Undergraduate TLO Awards Round 3

Summer 2008  -  Summer 2009
Faculty/Staff Leader Nature of the Experience
Ahmed, Parvez and Horvath-Neimeyer, Paula Communicating Across Cultures: Business and Communication in the Arab and Muslim World

The goal of this TLO is to help prepare students to communicate and conduct business in a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic and otherwise diverse world. The need to provide students with knowledge about intercultural communication becomes more pressing each year as our increasing personal mobility, expanding global economy, changing demographics, and advancing mass communication technology bind the world even closer. Our increased contact with other cultures makes it imperative that we make an effort to understand people who may be very different from us.  Both the increasing friction between the United States and other countries around the world and the increasing tide of globalization heightens that imperative.  This TLO will focus on one of the most critical regions today – the Middle East. 

This proposal is for establishing a new model for transformative learning. The proposal combines three elements – inter-disciplinary learning, cross-cultural collaboration and study abroad. The entire experience will be for 6 credit hours and students will be required to sign up for the entire 6 credit hours. In the classroom, students will examine economic, cultural, historical, social, political and religious issues in the Middle East.  They will explore cultural themes and patterns, business conduct and characteristics, and emerging trends.  Outside the classroom, they will engage in a process of understanding “the other” on a first-hand basis in an attempt to both build bridges between the Middle East and the United States and establish a clear path to international business success.

Categories:

International

Christie, Cathy and Rodriguez, Judy A TLO in Belize for Undergraduate Nutrition Students

This proposal is a request to partially support a study abroad program to the country of Belize, each of which is heavily populated by one of the four cultural groups found within the Belizean populace. The proposed transformational learning experience involves a two-week study abroad course to the Central American country of Belize for 16 undergraduate students (along with 4 graduate students) from the Brooks College of Health. The students will be accompanied by three UNF faculty, Drs. Rodriguez, Christie, and Watkins during late spring (May), 2008.  The 16 students will be divided into teams of 4 persons and each team will be overseen by one faculty person and a graduate student. Dr. Rodriguez will guide all teams activities related to community assessments, cultural food habits, multicultural counseling skill development, and cultural competency training. Drs. Catherine Christie and Watkins, along with a graduate student, will oversee the teams’ inpatient and public health service activities, respectively. This includes, for Dr. Christie, student experiences related to working with Belizeans on nutrition assessment, nutrition diagnosis, medical nutrition management and relationship of diet to disease outcomes. For Dr. Julia Watkins, this will involve guiding students in helping the graduate student’s community based or research project.

Categories:

International

Cox, Daniel Cultural Enrichment for Engineering Students while Performing Research in Germany

A National Science Foundation International Research in Engineering Education (NSF IREE) has been awarded to the PI, Daniel Cox, of the NSF sponsored “Florida’s First Coast Manufacturing Innovation Partnership” (MIP) Program in the School of Engineering at UNF. The NSF IREE supports technical exchange between UNF and the Cologne University of Applied Science (CUAS) in Cologne Germany. This is a technical research grant that also has the goals of developing a greater interpersonal relationship for Americans and the members of the global societies. The PI and six UNF engineering students will travel to Cologne in the summer of 2008.

While the NSF IREE provides support for the stay in Cologne, additional opportunities are pursued for expanded cultural experiences in Germany through this TLO proposal opportunity. The students will be spending time with and actively engaged with students at CUAS. This TLO provides additional opportunities for the students to become more engaged with the more citizens and culture of Germany. Germany has a wide array of cultural opportunities. The students have suggested some of these that they would like to experience. Unfortunately, the funding by NSF, while significant, will be limited mostly to support the stay in Cologne. Although Germany is large, it is easily commutable by rail and many unique cultural experiences are available by day trip. There is large number of more significant experiences available by overnight stay at the farther reaches of the country from Cologne. The TLO proposal will support an estimated six to eight additional cultural experiences over the three month period. Some will occur on the weekend while some may occur during the week on occasion either partially or in full.

Categories:

International
Undergraduate Research

Ladendorff, Marcia The Ghana Project: A Project-Based Approach to Service Learning in West Africa

The Ghana Project is based on an interdisciplinary team-taught course where students learn about West Africa and the developing world on campus for a semester, and then participate in a twenty-one day study trip to Ghana.  The specific service projects that the students participate in while in Ghana are developed based on community needs as identified by our partners in the local communities.  These needs change as the country of Ghana itself develops.  The projects create multiple learning opportunities.  At one level they teach civic engagement, at another level they challenge students to apply their learning in areas like Economics and Nursing to real-world (real developing world) issues.  At yet another level the projects require students to work closely with local people, challenging them to communicate across cultural barriers.

In 2009, we plan to present new and different projects to our students.  We will move the health and political projects to a new part of the country (the Volta Region) as we have done as much as we are capable for these projects in the North.  Nursing students will work in a hospital setting and the rest of the students will collaborate with the civic union serving this area.  The civic union has asked us to help them conduct public opinion surveys similar to the surveys we conducted with the West Mamprusi District in 2005 and 2007.  Engineering students have expressed an interest in carrying out a re-design of the water drainage infrastructure for the Tamale Children’s Home in the North.  A number of senior engineering students are creating an analysis and plan for this re-design for their senior design project.  The idea is to take that re-design and execute it during our trip in 2009.  We would partner with Ghanaian construction workers through an NGO.  Either engineering faculty or the engineering mentor for the senior design students would accompany us on this trip to provide expert supervision of the project.

Categories:

International
Service Learning

Lupi, Marsha International Short-term Internships in Plymouth, England

The funding requested in this proposal will assist COEHS student teaching interns in applying for the invaluable experience of practice teaching, learning and living in another country. A selected group of students who academically qualify and are recommended for this experience, will travel to Plymouth, England where they will participate in a daily teaching internship for three weeks in either an elementary, special education or secondary education classroom. Participating schools have been selected that offer comprehensive K-12 programs and a dedication to making this an excellent learning situation for UNF students. This proposal expands previous student teaching internship opportunities to include secondary education placements.


The international internship experience will serve as a culminating activity to the required fourteen week internship semester in Jacksonville.  Students will be required to participate in all aspects of the school day and week for the three week period. They will have the unique opportunity to meet weekly with the head teacher (Principal) of each school to engage in discussions about the curriculum and organization of the British school system. They will also be attending a weekly seminar with UNF faculty and using the campus resources including faculty members, provided to them by their mentors at the host university where they will reside in Plymouth, The College of St. Mark and St. John (Marjon).

Categories:

Field Experience
International

McMahan, Carolynn International Advertising and Broadcasting: Experiential Study Abroad to Taiwan, China, Hong Kong

The proposed teaching and learning opportunity for which funding is requested is an experiential study abroad course to expose students to the facets of international communication, specifically advertising and broadcasting, within three dynamic and contrasting markets in Asia, Taiwan, China and Hong Kong. This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand the challenges and barriers to international advertising within the Asian market, such as the legal and regulatory aspects in regards to media and the cultural differences in regards to consumer behavior. Students will examine the industry, culture, and societal issues in order to gain an understanding of how to effectively communicate to consumers within these differing Asian markets. Students will also have the opportunity to attend classes and interact with international students and faculty from two Asian universities, specifically Tatung University and Renmin University. 

This study abroad program would be a common boundary course, combining two new courses, International Advertising and International Broadcast/ Journalism. Students would initially work on real case studies and projects developed by the multinational corporations within the host countries due to established relationships with Frank Koch, Marketing Director, Proctor and Gamble in Taiwan; and Malcolm Sullivan, Vice President of Marketing in Asia for Federal Express. These connections with multinational corporations were established on a site visit to Taipei, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, funded by an International grant and the Communication department.

Students, working in groups, would be assigned a case study from one of the multinational corporations. Initially students would work on the project by conducting secondary research into the host country’s business environment including cultural, political, technological and regulatory factors. Students would then travel to Asia for two weeks to interact with company executives and their advertising agencies, meet with media organizations, while also interacting with students and faculty at Tatung University and Renmin University to further work together on finalizing the projects. Tatung University has agreed to partner with UNF and provide on-campus housing in Taiwan and Renmin University has committed to meet with students and arrange for tours and meetings with both students and faculty. As for the media organizations, due to connections with China Central Television (CCTV) and leading television institutions in Beijing, such as Beijing TV (BTV), students will visit these facilities and meet with media executives. CCTV is the official broadcaster of the Olympics Games and BTV is the largest broadcaster in the Beijing area.

Categories:

International

Robinson, Tim Study Abroad Scholarships

Study Abroad Scholarships for individual student applications.  Funds for these scholarships will be used by individual students for the international study activity of their own choosing (must be credit bearing, with 3 credits minimum required). Students will be required to identify the particular study abroad activity they will use the funds for. If a scholarship recipient does not participate in the identified study abroad activity, he/she will be required to return the scholarship funds.  NOTE:  PRIORITY WILL BE GIVEN TO STUDENTS APPLYING FOR A UNF EXCHANGE PROGRAM, A UNF-CONNECTED PROGRAM, AND/OR ANY OTHER PROGRAM THAT HAS A FORMAL RELATIONSHIP WITH UNF.  OTHER PROGRAMS MAY BE SUPPORTED, ON A FUNDS-AVAILABLE BASIS, IF APPROVED BY THE UNF INTERNATIONAL CENTER AND BY UNF ACADEMIC ADVISORS FOR CREDIT TRANSFER.   The programs allowed for these scholarships will vary in length from 3 weeks to a full semester (most will probably be semester in length based on 2007-2008 experience). Scholarships are anticipated to be in two categories:  short term ($500) and long term ($1,000).  The former would be for a summer or shorter study abroad activity (10 awards); the latter for a semester or longer study activity (20 awards).

Categories:

Directed Independent Study
International

Schwam-Baird, Shira French Language Study Abroad Program in Strasbourg, France

The proposed program is the Strasbourg French language and culture study abroad program already in existence. The program consists of four weeks in Strasbourg, France during which the UNF students learn French fifteen hours a week (total of 45 official contact hours) in a language school where native speakers teach the classes entirely in French—no English whatsoever—and their classmates come from all over the world. Moreover, they live with French families with whom they take two meals a day, so their immersion experience continues outside the classroom and real cultural contact fills the greater part of most days.

As faculty leader, I teach a culture class (Faces of France) three afternoons a week and conduct their many excursions—short afternoon visits to places of interest in the city, full-day Saturday excursions in the region around Strasbourg, and a long weekend in Paris (total 75-80 contact hours with excursions). An example of a full-day Saturday excursion: a visit to the only Nazi-era concentration camp on French soil, Struthof, a picnic at a castle ruin, a visit to a restored castle, and a tour of a small Alsatian village. Afternoon excursions in Strasbourg include visits to two important European institutions, the European Parliament and the European Council (both seated in Strasbourg), the Strasbourg cathedral, and other churches and museums in the city. The weekend in Paris focuses on both history and art, but also imparts the sense of Paris as a vibrant city where people live and work, not just a massive museum for the world’s tourists.

Categories:

International

Steagall, Jeff Semester Study Abroad Scholarship for Business Students

The proposed TLO funding would partially support fifteen Coggin College of Business undergraduate business majors studying abroad for a period of one semester or longer. A typical semester is approximately 16 weeks, although there is variation in both directions depending on the host institution and country. The TLO scholarship will be $1500 per student, and will help defray travel and lodging expenses. Coggin offers approximately twenty semester exchange opportunities at partner institutions worldwide, and several more will be added during 2007-8. The TLO funding could be used toward any of these programs. One advantage of exchange programs is that the cost to students is minimized, since the partners do not charge tuition or fees for our students. Semester study abroad is recognized as one of the most transformative experiences that a student can have. Both the length of the stay abroad and the “otherness” that it entails contribute to the level of student transformation. Living and studying in a foreign location for a four-month period forces the student to learn to deal with new and difficult situations, to overcome homesickness, to begin learning a new language or improve their existing foreign language skills, to live in a foreign culture and have time to begin to appreciate it, to begin to question their own cultural biases and perspectives, etc.

Categories:

Directed Independent Study
International

Shaw, Sherry Undergraduate Study Abroad and Mentored Interpretation Research

This proposal presents the opportunity for UNF’s students of American Sign Language/English Interpreting to study abroad for 20 days at two renowned institutions in the field of translation/interpretation studies: The Karl-Franzens-University of Graz and the University of Vienna, Austria. Students will also travel to Slovenia for a view of working spoken language translators/interpreters. Students will attend translation and interpreting classes with the local students in Graz and Vienna who have English as one of their three working languages. They will participate in Austrian Sign Language classes, which are taught without voice, and will interact with Austrian Deaf instructors for a rich cultural immersion into a visual language that is very different from American Sign Language. Students will be enrolled in Applied Research in Interpretation and spend time discussing their research designs with interpretation research faculty at both institutions, Dr. Franz Höchpacker and Mag. Nadja Grbic (both extensively internationally published in the field). Students will work on literature reviews in the Institute of Theoretical and Applied Translation Studies’(Graz) vast translation library, accessing all the journals published in the interpretation discipline. A translation and interpretation agency (called Translat) in Maribor, Slovenia will host the students for a weekend at a countryside lodge and provide a seminar on “Applying Interpretation Theory to the Real World of Translation and Interpretation.” Students will tour the historic town with the owner of Translat as their personal guide.

Categories:

International
Undergraduate Research

Zeiser, Pamela Long-Term Study Abroad Support for International Studies Majors

All students majoring in International Studies must complete an international educational experience as a requirement for graduation.  The major requires coursework in the fields of anthropology, economics, geography, history, and political science, all of which prepare students for international experiences.  Many students participate in short-term, UNF faculty-led study abroad programs and can thus benefit from TLO funding.  Increasingly, however, International Studies majors are considering semester- or year-long study abroad programs but find the costs prohibitive.  This TLO would provide $1,500 travel scholarships for each International Studies major enrolling in a semester- or year-long study abroad program.  Students will choose the programs best-suited to their individual academic needs and interests, though all will be approved by UNF’s International Center to qualify for funding. 

Study abroad in any form is transformational for students.  They can experience other cultures and customs, understand global issues and events from other perspectives, gain a new perspective on and appreciation for their own country, and gain self-confidence and independence.  In the era of globalization, such experience is important to all students.  We all need to be global citizens and better prepared to compete in the global economy.  For students majoring in International Studies, such a transformational experience is vital.  These are students planning on careers in the foreign service, international business, US government agencies, international organizations, and education.

Categories:

Directed Independent Study
International

Zhao, Mei and Haley, Rob Health Care and Culture in China: The Qingdao Experience

Financial support is being requested for students to participate in a study abroad enrichment program focusing on China’s healthcare system.  This program will be developed in collaboration with Qingdao University’s College of Medical Science.  Qingdao is located in China’s Shandong Province and is China’s fourth largest manufacturing port.  As a result, its healthcare system is challenged as it serves individuals of different nationalities, cultures, and socioeconomic status.  Each student is expected to spend at least 6 hours per day over a 6-day period comprised of in-class curriculum with Qingdao University pertaining to China’s healthcare system.  In addition, on-site visits to the Medical Care and Health Centre for Women and Children, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Qingdao Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Qingdao Haici TCM Hospital are being planned.

This course provides the opportunity for UNF students to directly interact with China’s university students who are of the similar age and professional interests but are of a different culture.  Students will understand the culture of providing healthcare in China’s Shandong Province and will gain direct experience and knowledge of students, healthcare administrators, healthcare institutions, and public health issues in Qingdao.  UNF faculty leaders will work with Qingdao University faculty to develop and administer a rigorous curriculum for UNF students.  UNF Faculty will facilitate and engage students in discussions with high-level officials to understand the challenges of a healthcare system that is characterized by a population that is 80% uninsured.  Also, the comparison of both healthcare systems will provide a unique opportunity for UNF students – the future health care leaders to better understand the health care issues that we are facing today and possible solutions in the future.

Categories:

International

Borg, Mary Public Policy Internship Initiative

I would like UNF to become a national leader in providing real world experiences to our students. Internships will be offered for varying amounts of time ranging from one to two months during the summer to a full semester. Potential internship sites include:


Locally:  Mayor's office, US Congressional local offices, State Representatives’ local offices, ACLU, FBI, local businesses, political campaigns, Florida Times Union, local television and radio stations.
State:  Governor’s internship program, State Representatives’ Tallahassee offices, State agencies.
Washington, DC:  Washington Center internships, State Department, International Embassies, Congress, Government Agencies  National Democratic Institute, National Republican Institute, US Institute of Peace, The Brookings Institution, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Woodrow Wilson Center, Stimson Center, National Endowment for Democracy, Refugees International, International Crisis Group.
New York City:  International Refugee Committee, Human Rights First, Concern, Lawyers Committee, International Crisis Group, Security Council Watch, International Center for Transitional Justice, Center for Cooperation at NYU, ABC, NBC, CBS, and CNN.


Internships are transformational in a number of ways.  They provide students with first-hand knowledge of career opportunities in their chosen discipline.  They allow students to build practical skills and apply their discipline-specific knowledge to real world situations. They provide valuable work experience and contacts that will benefit them when they are looking for jobs after graduation.  They help students build their confidence as they realize that they can compete in the world of work.  In addition, the opportunity to live in a major US city or in another country for two months is one of the biggest advantages for some of our students who may never have left home before.

Categories:

Directed Independent Study

Bowman, Ray St. Johns River TLO

Students will prepare for a spring immersion experience on the St. Johns River by working with faculty mentors in their respective major disciplines during the previous fall semester and by reading the book “River of Lakes” by Bill Belleville.  Each student will design a project to be executed on the river 2008-09, most probably during Spring Break, 2009.  The faculty mentor will be responsible for guiding the development of a project worthy of one academic credit (to be awarded at the conclusion of the spring 2009 term) and will hold the student mentee accountable for completion of the project.  A final “deliverable” will be required as appropriate for the discipline, for example a scientific report, a completed series of paintings, a term paper, etc.  The students will be on a houseboat for 8 ½ continuous days primarily in the middle portion of the St. Johns River.  They will visit state parks, springs, tributaries, and other points of natural significance and interact with authors, historians, scientists, engineers, artists, and musicians about the river and its people. 


An important feature of the student-designed projects is that they must be shared with the other students on the trip, a Project-Based Educational (PBE) approach.  Time will be scheduled during the trip for the students to peer teach and after the trip to report the results of their project to the whole group.  Further, the group as a whole will choose and execute a group project such as a video program, a group manuscript based on a log of trip events, etc.

Categories:

Field Experience

Butler, Joe A Study in Restoration of Gopher Tortoise Habitat on the UNF Campus

I studied a population of gopher tortoises living in the southwestern quadrant of the UNF campus in the early 1990s (Butler et al. 1995, Butler and Hull 1996, Butler and Sowell 1996).  At that time the habitat underwent periodic controlled burning on about a three year cycle.  These controlled burns prevented shrubs and taller trees from shading the ground, thus allowing low growing plants which tortoises eat to thrive.  The area has not been burned for over a decade and the canopy is more closed to the sun, and thick shrubs such as palmetto have taken the place of plants more useful to tortoises.  The tortoises residing in the southwestern quadrant appear to be limiting their movements to the few open canopy areas, particularly along the dirt road. I propose to select a number of sampling areas in that quadrant and open the canopy using two techniques.  The value of the techniques will be assessed by determining if more tortoises use the treated areas.  The work will be completed (as much as it can be) by a graduate student and a team of undergraduates, and it will be the basis for a Master’s thesis.  Additionally, after familiarizing themselves with the literature each undergraduate will select a project of his/her own involving the tortoises and their habitat.  Some projects which lend themselves to undergraduate study are tortoise nesting and incubation, plant diversity, feeding preferences, demographic evaluation, burrow orientation, etc.  The important issue will be that students choose their own projects.  Most projects will require assistance from the entire team.

Categories:

Undergraduate Research

Davies, John Media Coverage of Environmental Issues in Northeast Florida

The proposed TLO is an extension of a research-based, interdisciplinary teaching project currently being conducted by John Davies (Dept. of Communication) and Casey Welch (Dept. of Sociology). The current project is a collaborative effort between the Department of Communication and the Department of Sociology designed to enhance the opportunities for active learning among students from both disciplines. Students from two classes are currently participating in the project: SYA 4930, Media and Society, and MMC 3614 Media Theories and Effects.

In this project, students are engaging in teaching and interacting with their peers within and across disciplines. Basically, students in Sociology are reading, analyzing, and synthesizing key research about media for their counterparts in Communication. Students in Communication are using the information provided by the Sociology students to analyze and integrate media theories and concepts from their own classes with the research. Throughout the Fall 2007 semester, small groups of students from both disciplines are meeting periodically to present and discuss their findings in a panel presentation / Q & A format.


It is anticipated that approximately 10 students from both classes will participate in the proposed TLO as an opportunity to take the theories and concepts learned in the classroom and extend and apply them to address an issue facing residents in Northeast Florida. Specifically, students will conduct a three phase investigation: 1) participate in research and information gathering activities designed to identify major environmental issues specific to Northeast Florida, 2) conduct a content analysis of the local media coverage of said issues, and 3) communicate the results of their findings to the campus community, residents of Northeast Florida, and the academic community.

Categories:

Undergraduate Research

Gabbard, Chris The Exceptional Body in the Cultural Eye: Disability in Literature, Education, and Society

Two aspects characterize this Spring 2009 community-based TLO proposal. First, the TLO entails a literature course focusing on the reading and analysis of (primarily) literary texts in which disability is prominently featured. And second, it mandates volunteer work either with children with disabilities (at the Mt. Herman School or at the Developmental Learning Center) or with adults with disabilities at the Independent Living Center of Northeast Florida or at ARC Jacksonville. The students will convene for two class sessions per week to discuss assigned texts, and they will serve as volunteers for a minimum of two hours per week at Mt. Herman, the DLC, the Independent Living Center or ARC. Students will volunteer at times that accommodate both their schedules and these organizations’ needs.

Categories:

Service Learning

Harwood, Paul Campaign 2008: The Political Engagement of America's Youth

This TLO will give every UNF student the opportunity to participate. Its objective is simple- to teach students the importance of political and civic engagement. One of the primary causes of low political and social capital among today’s youth is their perception of alienation from the political process. In short, the issues that dominate the U.S. policy (prescription drugs, homestead exemptions etc.) are remote from the concerns of college students. This TLO allows the issues which concern college students- America’s youth- to be heard and illustrate the necessity to our students to be responsible, civically engagement citizens. This objective will be achieved via several means. First, every UNF student will have the opportunity to pose a question for inclusion on a national telephone survey of American adults. The survey will exclusively be on the issues that concern our students. Second, some 350+ students, from a variety of classes across campus will be involved in collecting this survey, analyzing the generated data and putting together public relations materials to disseminate the survey’s results to the national media. Third, 35-40 students will be enrolled in a special topics 3000 level POS course entitled Political and Civic Engagement: Polling the Public. This course (with open enrollment, rather than exclusively for political science majors) will explore 1) in a traditional classroom setting the decline of social capital and civic engagement in America. Here the works of De Tocqueville, Putnam and the like will feature. This will provide students with a theoretical grounding in civic engagement. 2) Utilizing applied in-field pedagogy Political and Civic Engagement: Polling the Public will provide a “hands-on” experience of building a survey instrument, putting a survey into the field, and disseminating its results to the news media-vital skills in an increasingly competitive job market. The survey results will highlight the necessity of political participation to our entire student body.

Categories:

Field Experience

Rossi, Anthony and Cassamatta, Dale Lifeline of the St. Johns: The Importance of its Tributaries

This TLO describes a 3-credit, one semester undergraduate elective course that will be team taught by A. Rossi and D. Casamatta.  The class will be divided into two phases: the initial phase (1/3 of semester) of the course will involve classroom instruction on the history, geology, economic and ecological importance of the St. Johns River to north Florida; in addition, students will learn basic sampling and statistical techniques for collecting and analyzing data for the project.  The second phase (2/3 semester) will entail a field-based commitment in which student will travel to the selected tributary and collect data for the project detailing the degree of invasive plant species (including algal diversity, which is associated with water quality) along the tributaryas well as the amount and types of human debris found in the waterway.  Students will also aid in the removal of exotic plants and debris form the tributary.  A detailed analysis will be generated (potentially for publication in a peer-reviewed journal article) and a report will be kept on record at UNF and submitted to the St. Johns River Keeper to aid in the assessment of overall water quality and health of the St. Johns River Basin.

Categories:

Service Learning
Undergraduate Research

Ross, Cliff Impacts of Environmental Stressors on Coral Reef Development

This TLO describes a 2-credit, direct independent study course that will offer undergraduate students the opportunity to gain hands on experience working with coral reef biology and physiology. Most corals have two life history stages, larvae and adult, both of which may be subject to a variety of environmental stressors (changes in light, salinity, and temperature). Surmounting evidence has shown that these stressors result in adult coral bleaching. What are less well studied are the effects of environmental stress on the vital larvae phase. If larvae do not survive and recruit to a site, adult populations will undergo a drastic reduction. The basis for this research opportunity is to work with the understudied, yet extremely important, larval phase using the coral Porites astreoides as a model system. Based upon previous research by the principle investigator, it has been determined that P. astreoides releases its larvae on the new moon of every May. This narrow window (May 24, 2009 ±3 days) dictates the timely offering of this proposed TLO (Total: 2 week duration). Days 1-10 will be designated for the field component of this project (sample collection and experimental set up). Days 11-14 will be used for laboratory analysis of the specimens at UNF (laboratory of Cliff Ross). The field component of this research will take place at Mote Marine Tropical Laboratory (http://isurus.mote.org/Keys/), a fully equipped marine science facility dedicated to marine research, education and conservation. The facility is located within easy access to a variety of coral reef habitats. UNF students will be involved in all aspects of this project including adult coral collection, larvae maintenance, experimental setup, and data collection and analysis.

Categories:

Undergraduate Research

Schnusenberg, Oliver International Business Club and Finance and Investment Society International Field Trip to Washington

The purpose of this TLO is to combine the learning experience of two student organizations, the Finance and Investment Society and the International Business Club, in the Coggin College of Business. During this five-day experience, students will be exposed to various aspects of international business and finance. Visiting Washington, DC by itself is a transformational experience for students. However, the planned visits are structured to allow students to obtain a better understanding of how government, semi-private, and private agencies facilitate international business and, in particular, international finance. The recent focus on increased regulation and the need for ethics renders this trip unique in that students will experience first-hand how international transactions are regulated and what the government’s view is with regard to regulation. The various agencies that are part of this trip are: International Monetary Fund, World Bank, International Finance Corporation, Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency, and United Nations.

Categories:

Field Experience

Vasana, Susan Medical Signal Classification in Collaboration with Mayo Clinic for Undergraduate Research

At the request of the Liver Transplant Center at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, our electrical engineering students are working to help record the Electrocardiogram (ECG) and Arterial Blood Pressure (ABP) monitoring signals. A wide range of patient samples are being collected for the research and analysis of the medical signals in this project. We have a total of eight students in UNF who have been actively involved in this project. The students are analyzing and modeling the ABP and ECG signal waveforms from the samples with varying degrees of health and age, and are developing classification criteria that will have some forms of signal identification features. The ultimate goal of the research project is to provide a benchmark in diagnosis of patient cardiac and arterial conditions using ABP and ECG monitoring signals.

This TLO project is divided by semester long tasks. Each student will sign up for three credit hours of individual study course, and will write term reports based on the research discoveries. We will need to travel to attend the international conferences to exchange the current knowledge and publish our research results. In summer 2007, there are two papers from this research which were published in international conferences where the faculty authors presented the papers. Our students in the research group will benefit from attending the conferences and presenting their research results. The travel period to the conference is usually 3-5 days. This TLO proposal seeks funding for this purpose.

Categories:

Undergraduate Research

Vergenz, Robert Presentations to International Sanibel Symposium on Quantum Biochemistry

In my lab I presently mentor ten undergraduate research students. Seven of these are working on projects as part of our team’s protein structure track. I propose that six research students and myself will present our projects at an upcoming international conference. The most appropriate and economical professional forum for this research is the annual international Sanibel Symposium on Quantum Chemistry at St. Simons Island, GA, February, 2009 . The conference is organized such that biennially (in odd numbered years) the emphasis is on quantum biochemistry, the subject of much of our team research. Because of the infrequency of the meetings, this will be the only opportunity for this conference during the terms of several of these students. The present cohort of students has been working on their projects for five, 18, 10, 4, 5, 5, and 2 months, respectively. It is probable that others will also begin work on this between now and the conference. Students will be chosen to travel and present based primarily on the readiness of their work as the time of the conference approaches, and secondarily on whether they have yet had such an opportunity on my team. The project involves computer simulations which model the forces responsible for folding of biomedically significant protein structures. At this time, three manuscripts are in progress from this group to be submitted to peer-reviewed scientific journals.

Categories:

Undergraduate Research

   
Directed Independent Study
Faculty/Staff Leader Nature of the Experience
Robinson, Tim Study Abroad Scholarships

Study Abroad Scholarships for individual student applications.  Funds for these scholarships will be used by individual students for the international study activity of their own choosing (must be credit bearing, with 3 credits minimum required). Students will be required to identify the particular study abroad activity they will use the funds for. If a scholarship recipient does not participate in the identified study abroad activity, he/she will be required to return the scholarship funds.  NOTE:  PRIORITY WILL BE GIVEN TO STUDENTS APPLYING FOR A UNF EXCHANGE PROGRAM, A UNF-CONNECTED PROGRAM, AND/OR ANY OTHER PROGRAM THAT HAS A FORMAL RELATIONSHIP WITH UNF.  OTHER PROGRAMS MAY BE SUPPORTED, ON A FUNDS-AVAILABLE BASIS, IF APPROVED BY THE UNF INTERNATIONAL CENTER AND BY UNF ACADEMIC ADVISORS FOR CREDIT TRANSFER.   The programs allowed for these scholarships will vary in length from 3 weeks to a full semester (most will probably be semester in length based on 2007-2008 experience). Scholarships are anticipated to be in two categories:  short term ($500) and long term ($1,000).  The former would be for a summer or shorter study abroad activity (10 awards); the latter for a semester or longer study activity (20 awards).

Steagall, Jeff Semester Study Abroad Scholarship for Business Students

The proposed TLO funding would partially support fifteen Coggin College of Business undergraduate business majors studying abroad for a period of one semester or longer. A typical semester is approximately 16 weeks, although there is variation in both directions depending on the host institution and country. The TLO scholarship will be $1500 per student, and will help defray travel and lodging expenses. Coggin offers approximately twenty semester exchange opportunities at partner institutions worldwide, and several more will be added during 2007-8. The TLO funding could be used toward any of these programs. One advantage of exchange programs is that the cost to students is minimized, since the partners do not charge tuition or fees for our students. Semester study abroad is recognized as one of the most transformative experiences that a student can have. Both the length of the stay abroad and the “otherness” that it entails contribute to the level of student transformation. Living and studying in a foreign location for a four-month period forces the student to learn to deal with new and difficult situations, to overcome homesickness, to begin learning a new language or improve their existing foreign language skills, to live in a foreign culture and have time to begin to appreciate it, to begin to question their own cultural biases and perspectives, etc.

Zeiser, Pamela Long-Term Study Abroad Support for International Studies Majors

All students majoring in International Studies must complete an international educational experience as a requirement for graduation.  The major requires coursework in the fields of anthropology, economics, geography, history, and political science, all of which prepare students for international experiences.  Many students participate in short-term, UNF faculty-led study abroad programs and can thus benefit from TLO funding.  Increasingly, however, International Studies majors are considering semester- or year-long study abroad programs but find the costs prohibitive.  This TLO would provide $1,500 travel scholarships for each International Studies major enrolling in a semester- or year-long study abroad program.  Students will choose the programs best-suited to their individual academic needs and interests, though all will be approved by UNF’s International Center to qualify for funding. 

Study abroad in any form is transformational for students.  They can experience other cultures and customs, understand global issues and events from other perspectives, gain a new perspective on and appreciation for their own country, and gain self-confidence and independence.  In the era of globalization, such experience is important to all students.  We all need to be global citizens and better prepared to compete in the global economy.  For students majoring in International Studies, such a transformational experience is vital.  These are students planning on careers in the foreign service, international business, US government agencies, international organizations, and education.

Borg, Mary Public Policy Internship Initiative

I would like UNF to become a national leader in providing real world experiences to our students. Internships will be offered for varying amounts of time ranging from one to two months during the summer to a full semester. Potential internship sites include:


Locally:  Mayor's office, US Congressional local offices, State Representatives’ local offices, ACLU, FBI, local businesses, political campaigns, Florida Times Union, local television and radio stations.
State:  Governor’s internship program, State Representatives’ Tallahassee offices, State agencies.
Washington, DC:  Washington Center internships, State Department, International Embassies, Congress, Government Agencies  National Democratic Institute, National Republican Institute, US Institute of Peace, The Brookings Institution, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Woodrow Wilson Center, Stimson Center, National Endowment for Democracy, Refugees International, International Crisis Group.
New York City:  International Refugee Committee, Human Rights First, Concern, Lawyers Committee, International Crisis Group, Security Council Watch, International Center for Transitional Justice, Center for Cooperation at NYU, ABC, NBC, CBS, and CNN.


Internships are transformational in a number of ways.  They provide students with first-hand knowledge of career opportunities in their chosen discipline.  They allow students to build practical skills and apply their discipline-specific knowledge to real world situations. They provide valuable work experience and contacts that will benefit them when they are looking for jobs after graduation.  They help students build their confidence as they realize that they can compete in the world of work.  In addition, the opportunity to live in a major US city or in another country for two months is one of the biggest advantages for some of our students who may never have left home before.

   
Field Experience
Faculty/Staff Leader Nature of the Experience
Lupi, Marsha International Short-term Internships in Plymouth, England

The funding requested in this proposal will assist COEHS student teaching interns in applying for the invaluable experience of practice teaching, learning and living in another country. A selected group of students who academically qualify and are recommended for this experience, will travel to Plymouth, England where they will participate in a daily teaching internship for three weeks in either an elementary, special education or secondary education classroom. Participating schools have been selected that offer comprehensive K-12 programs and a dedication to making this an excellent learning situation for UNF students. This proposal expands previous student teaching internship opportunities to include secondary education placements.


The international internship experience will serve as a culminating activity to the required fourteen week internship semester in Jacksonville.  Students will be required to participate in all aspects of the school day and week for the three week period. They will have the unique opportunity to meet weekly with the head teacher (Principal) of each school to engage in discussions about the curriculum and organization of the British school system. They will also be attending a weekly seminar with UNF faculty and using the campus resources including faculty members, provided to them by their mentors at the host university where they will reside in Plymouth, The College of St. Mark and St. John (Marjon).

Bowman, Ray St. Johns River TLO

Students will prepare for a spring immersion experience on the St. Johns River by working with faculty mentors in their respective major disciplines during the previous fall semester and by reading the book “River of Lakes” by Bill Belleville.  Each student will design a project to be executed on the river 2008-09, most probably during Spring Break, 2009.  The faculty mentor will be responsible for guiding the development of a project worthy of one academic credit (to be awarded at the conclusion of the spring 2009 term) and will hold the student mentee accountable for completion of the project.  A final “deliverable” will be required as appropriate for the discipline, for example a scientific report, a completed series of paintings, a term paper, etc.  The students will be on a houseboat for 8 ½ continuous days primarily in the middle portion of the St. Johns River.  They will visit state parks, springs, tributaries, and other points of natural significance and interact with authors, historians, scientists, engineers, artists, and musicians about the river and its people. 


An important feature of the student-designed projects is that they must be shared with the other students on the trip, a Project-Based Educational (PBE) approach.  Time will be scheduled during the trip for the students to peer teach and after the trip to report the results of their project to the whole group.  Further, the group as a whole will choose and execute a group project such as a video program, a group manuscript based on a log of trip events, etc.

Harwood, Paul Campaign 2008: The Political Engagement of America's Youth

This TLO will give every UNF student the opportunity to participate. Its objective is simple- to teach students the importance of political and civic engagement. One of the primary causes of low political and social capital among today’s youth is their perception of alienation from the political process. In short, the issues that dominate the U.S. policy (prescription drugs, homestead exemptions etc.) are remote from the concerns of college students. This TLO allows the issues which concern college students- America’s youth- to be heard and illustrate the necessity to our students to be responsible, civically engagement citizens. This objective will be achieved via several means. First, every UNF student will have the opportunity to pose a question for inclusion on a national telephone survey of American adults. The survey will exclusively be on the issues that concern our students. Second, some 350+ students, from a variety of classes across campus will be involved in collecting this survey, analyzing the generated data and putting together public relations materials to disseminate the survey’s results to the national media. Third, 35-40 students will be enrolled in a special topics 3000 level POS course entitled Political and Civic Engagement: Polling the Public. This course (with open enrollment, rather than exclusively for political science majors) will explore 1) in a traditional classroom setting the decline of social capital and civic engagement in America. Here the works of De Tocqueville, Putnam and the like will feature. This will provide students with a theoretical grounding in civic engagement. 2) Utilizing applied in-field pedagogy Political and Civic Engagement: Polling the Public will provide a “hands-on” experience of building a survey instrument, putting a survey into the field, and disseminating its results to the news media-vital skills in an increasingly competitive job market. The survey results will highlight the necessity of political participation to our entire student body.

Schnusenberg, Oliver International Business Club and Finance and Investment Society International Field Trip to Washington

The purpose of this TLO is to combine the learning experience of two student organizations, the Finance and Investment Society and the International Business Club, in the Coggin College of Business. During this five-day experience, students will be exposed to various aspects of international business and finance. Visiting Washington, DC by itself is a transformational experience for students. However, the planned visits are structured to allow students to obtain a better understanding of how government, semi-private, and private agencies facilitate international business and, in particular, international finance. The recent focus on increased regulation and the need for ethics renders this trip unique in that students will experience first-hand how international transactions are regulated and what the government’s view is with regard to regulation. The various agencies that are part of this trip are: International Monetary Fund, World Bank, International Finance Corporation, Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency, and United Nations.

   
International
Faculty/Staff Leader Nature of the Experience
Ahmed, Parvez and Horvath-Neimeyer, Paula Communicating Across Cultures: Business and Communication in the Arab and Muslim World

The goal of this TLO is to help prepare students to communicate and conduct business in a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic and otherwise diverse world. The need to provide students with knowledge about intercultural communication becomes more pressing each year as our increasing personal mobility, expanding global economy, changing demographics, and advancing mass communication technology bind the world even closer. Our increased contact with other cultures makes it imperative that we make an effort to understand people who may be very different from us.  Both the increasing friction between the United States and other countries around the world and the increasing tide of globalization heightens that imperative.  This TLO will focus on one of the most critical regions today – the Middle East. 

This proposal is for establishing a new model for transformative learning. The proposal combines three elements – inter-disciplinary learning, cross-cultural collaboration and study abroad. The entire experience will be for 6 credit hours and students will be required to sign up for the entire 6 credit hours. In the classroom, students will examine economic, cultural, historical, social, political and religious issues in the Middle East.  They will explore cultural themes and patterns, business conduct and characteristics, and emerging trends.  Outside the classroom, they will engage in a process of understanding “the other” on a first-hand basis in an attempt to both build bridges between the Middle East and the United States and establish a clear path to international business success.

Christie, Cathy and Rodriguez, Judy A TLO in Belize for Undergraduate Nutrition Students

This proposal is a request to partially support a study abroad program to the country of Belize, each of which is heavily populated by one of the four cultural groups found within the Belizean populace. The proposed transformational learning experience involves a two-week study abroad course to the Central American country of Belize for 16 undergraduate students (along with 4 graduate students) from the Brooks College of Health. The students will be accompanied by three UNF faculty, Drs. Rodriguez, Christie, and Watkins during late spring (May), 2008.  The 16 students will be divided into teams of 4 persons and each team will be overseen by one faculty person and a graduate student. Dr. Rodriguez will guide all teams activities related to community assessments, cultural food habits, multicultural counseling skill development, and cultural competency training. Drs. Catherine Christie and Watkins, along with a graduate student, will oversee the teams’ inpatient and public health service activities, respectively. This includes, for Dr. Christie, student experiences related to working with Belizeans on nutrition assessment, nutrition diagnosis, medical nutrition management and relationship of diet to disease outcomes. For Dr. Julia Watkins, this will involve guiding students in helping the graduate student’s community based or research project.

Cox, Daniel Cultural Enrichment for Engineering Students while Performing Research in Germany

A National Science Foundation International Research in Engineering Education (NSF IREE) has been awarded to the PI, Daniel Cox, of the NSF sponsored “Florida’s First Coast Manufacturing Innovation Partnership” (MIP) Program in the School of Engineering at UNF. The NSF IREE supports technical exchange between UNF and the Cologne University of Applied Science (CUAS) in Cologne Germany. This is a technical research grant that also has the goals of developing a greater interpersonal relationship for Americans and the members of the global societies. The PI and six UNF engineering students will travel to Cologne in the summer of 2008.

While the NSF IREE provides support for the stay in Cologne, additional opportunities are pursued for expanded cultural experiences in Germany through this TLO proposal opportunity. The students will be spending time with and actively engaged with students at CUAS. This TLO provides additional opportunities for the students to become more engaged with the more citizens and culture of Germany. Germany has a wide array of cultural opportunities. The students have suggested some of these that they would like to experience. Unfortunately, the funding by NSF, while significant, will be limited mostly to support the stay in Cologne. Although Germany is large, it is easily commutable by rail and many unique cultural experiences are available by day trip. There is large number of more significant experiences available by overnight stay at the farther reaches of the country from Cologne. The TLO proposal will support an estimated six to eight additional cultural experiences over the three month period. Some will occur on the weekend while some may occur during the week on occasion either partially or in full.

Ladendorff, Marcia The Ghana Project: A Project-Based Approach to Service Learning in West Africa

The Ghana Project is based on an interdisciplinary team-taught course where students learn about West Africa and the developing world on campus for a semester, and then participate in a twenty-one day study trip to Ghana.  The specific service projects that the students participate in while in Ghana are developed based on community needs as identified by our partners in the local communities.  These needs change as the country of Ghana itself develops.  The projects create multiple learning opportunities.  At one level they teach civic engagement, at another level they challenge students to apply their learning in areas like Economics and Nursing to real-world (real developing world) issues.  At yet another level the projects require students to work closely with local people, challenging them to communicate across cultural barriers.

In 2009, we plan to present new and different projects to our students.  We will move the health and political projects to a new part of the country (the Volta Region) as we have done as much as we are capable for these projects in the North.  Nursing students will work in a hospital setting and the rest of the students will collaborate with the civic union serving this area.  The civic union has asked us to help them conduct public opinion surveys similar to the surveys we conducted with the West Mamprusi District in 2005 and 2007.  Engineering students have expressed an interest in carrying out a re-design of the water drainage infrastructure for the Tamale Children’s Home in the North.  A number of senior engineering students are creating an analysis and plan for this re-design for their senior design project.  The idea is to take that re-design and execute it during our trip in 2009.  We would partner with Ghanaian construction workers through an NGO.  Either engineering faculty or the engineering mentor for the senior design students would accompany us on this trip to provide expert supervision of the project.

Lupi, Marsha International Short-term Internships in Plymouth, England

The funding requested in this proposal will assist COEHS student teaching interns in applying for the invaluable experience of practice teaching, learning and living in another country. A selected group of students who academically qualify and are recommended for this experience, will travel to Plymouth, England where they will participate in a daily teaching internship for three weeks in either an elementary, special education or secondary education classroom. Participating schools have been selected that offer comprehensive K-12 programs and a dedication to making this an excellent learning situation for UNF students. This proposal expands previous student teaching internship opportunities to include secondary education placements.


The international internship experience will serve as a culminating activity to the required fourteen week internship semester in Jacksonville.  Students will be required to participate in all aspects of the school day and week for the three week period. They will have the unique opportunity to meet weekly with the head teacher (Principal) of each school to engage in discussions about the curriculum and organization of the British school system. They will also be attending a weekly seminar with UNF faculty and using the campus resources including faculty members, provided to them by their mentors at the host university where they will reside in Plymouth, The College of St. Mark and St. John (Marjon).

McMahan, Carolynn International Advertising and Broadcasting: Experiential Study Abroad to Taiwan, China, Hong Kong

The proposed teaching and learning opportunity for which funding is requested is an experiential study abroad course to expose students to the facets of international communication, specifically advertising and broadcasting, within three dynamic and contrasting markets in Asia, Taiwan, China and Hong Kong. This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand the challenges and barriers to international advertising within the Asian market, such as the legal and regulatory aspects in regards to media and the cultural differences in regards to consumer behavior. Students will examine the industry, culture, and societal issues in order to gain an understanding of how to effectively communicate to consumers within these differing Asian markets. Students will also have the opportunity to attend classes and interact with international students and faculty from two Asian universities, specifically Tatung University and Renmin University. 

This study abroad program would be a common boundary course, combining two new courses, International Advertising and International Broadcast/ Journalism. Students would initially work on real case studies and projects developed by the multinational corporations within the host countries due to established relationships with Frank Koch, Marketing Director, Proctor and Gamble in Taiwan; and Malcolm Sullivan, Vice President of Marketing in Asia for Federal Express. These connections with multinational corporations were established on a site visit to Taipei, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, funded by an International grant and the Communication department.

Students, working in groups, would be assigned a case study from one of the multinational corporations. Initially students would work on the project by conducting secondary research into the host country’s business environment including cultural, political, technological and regulatory factors. Students would then travel to Asia for two weeks to interact with company executives and their advertising agencies, meet with media organizations, while also interacting with students and faculty at Tatung University and Renmin University to further work together on finalizing the projects. Tatung University has agreed to partner with UNF and provide on-campus housing in Taiwan and Renmin University has committed to meet with students and arrange for tours and meetings with both students and faculty. As for the media organizations, due to connections with China Central Television (CCTV) and leading television institutions in Beijing, such as Beijing TV (BTV), students will visit these facilities and meet with media executives. CCTV is the official broadcaster of the Olympics Games and BTV is the largest broadcaster in the Beijing area.

Robinson, Tim Study Abroad Scholarships

Study Abroad Scholarships for individual student applications.  Funds for these scholarships will be used by individual students for the international study activity of their own choosing (must be credit bearing, with 3 credits minimum required). Students will be required to identify the particular study abroad activity they will use the funds for. If a scholarship recipient does not participate in the identified study abroad activity, he/she will be required to return the scholarship funds.  NOTE:  PRIORITY WILL BE GIVEN TO STUDENTS APPLYING FOR A UNF EXCHANGE PROGRAM, A UNF-CONNECTED PROGRAM, AND/OR ANY OTHER PROGRAM THAT HAS A FORMAL RELATIONSHIP WITH UNF.  OTHER PROGRAMS MAY BE SUPPORTED, ON A FUNDS-AVAILABLE BASIS, IF APPROVED BY THE UNF INTERNATIONAL CENTER AND BY UNF ACADEMIC ADVISORS FOR CREDIT TRANSFER.   The programs allowed for these scholarships will vary in length from 3 weeks to a full semester (most will probably be semester in length based on 2007-2008 experience). Scholarships are anticipated to be in two categories:  short term ($500) and long term ($1,000).  The former would be for a summer or shorter study abroad activity (10 awards); the latter for a semester or longer study activity (20 awards).

Schwam-Baird, Shira French Language Study Abroad Program in Strasbourg, France

The proposed program is the Strasbourg French language and culture study abroad program already in existence. The program consists of four weeks in Strasbourg, France during which the UNF students learn French fifteen hours a week (total of 45 official contact hours) in a language school where native speakers teach the classes entirely in French—no English whatsoever—and their classmates come from all over the world. Moreover, they live with French families with whom they take two meals a day, so their immersion experience continues outside the classroom and real cultural contact fills the greater part of most days.

As faculty leader, I teach a culture class (Faces of France) three afternoons a week and conduct their many excursions—short afternoon visits to places of interest in the city, full-day Saturday excursions in the region around Strasbourg, and a long weekend in Paris (total 75-80 contact hours with excursions). An example of a full-day Saturday excursion: a visit to the only Nazi-era concentration camp on French soil, Struthof, a picnic at a castle ruin, a visit to a restored castle, and a tour of a small Alsatian village. Afternoon excursions in Strasbourg include visits to two important European institutions, the European Parliament and the European Council (both seated in Strasbourg), the Strasbourg cathedral, and other churches and museums in the city. The weekend in Paris focuses on both history and art, but also imparts the sense of Paris as a vibrant city where people live and work, not just a massive museum for the world’s tourists.

Steagall, Jeff Semester Study Abroad Scholarship for Business Students

The proposed TLO funding would partially support fifteen Coggin College of Business undergraduate business majors studying abroad for a period of one semester or longer. A typical semester is approximately 16 weeks, although there is variation in both directions depending on the host institution and country. The TLO scholarship will be $1500 per student, and will help defray travel and lodging expenses. Coggin offers approximately twenty semester exchange opportunities at partner institutions worldwide, and several more will be added during 2007-8. The TLO funding could be used toward any of these programs. One advantage of exchange programs is that the cost to students is minimized, since the partners do not charge tuition or fees for our students. Semester study abroad is recognized as one of the most transformative experiences that a student can have. Both the length of the stay abroad and the “otherness” that it entails contribute to the level of student transformation. Living and studying in a foreign location for a four-month period forces the student to learn to deal with new and difficult situations, to overcome homesickness, to begin learning a new language or improve their existing foreign language skills, to live in a foreign culture and have time to begin to appreciate it, to begin to question their own cultural biases and perspectives, etc.

Shaw, Sherry Undergraduate Study Abroad and Mentored Interpretation Research

This proposal presents the opportunity for UNF’s students of American Sign Language/English Interpreting to study abroad for 20 days at two renowned institutions in the field of translation/interpretation studies: The Karl-Franzens-University of Graz and the University of Vienna, Austria. Students will also travel to Slovenia for a view of working spoken language translators/interpreters. Students will attend translation and interpreting classes with the local students in Graz and Vienna who have English as one of their three working languages. They will participate in Austrian Sign Language classes, which are taught without voice, and will interact with Austrian Deaf instructors for a rich cultural immersion into a visual language that is very different from American Sign Language. Students will be enrolled in Applied Research in Interpretation and spend time discussing their research designs with interpretation research faculty at both institutions, Dr. Franz Höchpacker and Mag. Nadja Grbic (both extensively internationally published in the field). Students will work on literature reviews in the Institute of Theoretical and Applied Translation Studies’(Graz) vast translation library, accessing all the journals published in the interpretation discipline. A translation and interpretation agency (called Translat) in Maribor, Slovenia will host the students for a weekend at a countryside lodge and provide a seminar on “Applying Interpretation Theory to the Real World of Translation and Interpretation.” Students will tour the historic town with the owner of Translat as their personal guide.

Zeiser, Pamela Long-Term Study Abroad Support for International Studies Majors

All students majoring in International Studies must complete an international educational experience as a requirement for graduation.  The major requires coursework in the fields of anthropology, economics, geography, history, and political science, all of which prepare students for international experiences.  Many students participate in short-term, UNF faculty-led study abroad programs and can thus benefit from TLO funding.  Increasingly, however, International Studies majors are considering semester- or year-long study abroad programs but find the costs prohibitive.  This TLO would provide $1,500 travel scholarships for each International Studies major enrolling in a semester- or year-long study abroad program.  Students will choose the programs best-suited to their individual academic needs and interests, though all will be approved by UNF’s International Center to qualify for funding. 

Study abroad in any form is transformational for students.  They can experience other cultures and customs, understand global issues and events from other perspectives, gain a new perspective on and appreciation for their own country, and gain self-confidence and independence.  In the era of globalization, such experience is important to all students.  We all need to be global citizens and better prepared to compete in the global economy.  For students majoring in International Studies, such a transformational experience is vital.  These are students planning on careers in the foreign service, international business, US government agencies, international organizations, and education.

Zhao, Mei and Haley, Rob Health Care and Culture in China: The Qingdao Experience

Financial support is being requested for students to participate in a study abroad enrichment program focusing on China’s healthcare system.  This program will be developed in collaboration with Qingdao University’s College of Medical Science.  Qingdao is located in China’s Shandong Province and is China’s fourth largest manufacturing port.  As a result, its healthcare system is challenged as it serves individuals of different nationalities, cultures, and socioeconomic status.  Each student is expected to spend at least 6 hours per day over a 6-day period comprised of in-class curriculum with Qingdao University pertaining to China’s healthcare system.  In addition, on-site visits to the Medical Care and Health Centre for Women and Children, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Qingdao Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Qingdao Haici TCM Hospital are being planned.

This course provides the opportunity for UNF students to directly interact with China’s university students who are of the similar age and professional interests but are of a different culture.  Students will understand the culture of providing healthcare in China’s Shandong Province and will gain direct experience and knowledge of students, healthcare administrators, healthcare institutions, and public health issues in Qingdao.  UNF faculty leaders will work with Qingdao University faculty to develop and administer a rigorous curriculum for UNF students.  UNF Faculty will facilitate and engage students in discussions with high-level officials to understand the challenges of a healthcare system that is characterized by a population that is 80% uninsured.  Also, the comparison of both healthcare systems will provide a unique opportunity for UNF students – the future health care leaders to better understand the health care issues that we are facing today and possible solutions in the future.

   
Service Learning
Faculty/Staff Leader Nature of the Experience
Ladendorff, Marcia The Ghana Project: A Project-Based Approach to Service Learning in West Africa

The Ghana Project is based on an interdisciplinary team-taught course where students learn about West Africa and the developing world on campus for a semester, and then participate in a twenty-one day study trip to Ghana.  The specific service projects that the students participate in while in Ghana are developed based on community needs as identified by our partners in the local communities.  These needs change as the country of Ghana itself develops.  The projects create multiple learning opportunities.  At one level they teach civic engagement, at another level they challenge students to apply their learning in areas like Economics and Nursing to real-world (real developing world) issues.  At yet another level the projects require students to work closely with local people, challenging them to communicate across cultural barriers.

In 2009, we plan to present new and different projects to our students.  We will move the health and political projects to a new part of the country (the Volta Region) as we have done as much as we are capable for these projects in the North.  Nursing students will work in a hospital setting and the rest of the students will collaborate with the civic union serving this area.  The civic union has asked us to help them conduct public opinion surveys similar to the surveys we conducted with the West Mamprusi District in 2005 and 2007.  Engineering students have expressed an interest in carrying out a re-design of the water drainage infrastructure for the Tamale Children’s Home in the North.  A number of senior engineering students are creating an analysis and plan for this re-design for their senior design project.  The idea is to take that re-design and execute it during our trip in 2009.  We would partner with Ghanaian construction workers through an NGO.  Either engineering faculty or the engineering mentor for the senior design students would accompany us on this trip to provide expert supervision of the project.

Gabbard, Chris The Exceptional Body in the Cultural Eye: Disability in Literature, Education, and Society

Two aspects characterize this Spring 2009 community-based TLO proposal. First, the TLO entails a literature course focusing on the reading and analysis of (primarily) literary texts in which disability is prominently featured. And second, it mandates volunteer work either with children with disabilities (at the Mt. Herman School or at the Developmental Learning Center) or with adults with disabilities at the Independent Living Center of Northeast Florida or at ARC Jacksonville. The students will convene for two class sessions per week to discuss assigned texts, and they will serve as volunteers for a minimum of two hours per week at Mt. Herman, the DLC, the Independent Living Center or ARC. Students will volunteer at times that accommodate both their schedules and these organizations’ needs.

Rossi, Anthony and Cassamatta, Dale Lifeline of the St. Johns: The Importance of its Tributaries

This TLO describes a 3-credit, one semester undergraduate elective course that will be team taught by A. Rossi and D. Casamatta.  The class will be divided into two phases: the initial phase (1/3 of semester) of the course will involve classroom instruction on the history, geology, economic and ecological importance of the St. Johns River to north Florida; in addition, students will learn basic sampling and statistical techniques for collecting and analyzing data for the project.  The second phase (2/3 semester) will entail a field-based commitment in which student will travel to the selected tributary and collect data for the project detailing the degree of invasive plant species (including algal diversity, which is associated with water quality) along the tributaryas well as the amount and types of human debris found in the waterway.  Students will also aid in the removal of exotic plants and debris form the tributary.  A detailed analysis will be generated (potentially for publication in a peer-reviewed journal article) and a report will be kept on record at UNF and submitted to the St. Johns River Keeper to aid in the assessment of overall water quality and health of the St. Johns River Basin.

   
Undergraduate Research
Faculty/Staff Leader Nature of the Experience
Cox, Daniel Cultural Enrichment for Engineering Students while Performing Research in Germany

A National Science Foundation International Research in Engineering Education (NSF IREE) has been awarded to the PI, Daniel Cox, of the NSF sponsored “Florida’s First Coast Manufacturing Innovation Partnership” (MIP) Program in the School of Engineering at UNF. The NSF IREE supports technical exchange between UNF and the Cologne University of Applied Science (CUAS) in Cologne Germany. This is a technical research grant that also has the goals of developing a greater interpersonal relationship for Americans and the members of the global societies. The PI and six UNF engineering students will travel to Cologne in the summer of 2008.

While the NSF IREE provides support for the stay in Cologne, additional opportunities are pursued for expanded cultural experiences in Germany through this TLO proposal opportunity. The students will be spending time with and actively engaged with students at CUAS. This TLO provides additional opportunities for the students to become more engaged with the more citizens and culture of Germany. Germany has a wide array of cultural opportunities. The students have suggested some of these that they would like to experience. Unfortunately, the funding by NSF, while significant, will be limited mostly to support the stay in Cologne. Although Germany is large, it is easily commutable by rail and many unique cultural experiences are available by day trip. There is large number of more significant experiences available by overnight stay at the farther reaches of the country from Cologne. The TLO proposal will support an estimated six to eight additional cultural experiences over the three month period. Some will occur on the weekend while some may occur during the week on occasion either partially or in full.

Shaw, Sherry Undergraduate Study Abroad and Mentored Interpretation Research

This proposal presents the opportunity for UNF’s students of American Sign Language/English Interpreting to study abroad for 20 days at two renowned institutions in the field of translation/interpretation studies: The Karl-Franzens-University of Graz and the University of Vienna, Austria. Students will also travel to Slovenia for a view of working spoken language translators/interpreters. Students will attend translation and interpreting classes with the local students in Graz and Vienna who have English as one of their three working languages. They will participate in Austrian Sign Language classes, which are taught without voice, and will interact with Austrian Deaf instructors for a rich cultural immersion into a visual language that is very different from American Sign Language. Students will be enrolled in Applied Research in Interpretation and spend time discussing their research designs with interpretation research faculty at both institutions, Dr. Franz Höchpacker and Mag. Nadja Grbic (both extensively internationally published in the field). Students will work on literature reviews in the Institute of Theoretical and Applied Translation Studies’(Graz) vast translation library, accessing all the journals published in the interpretation discipline. A translation and interpretation agency (called Translat) in Maribor, Slovenia will host the students for a weekend at a countryside lodge and provide a seminar on “Applying Interpretation Theory to the Real World of Translation and Interpretation.” Students will tour the historic town with the owner of Translat as their personal guide.

Butler, Joe A Study in Restoration of Gopher Tortoise Habitat on the UNF Campus

I studied a population of gopher tortoises living in the southwestern quadrant of the UNF campus in the early 1990s (Butler et al. 1995, Butler and Hull 1996, Butler and Sowell 1996).  At that time the habitat underwent periodic controlled burning on about a three year cycle.  These controlled burns prevented shrubs and taller trees from shading the ground, thus allowing low growing plants which tortoises eat to thrive.  The area has not been burned for over a decade and the canopy is more closed to the sun, and thick shrubs such as palmetto have taken the place of plants more useful to tortoises.  The tortoises residing in the southwestern quadrant appear to be limiting their movements to the few open canopy areas, particularly along the dirt road. I propose to select a number of sampling areas in that quadrant and open the canopy using two techniques.  The value of the techniques will be assessed by determining if more tortoises use the treated areas.  The work will be completed (as much as it can be) by a graduate student and a team of undergraduates, and it will be the basis for a Master’s thesis.  Additionally, after familiarizing themselves with the literature each undergraduate will select a project of his/her own involving the tortoises and their habitat.  Some projects which lend themselves to undergraduate study are tortoise nesting and incubation, plant diversity, feeding preferences, demographic evaluation, burrow orientation, etc.  The important issue will be that students choose their own projects.  Most projects will require assistance from the entire team.

Davies, John Media Coverage of Environmental Issues in Northeast Florida

The proposed TLO is an extension of a research-based, interdisciplinary teaching project currently being conducted by John Davies (Dept. of Communication) and Casey Welch (Dept. of Sociology). The current project is a collaborative effort between the Department of Communication and the Department of Sociology designed to enhance the opportunities for active learning among students from both disciplines. Students from two classes are currently participating in the project: SYA 4930, Media and Society, and MMC 3614 Media Theories and Effects.

In this project, students are engaging in teaching and interacting with their peers within and across disciplines. Basically, students in Sociology are reading, analyzing, and synthesizing key research about media for their counterparts in Communication. Students in Communication are using the information provided by the Sociology students to analyze and integrate media theories and concepts from their own classes with the research. Throughout the Fall 2007 semester, small groups of students from both disciplines are meeting periodically to present and discuss their findings in a panel presentation / Q & A format.


It is anticipated that approximately 10 students from both classes will participate in the proposed TLO as an opportunity to take the theories and concepts learned in the classroom and extend and apply them to address an issue facing residents in Northeast Florida. Specifically, students will conduct a three phase investigation: 1) participate in research and information gathering activities designed to identify major environmental issues specific to Northeast Florida, 2) conduct a content analysis of the local media coverage of said issues, and 3) communicate the results of their findings to the campus community, residents of Northeast Florida, and the academic community.

Rossi, Anthony and Cassamatta, Dale Lifeline of the St. Johns: The Importance of its Tributaries

This TLO describes a 3-credit, one semester undergraduate elective course that will be team taught by A. Rossi and D. Casamatta.  The class will be divided into two phases: the initial phase (1/3 of semester) of the course will involve classroom instruction on the history, geology, economic and ecological importance of the St. Johns River to north Florida; in addition, students will learn basic sampling and statistical techniques for collecting and analyzing data for the project.  The second phase (2/3 semester) will entail a field-based commitment in which student will travel to the selected tributary and collect data for the project detailing the degree of invasive plant species (including algal diversity, which is associated with water quality) along the tributaryas well as the amount and types of human debris found in the waterway.  Students will also aid in the removal of exotic plants and debris form the tributary.  A detailed analysis will be generated (potentially for publication in a peer-reviewed journal article) and a report will be kept on record at UNF and submitted to the St. Johns River Keeper to aid in the assessment of overall water quality and health of the St. Johns River Basin.

Ross, Cliff Impacts of Environmental Stressors on Coral Reef Development

This TLO describes a 2-credit, direct independent study course that will offer undergraduate students the opportunity to gain hands on experience working with coral reef biology and physiology. Most corals have two life history stages, larvae and adult, both of which may be subject to a variety of environmental stressors (changes in light, salinity, and temperature). Surmounting evidence has shown that these stressors result in adult coral bleaching. What are less well studied are the effects of environmental stress on the vital larvae phase. If larvae do not survive and recruit to a site, adult populations will undergo a drastic reduction. The basis for this research opportunity is to work with the understudied, yet extremely important, larval phase using the coral Porites astreoides as a model system. Based upon previous research by the principle investigator, it has been determined that P. astreoides releases its larvae on the new moon of every May. This narrow window (May 24, 2009 ±3 days) dictates the timely offering of this proposed TLO (Total: 2 week duration). Days 1-10 will be designated for the field component of this project (sample collection and experimental set up). Days 11-14 will be used for laboratory analysis of the specimens at UNF (laboratory of Cliff Ross). The field component of this research will take place at Mote Marine Tropical Laboratory (http://isurus.mote.org/Keys/), a fully equipped marine science facility dedicated to marine research, education and conservation. The facility is located within easy access to a variety of coral reef habitats. UNF students will be involved in all aspects of this project including adult coral collection, larvae maintenance, experimental setup, and data collection and analysis.

Vasana, Susan Medical Signal Classification in Collaboration with Mayo Clinic for Undergraduate Research

At the request of the Liver Transplant Center at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, our electrical engineering students are working to help record the Electrocardiogram (ECG) and Arterial Blood Pressure (ABP) monitoring signals. A wide range of patient samples are being collected for the research and analysis of the medical signals in this project. We have a total of eight students in UNF who have been actively involved in this project. The students are analyzing and modeling the ABP and ECG signal waveforms from the samples with varying degrees of health and age, and are developing classification criteria that will have some forms of signal identification features. The ultimate goal of the research project is to provide a benchmark in diagnosis of patient cardiac and arterial conditions using ABP and ECG monitoring signals.

This TLO project is divided by semester long tasks. Each student will sign up for three credit hours of individual study course, and will write term reports based on the research discoveries. We will need to travel to attend the international conferences to exchange the current knowledge and publish our research results. In summer 2007, there are two papers from this research which were published in international conferences where the faculty authors presented the papers. Our students in the research group will benefit from attending the conferences and presenting their research results. The travel period to the conference is usually 3-5 days. This TLO proposal seeks funding for this purpose.

Vergenz, Robert Presentations to International Sanibel Symposium on Quantum Biochemistry

In my lab I presently mentor ten undergraduate research students. Seven of these are working on projects as part of our team’s protein structure track. I propose that six research students and myself will present our projects at an upcoming international conference. The most appropriate and economical professional forum for this research is the annual international Sanibel Symposium on Quantum Chemistry at St. Simons Island, GA, February, 2009 . The conference is organized such that biennially (in odd numbered years) the emphasis is on quantum biochemistry, the subject of much of our team research. Because of the infrequency of the meetings, this will be the only opportunity for this conference during the terms of several of these students. The present cohort of students has been working on their projects for five, 18, 10, 4, 5, 5, and 2 months, respectively. It is probable that others will also begin work on this between now and the conference. Students will be chosen to travel and present based primarily on the readiness of their work as the time of the conference approaches, and secondarily on whether they have yet had such an opportunity on my team. The project involves computer simulations which model the forces responsible for folding of biomedically significant protein structures. At this time, three manuscripts are in progress from this group to be submitted to peer-reviewed scientific journals.