. Students will be required to engage in self-reflection regarding personal characteristics and biases and to think critically about controversial issues within the contemporary social service delivery system.
3
SOW4510: Practicum Seminar
Prerequisites: SOW 3203, SOW 4302, SOW 4322
Co-requisite: SOW 4511 The Practicum Seminar is a co-requisite of the Community Agency Practicum. The purpose of the seminar is to provide students with a structured environment in which to engage in self-assessment regarding their ability to apply knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom to practice with clients. Students will also examine personal values and biases as they impact interactions with clients and co-workers and apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills to experiences and ethical dilemmas encountered in the practice setting. Tools for networking, navigating a bureaucratic environment, continuing one's professional education, and addressing burnout and compassion fatigue will be examined.
1
SOW4511: Field Education I
Prerequisite:  SOW 3203, SOW 3293, SOW 3403, SOW 4XXX, SOW 4101, SOW 4102, and SOW 4322
Co-requisite: SOW 4522
Description: Field experience is integral to the education and professional socialization of social work students, providing a structured and supervised environment in which students may apply theoretical knowledge, test and refine practice skills, and adopt professional behaviors. Field Education I, the first of two consecutive courses, allows students to apply the generalist knowledge and skills acquired through academic courses to social work practice with a specific client system in a social services setting.
3
SOW4512: Field Education II
Prerequisite:  SOW 4511
Co-requisite: SOW 4523
Description: Field experience is integral to the education and professional socialization of social work students, providing a structured and supervised environment in which students may apply theoretical knowledge, test and refine practice skills, and adopt professional behaviors. Field Education II, the second of two consecutive courses, allows students to apply the generalist knowledge and skills acquired through academic courses to social work practice with a specific client system in a social services setting.
3
SOW4522: Field Seminar I

Co-requisite: SOW 4511
Description: Throughout the Field Seminar I, students will engage in a process of self-assessment, examining personal values and biases as they impact interactions with clients and co-workers. Students will apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to experiences and ethical dilemmas encountered in the practice setting. The fieldwork experience allows students to apply the generalist knowledge and skills acquired through academic courses to work with diverse client populations to bring about planned change. Tools for addressing burnout and compassion fatigue will be examined. Students will also engage in strategies to mitigate the emotional turmoil that often accompanies beginning social work with micro and mezzo client systems through the use of professional supervision and self-reflection exercises.
3
SOW4523: Field Seminar II
Prerequisite:  SOW 4522
Co-requisite: SOW 4512
Description: Throughout the Field Seminar II, students will continue to engage in a process of self-assessment, examining personal values and biases as they impact interactions with clients and co-workers. Students will apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to experiences and ethical dilemmas encountered in the practice setting. The fieldwork experience allows students to apply the generalist knowledge and skills acquired through academic courses to work with diverse client populations to bring about planned change. Special emphasis will be given to the planned change process on a macro level with organizations, communities and social welfare policy.
3
SOW4654: Social Work with Children and Adolescents

Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation of generalist knowledge and skills for social work practice with children, adolescents, and their families in a variety of practice settings, including educational, medical, child welfare, juvenile justice, and mental health services. Prevention, intervention, and advocacy strategies will be critically examined from the strengths perspective, emphasizing research-informed practice and social work values.
3
SOW4905: Directed Independent Study - Social Work

Description: This course covers selected topics through independent study under the guidance, direction and examination of a faculty member specializing in the particular area chosen by the student.
Repeatability: May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
v. 3-6
SOW4930: Special Topics in Social Welfare
This course will explore topics related to social welfare policy, practice, and research. The course may be repeated for a total of 9 credits under different topics.
3
SYA3300: Logic of Inquiry
Prerequisite:  STA 2014 or equivalent. This course is a general introduction to research methods in the social sciences, with emphasis on theory, measurement, research design, data collection and the ethics of research.
3
SYA3310: Qualitative Research Methods
Prerequisite:  SYA 3300. This course provides an overview of qualitative methods used in sociological research, including participant observation, interviews and archival research. Students will read exemplary studies, practice methods first hand, and learn how to use qualitative data to support an argument. Throughout the course we will discuss standards of ethical research.
3
SYA3450C: Social Science Data Analysis
Prerequisite:  SYA 3300. This course introduces students to quantitative analysis of social scientific data. The course is designed to teach students how to manage, apply, interpret, and compute quantitative data from both primary and secondary sources. The course will involve substantial usage of computerized analytical techniques.
3
SYA3930: Junior Seminar
Prerequisite:  SYG 2000 or equivalent. This course provides students majoring in sociology an opportunity to systematically explore the discipline.
3
SYA3931: Special Topics in Sociology
This course will cover variable topics in sociology. The course may be repeated for a total of 15 credits under different topics.
v. 2-5
SYA4010: Sociological Theory
Prerequisite:  SYG 2000 or SYG 2013, six hours of upper-division courses with prefixes SYA, SYD, SYG, SYO, SYP A critical study of the development of sociological thought and theory, surveying the major conceptual, theoretical and methodological orientations from Auguste Comte to the present.
3
SYA4654: Evaluation Research/Program Analysis
Prerequisite:  SYA 3300 or SOW 3404
Description: Program Evaluations are often required by government and private agencies to assess program processes and outcomes and used in decisions concerning whether programs should be continued, improved, expanded, or eliminated. In this class, we will explore the history of the program evaluation “movement” and the intersection of Evaluation Research and Applied Social Science. The course provides a framework through which the skill set developed in the basic research methods classes can be used to evaluate social programs in a variety of agencies, institutions and settings. Students will become familiar with a number of techniques and theoretical foundations utilized in Evaluation/Applied Sociology and provide hands-on experience working on an Evaluation/Applied Sociology project.
3
SYA4900: Honors Project in Sociology
Prerequisite:  Admission into Honors in the Major in Sociology and permission of the instructor This course is for students who are enrolled in Honors in the Major in Sociology and wish to conduct an independent project in sociology with a faculty mentor. In consultation with their faculty mentor, students will select the content of the project which may take a variety of forms, such as an empirical research project or a community-based project. This course leads to completing an Honors Project and fulfills part of the requirement for graduating with the designation of Honors in Sociology. Course can be repeated once up to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
v. 3-6
SYA4905: Directed Individual Study
Prerequisite:  Ten hours of sociology. Selected topics for independent study under the guidance, direction and examination of a faculty member specializing in the particular area chosen by the student. May be repeated a total of 6 credits under different topics.
v. 2-6
SYA4914: Sociological Research Experience
Prerequisite:  SYA 3300
Description: This course provides advanced undergraduate students the opportunity to work with faculty on an active research project. Students will complete research tasks as assigned by their faculty mentor using skills developed in the sociology curriculum.
Repeatability: This course may be repeated for up to 6 credits.
v. 2-6
SYA4930: Special Topics in Sociology
Exploration of topics of current importance in the field of social problems, social organization or the discipline of sociology. May be initiated by one or more faculty members or by students, in consultation with department chairperson. May be repeated a total of 15 credits under different topics.
v. 2-5
SYA4935: Senior Seminar
The substantive focus of this seminar is chosen by the instructor, and allows students to collaborate on a specific research project. The course will combine readings and lectures on the chosen topic with an application of relevant sociological theories and methods to produce an original piece of sociological research.
3
SYA4943: Sociology Internship
Prerequisite:  SYA 3300
Description: The Sociology internship is designed to give students a supervised pre-professional experience applying sociological knowledge and research methods in a community based organizational setting. Students will have the opportunity to identify projects and assess needs with the on-site supervisor, apply sociological skills of critical analysis and problem solving to organizational challenges, and develop their competencies navigating within a bureaucratic workplace setting. The internship experience will also assist students in identifying career paths, improving career skills, and developing a network of career professionals and mentors.
3
SYD3020: Social Demography
This course analyzes the social aspects of human populations around the world with particular emphasis on the US population. This course deals with census data, fertility, morality, migration and the diversity of the U.S. population.
3
SYD3410: Urban Sociology
This course reveals how sociologists understand urban development and the impact of urbanization on social life. Specific topics include the role of power in urban growth, cities as sites of inequality, the provision of public services, and social control in the urban context. Students will also examine contemporary urban social problems.
3
SYD3700: (CD) Racial and Cultural Minorities
An examination of selected racial, ethnic and religious subcultures with respect to past and present patterns of participation, minority-majority relations, maintenance patterns and consequences of prejudice and discrimination for American social life.
3
SYD3800: (CD) Gender and Society
This course is designed to explore the social meanings and political implications of gender in society. It will focus on gender as a taken-for-granted but problematic component of our lives, whether we are female or male. Sociologists now recognize that gender is a "social construction" which is open to re-definition and which has profound social implications. The course will explore topics such as: gender and sex role socialization; gender relationships; cross-cultural gender comparisons; and the effects of "the sex-gender system" on areas such as health, family life, religion, employment, crime, education, politics, and social change.
3
SYD4510: Environment and Society
This course provides a sociological approach to environmental problems. Specifically, the course examines four central issues surrounding environmental problems: (i) the nature, scope, and social consequences of environmental problems; (ii) the human causes of environmental problems; (iii) the human responses to environmental problems; and (iv) an alternative way of thinking about and responding to environmental problems.
3
SYD4601: Community Organization, Change and Development
Prerequisite:  SYG 2000 or equivalent. This course critically examines contemporary communities and neighborhoods in urban societies. The course examines community organizations, community power and leadership and alternative approaches designed to create community change and development.
3
SYD4702: Race, Place and Inequality

Description: This course will examine place as a dimension of stratification in the United States. Increasingly, the places where we live shape our life chances: they determine the quality of schools we will attend, our access to economic opportunity, and even the cleanliness of the air we breathe. While all U.S. citizens are ostensibly free to choose their place of residence, we find that in actuality access to place is highly segregated both economically and racially, and that these two facets of stratification intertwine. Understanding the processes that lead to place stratification, and the means by which places produce or reproduce different life chances, is central to understanding inequality in the U.S.
3
SYG2000: Introduction to Sociology
A study of sociological concepts essential for an understanding of individual, society and social structure. General concepts which integrate the field are considered so that more specialized courses may be understood in context.
3
SYG2010: Social Problems
A study of social conditions and situations judged to be undesirable or intolerable by the members of society and to require group action toward constructive form.
3
SYG2013: (CD) Sex, Race and Social Class: A Sociological Examination of Culture and Diversity
This class is designed to introduce students to the Sociological study of the issues of Race, Sex, and Social Class. In this class, we will examine a number of issues facing American society today and how these issues are inter-related. Special emphasis will be placed on discussing how those problems are (or are not) dealt with in our society.
3
SYO3110: Sociology of Sexualities

Description: This course explores the relationship between sexualities and society. This includes how sexualities influence our lives, as well as how they are reflected in social norms, attitudes and beliefs. Sexualities will be analyzed as social and historical constructions, differing across time and space. Questions asked will include: Is there one sexuality or are there multiple sexualities? What are the theoretical approaches to sexuality/sexualities? What do sexuality/sexualities have to do with race, gender and social class? How are sexual identities constructed? Finally, the course will examine how the social construction of sexuality/sexualities influences our relationships, whether or not those relationships are primarily sexual.
3
SYO3530: Social Stratification
An analysis of the economic, social, political and cultural dimensions of institutionalized social inequality, consequences for American social life and implications for social movements and social change.
3
SYO4100: Sociology of the Family
A cross-cultural analysis of patterns of courtship, marriage and family life, focusing on the relationship between family and other social institutions and the consequences of these relationships for the individual in a changing industrial social order.
3
SYO4200: Sociology of Religion
This course is an introduction to the sociology of religion. Students will read major works by leaders in the field, and examine the ways in which religion interfaces with and affects other social institutions. Particular attention will be given to current controversies in the social scientific study of religion.
3
SYO4300: Political Sociology
A sociological analysis of political institutions viewed as constituent parts of the structure of society and of social processes, with special attention given to contemporary political movements and ideologies.
3
SYO4370: Sociology of Work
Work is a social phenomenon because it is done with a variety of other people - bosses, co-workers, and subordinates. In addition to examining workplace experiences, this course emphasizes the integration and juxtaposition of work with the rest of people's lives. Students will be introduced to theories and concepts dealing with interactions and relations between and among workers, their employers, and their subordinates.
3
SYO4400: Health, Illness and Society
A critical analysis of the social context of health, illness, patient care and the practice of medicine. Of special interest are such issues as the distribution of health care, restraints and innovations in public policy pertaining to health and community health programs.
3
SYO4500: Sociology of Organizations

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major theoretical approaches used to study and understand work and organizations. The course will be interdisciplinary (incorporating insights from sociology, management, psychology, economics, geography, and political science) and multi-level (examining internal organizational dynamics, the relations and interactions among organizations, and the national institutional environment within which organizations and labor operate).
3
SYP3440: Social Change and International Development
This course analyzes social change in an increasingly interdependent world by comparing more developed countries to less developed countries. The course includes introductory information and perspectives on how social processes, relations and institutions within nations are affected by involvement in the modern world system.
3
SYP3570: Deviance and Social Control
A critical analysis of the political and social process involved in the creation, maintenance, treatment and control of deviant behavior and an examination of selected deviant subcultures.
3
SYP4050: The Sociology of Human Interaction
Focus is on contemporary sociological theories attempting to understand in terms of 1) the institutional context affecting the practical accomplishment of routine tasks and procedures in everyday life; and 2) the production of new institutional forms for example, role definitions, conventions, languages, codes.
3
SYP4351: Social Movements and Social Change
An examination of contemporary social movements directed toward the acceptance of new definitions of social roles; the development of alternative priorities, life-styles and conceptions of the individual in relation to social institutions and commitment to basic social change.
3
SYP4411: Sociology of War and Peace
This course will examine war, violence, and peace from sociological and cross-cultural perspective. The course will cover the core perspectives, ideas and analytical studies explaining the nature and causes of conflict and possibilities for its resolution. This course should provide students with a set of tools for analysis of contemporary civil and international conflict. Additionally, students will learn how to use evidence and theory effectively in explanation and argument about these conflicts.
3
SYP4660: Sociology of Culture
This course introduces students to the sociological study of culture, including how culture relates to inequality, social organization, and social structure. Students will become familiar with empirical work on the production and uses of cultural goods, as well as classic and contemporary theoretical accounts of the role of culture in social life.
3
SYP4730: The Sociology of Aging
An inter-cultural examination and analysis of 1) changes-in status, rights, roles, and circumstances which appear to come with age, 2) influences-of age-related biological and physiological factors on the individual's performance and behavior in society, and 3) adjustments-both societal and personal, to the events and processes of aging.
3