Past Events for the Office of Faculty Enhancement

2014:

 


 Returning to the Classroom: Teaching Students with Military Experience 

 

  http://dl.ccec.unf.edu/vod.php?vod=TeachingMilitaryStudents.mp4 

2014


Faculty & Staff Appreciation BREAKFAST

Every year, along with the Annual Convocation event, we celebrate all faculty and staff with a Faculty & Staff Appreciation meal. Traditionally, we would have a picnic with seating outside for everyone to enjoy. This year, because the Annual Convocation ceremony will be occurring earlier in the year, and because of Florida’s unpredictable weather, we are changing the appreciation meal to a Faculty & Staff Appreciation BREAKFAST. The Faculty & Staff Appreciation Breakfast will be held in the Osprey Café (click for map) on the same day as Convocation, Friday, Sept. 5th, from 7:30-9:30 a.m. Come and enjoy a special breakfast meal with your colleagues and coworkers from around the campus. The chefs at the Osprey Café  have prepared a special menu just for this event. The Faculty & Staff Appreciation Breakfast is free to faculty and staff. 
The meal will require a ticket. We encourage each department to order tickets for their staff. To order your tickets, please complete the information survey at http://bit.ly/unfappbrkfst. Once you have ordered your tickets, you can pick up your tickets on Monday-Friday, from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon, and from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. at the Office of Faculty Enhancement (click for map), Building 16, Room 3111.

 

We look forward to enjoying this time of celebration and recognition with our friends and colleagues from across the campus.

 

For more information contact:

Dan Richard
Director, Office of Faculty Enhancement

(904) 620-1446

drichard@unf.edu

 

or

 

Erin Kendrick

Program & Event Coordinator, Office of Faculty Enhancement

(904) 620-1452

erin.kendrick@unf.edu

2012


Designing Successful Transformational Learning Opportunities (TLOs)

Faculty and staff interested in applying for Transformational Learning Opportunity (TLO) funds are invited to attend the TLO workshop titled, "Designing Successful Transformational Learning Opportunities (TLOs)." This session will provide an overview of the TLO concept, some examples of past successful TLOs, and guidelines for applying for financial support.   


Teaching Students with Military Experience

UNF and the Jacksonville Community have welcomed those with military experience. More and more, instructors are noticing differences in the responses and perspectives of students in their classrooms who are military veterans. In this session, Dr. Tracy Hejmanowski, Clinical Psychologist and Director of the Deployment Health Center at the Naval Hospital in Jacksonville, will discuss how the experiences and resulting perspectives of student veterans impact their psychological and ideological viewpoints as well as their capabilities and motivation in the college classroom.  The cognitive and emotional challenges of student veterans struggling with PTSD and persistent post-concussive syndrome will also be discussed, as it may impact classroom and instructional dynamics. An awareness of the scenarios that require sensitivity to student veterans' needs will help faculty minimize class disruption and maximize educational gains.

 
This event is sponsored by the  Office of Faculty Enhancement  and the  Military and Veterans Resource Center  and is supported by a grant from the  Prudential Foundation .

2011


The Ten Commandments of Networking BROWN BAG (FLOWHE)

Florida Office of Women in Higher Education (FLOWHE) Presents: 
The Ten Commandments of Networking
Presenter:Lynne Coggin, Franchise Owner, Referral Institute 

Ms. Coggin provides consulting, training and coaching to successful entrepreneurs with a focus on the relationship-based referral marketing plan. She is a member of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, BNI Hurricanes Chapter and the Arlington Toastmasters Club. With a degree from the American Business and Fashion Institute, Ms. Coggin has more than 30 years of experience in sales management, corporate training and retail buying. The topic for discussion, The Ten Commandments of Networking, based on The World’s Best Known Marketing Secret by Dr. Ivan Misner and Mike Macedonio. Bring your lunch!  


Effective Presentations with Prezi

Prezi is a free online tool for creating and showing presentations. It breaks from the bulleted-list approach of Microsoft PowerPoint and Apple Keynote. Unlike other presentation software that uses slides, Prezi presentations are more similar to concept maps or poster presentations. 

Click here to link to the presentation

 

Sponsor: Center for Instruction and Research Technology, Office of Faculty Enhancement 


Presidential Professorship Lecture: Aquaculture

 aquaculture
Aquaculture provides valuable protein to meet the demands of a growing world population. In this John A. Delaney Endowed Presidential Professorship Lecture, Dr. Greg Ahearn (Department of Biology) will discuss aquaculture activities in the U.S. and abroad and will address specific research that contributes to its continuing success. A reception will immediately follow the lecture.
RSVP by Thursday, October 6 (use the "Register Now" link above or call 620-1623).
Presented by Academic Affairs and The Office of Faculty Enhancement"


Transformational Learning Opportunity Workshop

Faculty and staff interested in applying for Transformational Learning Opportunity (TLO) funds are invited to attend the TLO workshop titled, "Deep Learning: Designing Successful Transformational Learning Opportunities (TLOs)." This session will provide an overview of the TLO concept, some examples of past successful TLOs and guidelines for applying for financial support.  

 

Click here to view the presentation slides. 


FLOWHE Brown Bag Lunch for Sharing and Networking

Wellness for Women…REFRESH…RELAX…RENEW An Experiential Event of Stress Reduction and Desk Yoga.
Presented by Susan Byrne Lee
Bring your Lunch!     

You can bring the physical into your everyday life at work at home at play. This special session will cover the "Relaxation Response" as developed by Dr. Herbert Benson. You will learn how to use these personal skills just minutes a day to de-stress and feel great!


Susan Byrne Lee is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Certified Yoga Instructor and Member of the international Association of Yoga Therapists presenting outstanding Integrative Health and Wellness programs for over twenty years. She is also the Winner of the Speaking of Women’s Health Award for excellence in promoting Women’s Health in Northeast Florida


Florida Office of Women in Higher Education (FLOWHE) Brown Bag Lunch for Sharing and Networking

(Free Parking is available at the URC in the surrounding lots.)  

Bring your Lunch!  

    

Are You An Entrepreneur? Factors to Consider When Starting a Small Business  

Diane Denslow, Instructor in Entrepreneurship at the University of North Florida, Certified Business Analyst for the Small Business Development Center  

Diane Denslow served as faculty and the Associate Director for the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University. She has instructed numerous university classes on Small Business including Planning a New Business, Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Business Plan Development, Entrepreneurial Marketing, Family Business Management and Small Business Analysis and Assistance. Diane is the co-author of a text entitled So You Need to Write a Business Plan and has conducted research on success factors for women owned businesses and has written in purchasing, marketing, and entrepreneurship publications.  

    

Florida Office of Women in Higher Education (FLOWHE)  

Since 1973, the Office of Women in Higher Education (OWHE) of the American Council on Education has provided national leadership in the advancement of women into executive positions and campus presidencies. As a subsidiary of the American Council on Education, the major coordinating body for all the nation's higher education institutions, OWHE has flourished nationwide. Providing leadership and a unifying voice on key higher education issues and influencing public policy through advocacy, research, and program initiatives, OWHE is a higher education networking organization created by women, for women.  

    

For more information on FLOWHE, please contact our FLOWHE Institutional representative: Karen Arlington, Project Coordinator, Office of the President, Open Campus at karlingt@fscj.edu  or 633-8317. You may also contact Dr. Lynn Jones at UNF, lcjones@unf.edu  or 620-1394.  


Promotion & Tenure Panel

Please join faculty from across the campus for the annual Promotion and Tenure Panel discussion. Dr. Mark Workman, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, along with faculty from a variety of disciplines, will discuss the criteria for the awarding of promotion and tenure and will address the many factors that are involved in successfully navigating the tenure and promotion process. Assistant, Associate, and new faculty members are especially encouraged to attend.


--CANCELED-- What's Hot in Allied Health Funding? --CANCELED--

The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs and the Office of Faculty Enhancement will sponsor a collaboration session on What’s Hot in Allied Health Research Funding. The participants will teleconference with Program Officers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) who will discuss current trends in Health related funding and who will answer questions from the group about future funding opportunities. The participants in small, multidisciplinary groups then will discuss opportunities that exist at UNF that match these current trends in the field. Researchers in the Allied Health field as well as those in associated or supportive fields are encouraged to bring their ideas and to discuss possibilities for collaboration with other researchers at UNF.

Coffee and snacks will be provided.


Class Time is Thinking Time

The College of Arts & Sciences and the Office of Faculty Enhancement will sponsor a presentation by Robert Duke, author of Intelligent Music Teaching: Essays on the Core Principles of Effective Instruction. Dr. Duke is  the Marlene and Morton Meyerson Centennial Professor and Head of Music and Human Learning at The University of Texas at Austin.  In this presentation, titled "Class Time is Thinking Time," Dr. Duke will address why formal education often fails to make substantive and lasting changes in how learners think and behave, and he will encourage us to design learning experiences that lead to advantageous changes in cognition, affect, and behavior, all of which are components of expertise in every discipline. Come and join the discussion and learn some helpful tips on applying the science of human learning to the classroom and beyond.


About Proposals: Deep Strategy and Tactics

 

The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) and the Office of Faculty Enhancement (OFE) offers a workshop on developing successful grant proposals. Join us as we host Dr. Eric Shulenberger, former program officer and experienced principal investigator (PI). Dr. Shulenberger will present “About Proposals: Deep Strategy and Tactics” and  discuss grant proposal topics from his unusually well-grounded, extremely practical, and blunt perspective as to what works, what does not work, and why. Researchers wanting tips for writing successful grant proposals will be especially interested in attending this session. This session will be useful to researchers who have either extensive experience or little experience with writing and submitting proposals. Light refreshments will be served. Admission is free. Submit reservations for this session by clicking the "Register Now" link.


Identifying Opportunities for Growth and Progression in an Organization

 

Our distinguished guest is Shari Shuman.  Shari is currently the Vice President of Administration and Finance at the University of North Florida, where she oversees 16 departments and more than 400 employees.  In addition, she serves as the University of North Florida Foundation Treasurer, which has an endowment of more than $66 million.  Before coming to UNF in 2003, Shari worked for the City of Jacksonville, serving in a number of critical financial and leadership roles including Chief of Staff for the Jacksonville Economic Development Commission, City Treasurer and City Comptroller.  She is also active in the community, serving on the River Garden Hebrew Home for the Aged Board of Directors and the Board of Directors for the Jacksonville Jewish Center as Chair of the Investment Committee.  Shari received her undergraduate degree in Accounting from the University of Florida and her Master of Public Administration from UNF.  


What’s Hot in STEM Funding? Research Collaboration Session

The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) and the Office of Faculty Enhancement (OFE) will sponsor a collaboration session on What's Hot in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Research Funding. The participants will have a conference call from a Program Officer at the National Science Foundation ( NSF) who will discuss current trends in STEM related funding opportunities. The participants then will discuss in small groups opportunities that exist at UNF that match these current trends in the field. Researchers in the STEM field are encouraged to bring their ideas and to discuss possibilities for collaboration with other STEM researchers at UNF. Coffee and snacks will be provided. To register for the Collaboration Session, contact ofe@unf.edu.

2010


Grading in Three Acts: Act 3: The Surprise Ending (Hopefully Not!)

All’s well that ends well. At the end of every semester, many faculty members make decisions on grades that must be defensible to grade challenges. Students have multiple life issues that will affect their final grades, and faculty members are required to record grades despite these issues. In this session faculty members will discuss questions in assigning final grades including how to weight grades in Blackboard, how to report final grades, how to deal with incomplete work, and when and how to change grades for students after the semester has ended. Faculty members are encouraged to bring their examples of challenges with assigning final grades to add to the discussion.


Grading in Three Acts: Act 2: Things Get Ugly with Grade Integrity

It may be easier for students to cheat than ever before. Technology in today’s society provides a number of opportunities for students to engage in academic misconduct. In this session, faculty members will discuss various questions related to academic integrity including what defines academic misconduct, what policies are in place to deal with academic misconduct, how can one deal with issues of academic integrity in online environments, and how can one prevent plagiarism and academic misconduct. Faculty members are encouraged to bring their academic misconduct policies to apply ideas discussed in the session.

Presentation Slides

Handout

Academic Dishonesty Brochure


Designing Effective Transformational Learning Opportunities (TLOs)

Transformational Learning Opportunities (TLOs) are enriching learning experiences designed to facilitate significant student learning as well as student personal and professional development. TLOs are supported by the Office of Undergraduate Studies, which provides funding on an annual basis for faculty-led transformational learning projects such as internships, study-abroad experiences, service-learning projects, and undergraduate student research projects. This session will provide an overview of the TLO concept, some examples of past successful TLOs, and guidelines for applying for financial support. 


Grading in Three Acts: Act 1: Setting the Stage with Grading Plans

Effective grading takes a strategy. In this session, faculty members will discuss various approaches to assigning grades and the implications of these approaches. Questions that will be addressed include how assignments should be weighted in grading, how to deal with incomplete work, whether participation should be counted toward a student’s grade, and whether final grades reflect actual learning. Faculty members are encouraged to bring their grading policies with them to apply ideas discussed in the session.


Stretch Your Noodle - Interspecies Difference, Pseudospeciation, and the Nature of Violence

In a disaster situation, why would most people choose to save a fellow human's life rather than the life of a dog? Why have people from so many cultures around the world come to believe that their enemies were more like animals than themselves? Dr. Bart Welling, Department of English, will discuss the distinctions we make between the animal and the human and the ways in which our ideas of species can influence our behavior towards human and nonhuman beings. We will be devoting special attention to violent behavior and some of the conditions that can produce it, including a dangerous phenomenon that the psychologist Erik Erikson termed "pseudospeciation."; Come and join the discussion and enjoy a noodle lunch.


Stretch Your Noodle: Are You Smarter Than a Chimpanzee?

Ayumu, a 7-year old chimpanzee at Kyoto University can memorize the location sequence of 5 numbers after they have been presented for only a fraction of a second (http://games.lumosity.com/chimp.html). Many humans who attempt this task for the first time fail miserably. Of course, Ayumu has had lots of practice. In this Stretch Your Noodle session, Dr. Iver Iversen, Department of Psychology, will discuss the amazing abilities of non-human primates and the process by which these amazing abilities are developed. Dr. Iversen will present his work on developing complex drawing and sorting tasks in chimpanzees and will discuss the implications of his work on teaching humans who have limited language ability. Come and join the discussion and enjoy a noodle lunch.


Supporting Student Success with SkillSoft

Life is complex, and teachers often provide complex assignments to assess students' understanding of important course concepts.  The success of these complex assignments requires students to have specific skills. Students, however, often have vast differences in preparation on basic skills, leading to frustration on the part of the teacher and the student.  The Office of Faculty Enhancement (OFE), the Center for Instruction and Research Technology (CIRT), and the Center for Professional Development and Training (CPDT) have teamed up to provide information and examples of one solution to the problem. SkillSoft is an online tool designed to help individuals develop basic technical skills (e.g., Microsoft Excel, PowerPoint, etc.) and personal development skills (e.g., time management). In this session, faculty members will provide examples of how the SkillSoft training website can help students build essential skills outside of the classroom. These online skill-building courses can be integrated as part of a larger project within a course or as an add-on to existing course assignments. Bring your lunch. Dessert and beverages will be provided. 

To reserve a classroom equipped for Skillsoft training, please click here  (for rooms 15/1104, 1201, 1202) or contact Tiffany King  for classrooms in the new COEHS building (57/2500, 2520)  


Community-Engaged Research: Conducting Program Evaluation in Community Settings

Conducting research in community settings can be extremely rewarding and extremely challenging. Dr. Cheryl Fountain, Executive Director of the Florida Institute of Education, and Dr. Jeffry Will, Director of the Center for Community Initiatives, will address these rewards and challenges in this session on organizing and conducting community-based research. Some of the issues addressed in this session will be ensuring the integrity of data from community partners, navigating the political dimensions of program evaluation, and negotiating funding contracts. Researchers interested in having their work take on a community-based focus will be particularly interested in this session. Bring your lunch. Desert and beverages will be served.
For access to the notes for this event, please go to
http://twitter.com/ofeunf


Bizarre Creatures: Vegetarians with Claws

Sometimes nature surprises us. That is what happened to Dr. Barry Albright, Department of Physics, when he unearthed Nothronychus graffami, a 13-foot tall dinosaur discovered in southern Utah. The skeletal remains revealed teeth suited to eating vegetation, yet the skeleton included large sickle-like claws, much like the ones donned by the famous Velociraptor. Dr. Albright will explain the find and discuss how such a beast would have survived. The discussion will include how new species are identified from fossil records. 

2009


"Machine Intelligence": Visual Analytics, Your Medical Records, and the Limits of Computation

What can computers do better than humans, what can humans do better than computers, and why? Why can't my medical records in hospital X be perused by physicians in hospital Y? As technology advances, people are learning new ways to interact with machines. Dr. Arturo Sanchez-Ruiz (School of Computing) will lead a discussion on how computational thinking, visual analytics, and just-in-time virtual environments offer the potential of making our lives better and how these advances are presenting challenges for humans and machines. Come and join the discussion and enjoy a noodle lunch.

  • Presentation --Arrows within the text are hyperlinks to external material.


Making Groups Work: Technology and Cooperative Learning

A CIRT-OFE Cooperative Event
One benefit of group assignments is that they require students to work in much the same way that they will be working outside of the college environment. Coordinating and managing these assignments among students can be a significant challenge to the teacher and students alike. In this session, Deborah Miller, Director of the Center for Instruction and Research Technology (CIRT), will provide examples on how to use practical technology solutions for managing group assignments. Some of the tools discussed will include Wikis and the Group Collaboration area in Blackboard.


Study Abroad: What are students learning?

Sponsored by the International Center and the Office of Faculty Enhancement, planned in observance of International Education Week
It is commonly believed that study abroad experiences change students’ understanding of the world, make them global citizens, and help them secure their future. But, how are these benefits of participating in study abroad realized?  Do students actually learn more than how to make an international telephone call, or where to find the best bratwurst in Munich? Can study abroad experiences affect intellectual development?  Is there a relationship between participating in study abroad and creativity?  What does the research say? Come find out these answers and participate in a faculty round-table discussion at this session presented by the Office of Faculty Enhancement and the International Center.  The results of research from a variety of studies will be presented, and participants will be invited to discuss how these research results relate to their own efforts to affect student learning through study abroad.  


Community-Based Scholars Program Information Sessions

Sponsored by the Center for Community-Based Learning and the Office of Faculty Enhancement
The Center for Community-Based Learning is seeking applications for its inaugural Community Scholars Program.  The Community Scholars Program is a professional “community of practice” to support UNF faculty members and student affairs professionals in the practice of Community- Based Transformational Learning (CBTL) pedagogies.  All full-time, tenured, tenure-earning, and non-tenured earning faculty members and student affairs professionals with interests in community-based transformational learning are eligible (some restrictions apply). The Community-Based Scholars Program Information Sessions will inform those interested about the program details and application guidelines. Anyone interested in CBTL are encouraged to attend. 


Going Beyond the Page (and Onto the Pond): Writing on Water

Boundaries of thought and imagination restrain us from invention and marvel. Dr. Clark Lunberry, Associate Professor of English, has shown us how to cross those boundaries into new ways of expression. During this Stretch Your Noodle event, Dr. Lunberry will discuss his long-term “writing on water” project that involves the installation of large-scale poetry in the landscape. The presentation will focus upon both the practical dimensions of these installations, but also equally upon their theoretical and pedagogical repercussions in which language itself has been materially and conceptually re-enlivened by these projects, re-imagined as liquid resonance, as floating form. Photographs of this on-going project can be seen at his website: <http://www.unf.edu/~clunberr >. Come join the discussion and enjoy a noodle lunch.


How Engaged are our Students? A Wine and Cheese Conversation

In the Spring of 2009, over 900 UNF students (freshmen and seniors) completed the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), and over 300 faculty completed the companion Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE). The NSSE results from 2006 and 2009 were compared with the results of over 600 colleges and universities nationwide. It is time to listen to the voices of UNF students and faculty and to understand where we excel and where there is room for improvement. Dr. Judy Miller, Executive Director of Assessment and Dr. Dan Richard, OFE Director invite you to join the conversation, consider the results of the NSSE surveys, and discuss their implications. The results of the NSSE surveys provide (sometimes surprising) food for thought. At this wine and cheese session, we will consider selected NSSE results, with a focus on those that relate to the classroom, and consider where we might go from here.


Applying for Summer Teaching Grants

What are your summer plans? Academic Affairs provides Summer Teaching Grants to support faculty efforts in improving their teaching. Faculty are encouraged to develop improved and innovative instructional strategies for use in their current or new courses. In this session, a panel of Summer Teaching Grant reviewers and awardees will provide advice and facilitate a discussion with faculty about how to prepare successful Summer Teaching Grant proposals. Faculty who are interested in serving as reviewers or who will be applying are especially encouraged to attend. Refreshments will be provided. 


Deep Learning: Designing Successful Transformational Learning Opportunities (TLOs)

Transformational Learning Opportunities (TLOs) are enriching learning experiences designed to facilitate significant student learning as well as student personal and professional development. TLOs are supported by the Office of Undergraduate Studies, which provides funding on an annual basis for faculty-led transformational learning projects such as internships, study-abroad experiences, service-learning projects, and undergraduate student research projects. This session will provide an overview of the TLO concept, some examples of past successful TLOs, and guidelines for applying for financial support.


Making Learning Meaningful: Integrating Community-Based Learning and the Classroom

Community-Based Transformational Learning (CBTL) will be a signature of UNF learning experience in the near future. In this brown-bag session, Dr. Mark Falbo, Director of the Center for Community-Based Learning, will discuss how faculty can incorporate community-based learning strategies into their existing courses. Dr. Adel El Safty, Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering, will provide an example of how community-based learning and research can be successfully accomplished within the context of undergraduate student learning. Faculty are encouraged to bring their ideas and questions for the discussion. Desert will be provided.


Grading Student Writing Assignments Efficiently and Effectively

One of the biggest challenges in teaching is time management. When students turn in writing assignments, their work often requires a considerable amount of time to review and score. When teachers spend excessive amounts of time grading and providing critical feedback on student writing, they can find themselves falling behind on other responsibilities. Dr. Sam Kimball, Chair of the English Department, and
Dr. Jeanette Berger, Writing Coordinator, will provide a model of guiding student writing assignments and providing critical student feedback. The model allows students to develop a “self-talk” editing dialogue that helps the student revise their work before submission and helps teachers provide efficient feedback to students. The presenters will provide writing evaluation tools that will help faculty save time and enhance student writing.


Engaging the Whole New Mind: Creativity and UNF Reads

Are colleges adequately preparing students for an ever-changing work environment? How can faculty encourage students to engage in creative problem solving? During this session, Dr. Susan Vasana, Electrical Engineering, will lead a discussion on how to facilitate creativity in student problem solving. Dr. Marnie Jones, Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, will discuss the UNF Reads program and how faculty can use portions of the book, A Whole New Mind by Daniel Pink, in their class discussions and assignments. Daniel Pink suggests that students today should develop creative thinking skills to be competitive in the changing economy. Bring your ideas and join the discussion.


How to Demonstrate Excellence in Scholarship in Your P&T Dossier

Organizing, formatting, and writing a promotion and tenure dossier can be a time-consuming yet rewarding task. One of the major requirements for promotion and the awarding of tenure is demonstrating proficiency (either Excellent or Outstanding merit) in scholarship. Time in this workshop will be devoted to identifying and developing ideas for the structure and content of the scholarship and research portion of the P&T dossier. Faculty members who will be preparing their dossiers in the next few years are encouraged to attend this workshop.


How to Demonstrate Excellence in Teaching Effectiveness in Your P&T Dossier

Organizing, formatting, and writing a promotion and tenure dossier can be a time-consuming yet rewarding task. One of the major requirements for promotion and the awarding of tenure is demonstrating proficiency (either Excellent or Outstanding merit) in teaching. Time in this workshop will be devoted to identifying and developing ideas for the structure and content of the teaching portion of the P&T dossier. Faculty members who will be preparing their dossiers in the next few years are encouraged to attend this workshop.


Teaching with the Times: Incorporating the New York Times into your Courses

This event was modified/rescheduled as a web-based seminar. If you desire further information or assistance, contact Petra Kohlmann, Education Regional Sales Manager for The New York Times, at (800) 792-6962.


OFE Promotion and Tenure Panel Discussion

Please join faculty from across the campus for the annual Promotion and Tenure Panel discussion. Dr. Mark Workman, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, along with faculty from a variety of disciplines, will discuss the criteria for the awarding of promotion and tenure and will address the many factors that are involved in successfully navigating the tenure and promotion process. Assistant, Associate, and new faculty members are especially encouraged to attend.


Value & Challenges of Collaborative Research: Faculty-Student Forum

Undergraduate student research presents one of the greatest opportunities for student learning. These research opportunities often are challenging, engaging, and transformational for the student as well as for the faculty mentor. Dr. Chuck Paulson will lead a panel discussion on the value and challenges of this type of collaborative research. Dr. Kathaleen Bloom, Dr. Mary Borg, Dr. Matthew Gilg, and student Lianne Bronzo will serve as panelists. The panelists will address some of these questions: What are some of the opportunities for success in working with undergraduate students on research? What are some models of student-faculty collaborative research? How does the lab environment compare to the classroom in being able to teach students about research methods and the research process? The session will end with questions/comments from the audience.


Engaging Students in Large (and small) Classes: Adding Interaction

Presented by The Office of Faculty Enhancement and the Center for Instruction & Research Technology
Session participants will discuss the use of techniques designed to increase student interaction in courses. We will discuss the role of choice in students’ selection of lecture topics and the use of student polling during class time to increase student interaction. We will discuss a variety of methods including voting cards, clickers, and cell phone polling systems. Bring your own strategies, techniques, and challenges for the discussion.


Classroom Civility: Student and Faculty Demands (Faculty Conversation)

Is the classroom becoming a site of increasing incivility between students and faculty? Have you had some classes where students seem to have a pervasive sense of negativity? Do you find yourself challenged by the way students react to what you see as reasonable requests and class policies? How do we help match student expectations with the expectations of their professors? What factors might account for this development? What forms of incivility are most common and disruptive to the learning environment? What strategies might faculty employ to create and sustain a productive learning environment? Dr. David Jaffee, Assistant Vice-President of Undergraduate Studies and Professor of Sociology will lead a discussion on classroom civility and the unique challenges that occur as we balance the needs of teachers and students. We invite you to bring your stories, thoughts, and ideas and come prepared to discuss these issues that affect faculty and students campus-wide. Refreshments will be served.


Various Forms of Student Engagement and Student Learning

Presented at the 2009 SoTL Commons Conference in Statesboro, GA 
Previous research indicates that student engagement is multi-dimensional. Numerous engaged or active learning strategies (e.g., think-pair-share, problem-based learning, interactive games) emphasize some dimensions of student engagement but not others. The current project assesses the learning impact of a diversity of active learning strategies employing various dimensions of student engagement within three sections of a course in Social Psychology. Direct assessment of student performance on multiple-choice exams as well as indirect assessment of student preferences for learning activities will be addressed. In this session, participants will review original research on student engagement, receive examples of course activities, evaluate these activities on dimensions of engagement, and review the results of a research project that evaluates the effectiveness of these strategies on student learning.


Beyond the ISQ: Assessment of Student Learning Part 2

Every semester, students complete Instructional Satisfaction Questionnaires (ISQs) regarding their perceptions of faculty and course effectiveness. The Beyond the ISQ workshop will provide practical methods to assess teaching effectiveness and student learning that extend beyond indirect assessment of student perceptions of learning. Participants are asked to attend with a specific course and with specific student learning outcomes in mind. Time in the workshop will be devoted to identifying and developing ideas for assessment within the selected courses.


International Beer and Share Event

Faculty who have led a study abroad course as well as those who are interested in knowing more about leading a study abroad course are welcome to attend the International Beer and Share event. Join faculty from across the university in sharing experiences from past study abroad activities and in hearing about future study abroad activities. Participants are encouraged to bring a sampling of beer or other beverage from the country or region in which their study abroad course will be held. Refreshments will be served. Door prizes will be given to lucky winners!


Learning Partners: Developing Community-based Transformational Partnerships

The University has begun an exciting journey to enhance the quality of its students' learning. The focus of this Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) is on transforming student learning through exposure to community-based environments. In this presentation, Dr. Jennifer Kane and Dr. Chris Janson will lead a discussion on best practices in community engagement and student learning. The discussion will focus on developing and maintaining community partners for collaborative learning experiences and research.


Stretch Your Noodle Series – The Amazing Stability of Teaching Effectiveness Ratings

Do college students’ ratings of a professor’s teaching effectiveness suggest that a professor’s teaching improves with time? Does anything predict which instructors receive the highest ratings or improve the fastest? In this “Stretch Your Noodle” installment, Dr. Adam Carle will discuss his research using longitudinal growth models to examine whether students’ ratings of teaching effectiveness change across time and whether online vs. face-to-face, tenure, discipline, course level, sex, or minority status affect ratings and rates of change in these ratings. This work shows surprisingly little change in effectiveness across time. It also suggests that students consistently rate minority professors in face-to-face classes less positively. Come join the discussion. Share what you think leads to these findings. And, enjoy a noodle lunch.

2008


Stretch Your Noodle Series – The Strange Reality of our Quantum World: Modern Applications of Quantum Weirdness

In this installment of the Stretch Your Noodle Series, Dr. Robert Vergenz, Department of Chemistry & Physics, will tickle our curiosity with Quantum Weirdness. In 1965 the famous scientist, Richard Feynman, gave a detailed explanation for the layperson of why "... nobody understands quantum mechanics." There are good reasons to believe this is still true today. This will be a guided tour (for the layperson) of modern experimental tests of the most counter-intuitive aspects of the fundamental assumptions of quantum theory. We will examine potential applications such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, and quantum computers. We will discuss implications for our understanding of the universe and our place in it. Come join the discussion and enjoy a noodle lunch.


Beyond the ISQ: Assessment of Teaching Effectiveness and Student Learning

Every semester, students complete Instructional Satisfaction Questionnaires (ISQs) regarding their perceptions of faculty and course effectiveness. These questionnaires are used in annual evaluations, promotion and tenure decisions, and meritorious awards provided for faculty. The Beyond the ISQ workshop will provide practical methods to assess faculty effectiveness and student learning that extend beyond indirect assessment of student perceptions of learning. Dan Richard from the Office of Faculty Enhancement will discuss data from UNF’s ISQ initiative as well as from previous research on student evaluations of teaching.


International Social for Faculty

In celebration of International Education Week, all faculty are invited to meet the Faculty Leaders of the new International Regional Councils as well as fellow faculty interested in international activities. The purpose of the 5 Councils is to improve and enhance communication between individual faculty with common international interests across different UNF colleges. The Vice President for Student and International Affairs, in conjunction with the Provost/VPAA, is promoting the Councils with the expectation that a central point of coordination will engender and cultivate the sharing of potential research initiatives and/or broad-based academic programs. Refreshments provided! Door prizes given away to lucky winners!


Critical Thinking: Assessing Student Critical Reflection

The Office of Faculty Enhancement (OFE) and the Center for Instruction and Research Technology (CIRT) will lead a discussion on assessing critical thinking and student learning. Faculty members from across campus will discuss how to evaluate critical thinking through rubrics, through writing, and through the use of emerging technologies (such as Student Response Systems and Wikis). Evaluating critical thinking through multiple choice exams also will be addressed. 


Critical Thinking: Philosophy and Practice in the University Setting

Dr. David Fenner, Department of Philosophy, will lead a discussion on the definition of, the development of, and the use of critical thinking and its implication for the university setting. Dr. Mary Borg, Department of Political Science and Public Administration, will present research on the effectiveness of using critical thinking to promote learning in higher education. Faculty are encouraged to discuss the how critical thinking affects student learning in a variety of courses spanning multiple disciplines.


Faculty Research Forum: Social Sciences and Engineering

Have you been dreaming of a research project but have not had the resources to pull it off? Have you wondered what other researchers at UNF are working on or have you considered collaborating on projects but haven’t had an opportunity to talk with other researchers? The Office of Faculty Enhancement (OFE) and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) would like to invite you to the first in a series of forums to discuss opportunities for research, collaboration, and funding. This forum will focus on research in the social sciences and engineering. Faculty will hear from researchers who have been successful, and time will be reserved for relaxed discussions over refreshments.


OFE Finals Break-away: Demystifying the QEP

The University is embarking on a pathway to enhance the quality of its students' learning. This Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) is becoming part of UNF's strategic vision for itself as well as a stepstone for University reaccreditation. Its focus is to transform student learning through exposure to community-based environments. Douglas Eder, Associate Provost, Institutional Effectiveness, will lead the discussion to acquire broad faculty and staff insights and, together, to demystify the QEP. We invite you to take a break from routine work for an hour and engage in conversation with us on this topic.


OFE Promotion and Tenure Panel Discussion

Please join faculty from across the campus for the annual Promotion and Tenure Panel discussion. Dr. Mark Workman, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, along with faculty from a variety of disciplines, will discuss the criteria for the awarding of promotion and tenure and will address the many factors that are involved in successfully navigating the tenure and promotion process. Assistant, Associate, and new faculty members are especially encouraged to attend. 


What Figure Skating Taught Me about Teaching, Learning, and Reaccreditation

Douglas Eder will present “What figure skating taught me about teaching, learning, and reaccreditation.” It is said that “practice makes perfect.” This old saying implies improvement, but improvement does not occur via repetition alone. In a purely repetitive environment another saying operates: “If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always got.” The crucial missing element necessary for improvement is feedback. In effective teaching and learning, at least two feedback loops are important: One for the student and one for the pedagogue. Assessment has tried to provide this kind of feedback but, alas, has commonly failed to do so, existing instead as a needed but disliked tool on the way to reaccreditation. This session of shared participation will demonstrate assessment scaffolding around which educational institutions build substantial improvements in student learning and professors’ teaching, all while saving individual professors' time and energy. 


Metamorphosis: Transformational Learning and the Study Abroad Experience

New and experienced faculty will discuss several practical and pedagogical strategies for producing student learning, student engagement, and transformation in TLO and study abroad activities.


International Beer and Share Event

Faculty from across the university share experiences from past study abroad activities and hear about future study abroad and TLO activities. Faculty are encouraged to bring a sampling of beer or other beverage from the country or region in which their Study Abroad/TLO will be held.

2007


Faces of Undergraduate Research at UNF: Scott Brown, Department of Art and Design

A dynamic and growing community of UNF scholars and students are reshaping the role of research and creative collaboration in undergraduate education. As a University, we are making the case that scholarly and professional experiences at the undergraduate level are truly transformational learning experiences. UNF students are writing, speaking, publishing, and doing—undertaking authentic professional research and service projects on issues as broad as gopher tortoises, geotechnical engineering, public health in Africa, Mayan hieroglyphs, medieval cathedrals, iron casting, cognition and the psychology of fear, and playing Carnegie Hall. Join other UNF faculty and students to share your own experiences, successes, and questions about undergraduate research at UNF. Learn about funding and support opportunities. Share ideas about the possibilities for developing and institutionalizing undergraduate research. Discuss the intellectual and social impact of undergrad research. Research matters: What does it mean to the future of UNF?


Grading and Assessment: Who cares?

At the end of each semester, we find ourselves attempting to summarize each student with a single grade. A grade reflects many things to many people. To our students, it represents one thing, perhaps entrance to graduate school or a job. To faculty, it represents another, possibly a summary of a student’s achievement. To parents and society, grades may represent yet other concepts. How we assign grades, what they mean, what they should mean, and what they do mean, sees vigorous debate and study. Dr. Adam C. Carle, from the Department of Psychology, will describe several methods of grading, highlighting issues surrounding each. He’ll use the time to foster discussion among faculty. We’ll examine formative and summative assessment, grading plans, and grade assignment (relative vs. absolute grading). This open forum intends to encourage debate and understanding among faculty with regard to grading as a philosophy


Validating Cross-Cultural Changes in Drinking Patterns Across Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Caucasians

Adam Carle
Overview: Research has suggested that drinking patterns are presently changing cross-culturally across Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Caucasians, with use levels increasing among Hispanics and remaining relatively stable among non-Hispanic Caucasians. However, the possibility exists that assessment tools may be differentially reliable and/or valid across multiple populations and that observed findings do not reflect true differences or similarities. This suggests the possibility that differences in drinking patterns described in recent literature may result in part or in whole from cross-cultural differential item functioning (DIF). As a result, prevention and intervention efforts may be hindered by inadequate estimates of abuse and dependence across these groups. The current study used confirmatory factor analysis for ordered-categorical measures (CFA-OCM) to probe for DIF across Hispanics and non-Hispanic Caucasians in a recent (2002), large (n = 43,093) representative sample of the United States, the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), and assess the validity of cross-cultural variation in drinking patterns by incorporating the results of the measurement model into an analysis of drinking patterns across Hispanics and non-Hispanic Caucasians. The presentation will discuss findings and implications.  

2006


Syllabus Workshop: Solving Common Teaching Problems Through Good Practices In Syllabus Construction

Chris Rasche
This seminar addresses how to avoid or solve some of the most common teaching problems through the thoughtful creation of the course syllabus. The workshop will discuss the alleviation of typical class management or grading issues, especially in large classes, through the inclusion (or exclusion!) of certain kinds of items in the course syllabus and adopting good practices in syllabus construction. The workshop will discuss traditional components which really should be included in all syllabi, plus additional components which may help to avoid or solve some of the most frequent problems encountered in college teaching today. In particular, the legal status of course components will be discussed in terms of what faculty can require from, or enforce upon, students in a course, versus what kinds of requirements would be illegal or difficult for the University to support. Karen Stone, UNF Legal Counsel, will assist with this portion of the workshop and be available to answer questions pertaining to the legality of various kinds of potential course requirements.


Brooks College of Health Teaching-Learning Seminar

Learning to Learn, Jace Hargis
This session describes the criteria for learning; models of how we learn; different ways people learn; and give faculty tools to create courses that are based on effective strategies to facilitate student learning. In addition, the session provides several different active learning strategies, such as projectbased learning, advanced graphic organizers, and an introduction to using technology as instructional tools.


Better Understanding for Informed Learning Design (BUILD)

This hands-on seminar is for all faculty interested in improving their teaching and learning. Faculty applications will be judged by their vision, creativity, philosophy and dedication to teaching and learning.


Teaching International Awareness without Books, Face Time, Phones or Computers, with Steve Paulson

The underlying activity involves the exchange of student created metaphors for their own and others’ cultures where the exchange is facilitated by an instructor who does the traveling.


Faculty Fellow Presentation – David Fenner: Teaching and Assessing Critical Thinking

In this presentation we begin by considering both the UNF General Education vision of critical thinking along with some general comments, gleaned from the recent literature, concerning a definition. We then move to explore some models, originating in different disciplines at UNF, of how critical thinking is conceived. We explore a discipline-based case of teaching critical thinking (in art criticism), taking from this some general thoughts about teaching critical thinking across disciplines. Finally, we consider two models – an outcomes-based model and a process-based model – of how, as a component of our General Education program, the teaching of critical thinking might be assessed.


Faculty Fellow Presentation – Sanjay Ahuja: How Networks Work

This seminar is intended for a broad audience and explains the workings of network systems without getting caught up in network jargon. Learn the basic principles of networking and how those principles work inside pieces of network equipment. This session will focus on modems, broadband access from home, local area networks (LANs), and home wireless networks.


Faculty Fellow Presentation – Bart Welling: Environmental Conflict Resolution Exercise Debriefing

The UNF Environmental Center invites faculty members in every discipline to attend the debriefing of UNF’s first Environmental Conflict Resolution Exercise. Students played the role of stake-holders (developers, city planners, environmental justice activists, and more) in the ongoing debate over Jacksonville’s toxic ash legacy.