December 2008 / January 2009

Around Campus
UNF Sport Management and others help Girls on the Run

UNF Sport Management and others help Girls on the RunIn the model of community-based transformational learning, representatives from the entire campus community are collaborating on a unique project to help pre-teen girls develop self-respect and a healthy lifestyle through running.

The project involves a partnership with Girls on the Run of Northeast Florida, a non-profit dedicated to educating and preparing girls for a lifetime of self-respect and healthy living. Faculty and students from the Sport Management program, along with staff from across campus, are dedicating countless hours in preparation for the organization’s WonderGirl 5K, which will take place Saturday, Dec. 13, on the UNF track. More than 500 girls and 500 running buddies are expected to participate in the run, which will begin at the track, loop around part of the UNF campus and end up back at the track.

The College of Educations and Human Services’ Sport Management program is known for its strong partnerships with the Jacksonville community and the region’s sport organizations. These connections provide students completing the program with a minimum of 420 hours of hands-on, real-world experience as well as established professional relationships. This collaborative approach provides win-win scenarios for both students and the community.

“Sport is an important vehicle for bringing about community change ... and it’s important for our students to be actively involved in the sport organizations in the community,” said Dr. Jennifer Kane, associate professor and program coordinator for Sport Management. “There is such a richness that is added to the curriculum when students are able to take what we are teaching and apply it into a sport organization. We want our curriculum to reflect that practice.”

UNF folks are involved in the WonderGirl 5K in various capacities, according to Kane. “The track and field coach [Mark VanAlstyne] has helped set up the course, other UNF employees have worked on the facility logistics, Dr. Lucy Croft [assistant vice president for Student Affairs] secured the UNF site, and my Intro to Sport Marketing class is volunteering the day of the race in various capacities, along with other students they have recruited to be running buddies,” she said.

In addition to VanAlstyne, Croft and Kane, other UNF people involved in putting on the WonderGirl 5K include: Julie Stackhouse – assistant track coach; Shelly Purser – director of Health Promotion; Becky Purser – director of Campus Recreation; Michelle Bronner – director of Academic Support Services for Athletics-University Compliance; Lauriane Byll-Cataria – director of the Student Government Volunteer Center; and Sarah Dufresne – assistant director Media Relations and Events.

“Partnering with Girls on the Run of Northeast Florida to present the inaugural WonderGirl 5K is a great opportunity to support community initiatives, encourage transformational learning experiences for all age levels and expose the community to the new track facilities and campus environment,” Croft said. “Additionally, it is a great way to build community relations and provide volunteer opportunities for our UNF students, faculty and staff.”

Sport Management students secured donations for goody bags and stuffed the bags, which will be given to the runners; solicited sponsorship donations, in-kind gifts and food, and donations for T-shirts for all running buddies; recruited and handled communication with running buddies; and signed up to volunteer as running buddies themselves.

Kane said no matter what area of sport management students end up in — professional, collegiate, community, etc. — they will benefit from having experience organizing an event like the WonderGirl 5K.

“Planning, marketing, [obtaining] sponsorships, volunteer recruitment, and logistics of running an event are valuable skill sets that we can discuss in class, but until you actually engage in the actual process, you can’t fully appreciate and understand it,” she said. 

Around Campus
The gift of entertainment

The only gift that deserves a standing ovation! UNF Fine Arts CenterFine Arts Center offers 50 percent discount to faculty/staff in December

 

In the model of community-based transformational learning, representatives from the entire campus community are collaborating on a unique project to help pre-teen girls develop self-respect and a healthy lifestyle through running.

The project involves a partnership with Girls on the Run of Northeast Florida, a non-profit dedicated to educating and preparing girls for a lifetime of self-respect and healthy living. Faculty and students from the Sport Management program, along with staff from across campus, are dedicating countless hours in preparation for the organization’s WonderGirl 5K, which will take place Saturday, Dec. 13, on the UNF track. More than 500 girls and 500 running buddies are expected to participate in the run, which will begin at the track, loop around part of the UNF campus and end up back at the track.

The College of Educations and Human Services’ Sport Management program is known for its strong partnerships with the Jacksonville community and the region’s sport organizations. These connections provide students completing the program with a minimum of 420 hours of hands-on, real-world experience as well as established professional relationships. This collaborative approach provides win-win scenarios for both students and the community.

“Sport is an important vehicle for bringing about community change ... and it’s important for our students to be actively involved in the sport organizations in the community,” said Dr. Jennifer Kane, associate professor and program coordinator for Sport Management. “There is such a richness that is added to the curriculum when students are able to take what we are teaching and apply it into a sport organization. We want our curriculum to reflect that practice.”

UNF folks are involved in the WonderGirl 5K in various capacities, according to Kane. “The track and field coach [Mark VanAlstyne] has helped set up the course, other UNF employees have worked on the facility logistics, Dr. Lucy Croft [assistant vice president for Student Affairs] secured the UNF site, and my Intro to Sport Marketing class is volunteering the day of the race in various capacities, along with other students they have recruited to be running buddies,” she said.

In addition to VanAlstyne, Croft and Kane, other UNF people involved in putting on the WonderGirl 5K include: Julie Stackhouse – assistant track coach; Shelly Purser – director of Health Promotion; Becky Purser – director of Campus Recreation; Michelle Bronner – director of Academic Support Services for Athletics-University Compliance; Lauriane Byll-Cataria – director of the Student Government Volunteer Center; and Sarah Dufresne – assistant director Media Relations and Events.

“Partnering with Girls on the Run of Northeast Florida to present the inaugural WonderGirl 5K is a great opportunity to support community initiatives, encourage transformational learning experiences for all age levels and expose the community to the new track facilities and campus environment,” Croft said. “Additionally, it is a great way to build community relations and provide volunteer opportunities for our UNF students, faculty and staff.”

Sport Management students secured donations for goody bags and stuffed the bags, which will be given to the runners; solicited sponsorship donations, in-kind gifts and food, and donations for T-shirts for all running buddies; recruited and handled communication with running buddies; and signed up to volunteer as running buddies themselves.

Kane said no matter what area of sport management students end up in — professional, collegiate, community, etc. — they will benefit from having experience organizing an event like the WonderGirl 5K.

“Planning, marketing, [obtaining] sponsorships, volunteer recruitment, and logistics of running an event are valuable skill sets that we can discuss in class, but until you actually engage in the actual process, you can’t fully appreciate and understand it,” she said. 

Around Campus
IPTM Director receives International Highway Safety Award

IPTM Director Bob Jacob holds his J. Stannard Baker AwardL. R. “Bob” Jacob, director of UNF’s Institute of Police Technology and Management (IPTM), recently received the prestigious J. Stannard Baker Award recognizing his lifetime achievement in the field of traffic safety.

Jacob was recognized for his 35 years of work as an innovator and a leader in highway safety at both the state and national levels during a November ceremony at the annual conference of the International Association of Chiefs of Police in San Diego.

“I am deeply honored to have had the opportunity to work on so many programs and with so many dedicated professionals over the years,” Jacob said. “This award really means a lot to me.”

The J. Stannard Baker Award annually recognizes individual lifetime contributions to highway safety. Law enforcement officers of state, county or municipal agencies as well as private and public sector representatives are selected for their sustained, continuous, career-spanning and innovative contributions to highway safety.

The award recipient is selected by the Highway Safety Committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and is presented in collaboration with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Northwestern University’s Center for Public Policy.

Jacob’s work in traffic safety began in 1973, when he became a trooper and later an academy instructor with the Virginia State Police. There he had an opportunity to use some of the earliest versions of traffic enforcement equipment at a time when the skyrocketing number of highway deaths was gaining national attention.

In 1984, he moved to Jacksonville, became an instructor at IPTM and, over the next 20 years, trained thousands of law enforcement officers from across the United States and several foreign countries in a variety of traffic safety topics. Jacob was appointed director of IPTM in 2005, remaining heavily involved in highway safety programs/training and makes it a priority to mentor today’s young professionals into traffic safety leaders of tomorrow.

The award honors the late J. Stannard Baker who made significant contributions to highway safety as the director of Research and Development at the Northwestern University Traffic Institute—now the Center for Public Safety—for more than 30 years. Known as the “father of accident investigation,” Baker focused on the causes of traffic crashes and helped develop modern techniques of collision investigation and reconstruction.

IPTM was established at UNF in 1980 for the purpose of providing quality and professional training programs to municipal, county, state and federal law enforcement officers. Each year, approximately 15,000 civilian and military law enforcement personnel from around the world are trained at the Institute.

IPTM offers a wide variety of courses in several fields of interest, including crash investigations and reconstruction, traffic and DUI/DWI enforcement, supervision and management, crime scene procedures, criminal investigations, drug and gang enforcement, tactical operations and more.  

Briefs
Spirit Advisory Board Partners with Interfaith Center for 2nd Annual Religious Awareness Week

Spirit Advisory Board members (from left to right) Pete Morgan, Charlene Santiago, Yvette Kibwika, Alan Marsh and Elliot Darkatsh show off a freshly painted talon print near the UNF Aquatic CenterMembers of UNF’s Spirit Advisory Board have some novel ideas for changing the perception of those who think of UNF as a commuter school lacking tradition and school spirit. The board has started to implement plans that include everything from Spirit Spotters on Blue/Gray Fridays to talon prints on sidewalks all over campus as a “game-walk” to the Arena.

Last year, about 30 Osprey talon prints were painted on the sidewalk next to the parking garage across from the Arena. The talon prints are fashioned after the paw prints the Jacksonville Jaguars have on Bay Street leading to Jacksonville Municipal Stadium.

This year the Spirit Advisory Board partnered with the Interfaith Center as part of the 2nd Annual Religious Awareness Week to work on extending the talon prints from North Parking Lot 18 to the Aquatic Center. Once the base prints are complete, UNF clubs and organizations will be able to “adopt” a talon print area and decorate it according to their affiliation as part of Homecoming week. Eventually the main walkways on campus will be named and branded after UNF traditions (i.e. “Talon Trail”, “Osprey Way”, etc.)

The board members’ primary function is to come up with ideas to promote school spirit and pride, which in turn could develop into UNF traditions.

“As we are bucking the image of a commuter school and becoming more of a traditional state university, it is crucial that as a campus community we stay connected,” said Elliot Darkatsh, director of marketing for UNF Athletics and an adviser for the Spirit Advisory Board. “Traditions and school pride are what a student will remember upon graduation. This Advisory Board is challenging the apathy bug and providing avenues for traditions to develop.”

The idea for a Spirit Advisory Board came from the 2006/07 LeadershipUNF class. Faculty, staff, students and alumni are welcome to join the Spirit Advisory Board. The board’s next meeting is at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28, in Alumni Hall.  

Briefs
28th Annual MLK Jr. Scholarship Luncheon

Dr. Benjamin Solomon Carson Sr. The Intercultural Center for PEACE will present the 28th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship Luncheon from 11:30 to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, in the University Center’s Banquet Hall. This year’s speaker, Dr. Benjamin Solomon Carson Sr., will advise listeners to “Take the risk – a rational approach to taking risks.”

Carson, a full professor of neurosurgery, oncology, plastic surgery and pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, was named by CNN and TIME Magazine as one of the nation’s 20 foremost physicians and scientists and he was selected by the Library of Congress as one of 89 “Living Legends” on the occasion of its 200th anniversary.

Tickets for the luncheon are available online at http://capricorn.anf.unf.edu/unftbo3/shopdisplaycategories.asp or at the UNF Ticket Box Office at ext. 2878. Free tickets are also available to 100 UNF students with ID (on a first-come, first-served basis). Tickets are $30 for individuals; $500 for silver-level corporate tables (including a table for eight and table signage); $1,000 for gold-level corporate tables (including a table for eight, table signage, preferred seating, recognition in the program and a thank you from the podium during the luncheon).

For more information, contact Lorna Bautista or any ICP staff person at ext. 2475. 

Ask UNF
Aquatic exercise worth considering

Dr. Cath Lee McKiniry photo by Kailyn HopkinsAny person of any age, non-swimmer or swimmer, at any fitness level from sedentary to active, can benefit from aquatic exercise. Exercising in the water is a fun, safe way to achieve or maintain fitness. Here’s what Cath Lee McKiniry, water exercise supervisor at the UNF Aquatic Center, has to say about the benefits of exercising in the water.

What are the benefits?

There are numerous benefits to performing exercise in the water. The buoyancy or floating effect of water serves to greatly reduce pressure and impact, thus movements are gentle and easy on the joints, notably ankles, knees, hips, back and shoulders. Because water supports the body while exercising, the muscles and joints are allowed a much fuller range of comfortable movements. Hydrostatic pressure refers to the pressure exerted by water on the immersed body; this factor can decrease swelling in joints and tissues and have a positive effect on blood pressure during and after exercise. Better circulation, a healthier heart and increased energy are also additional benefits.

What is the advantage of water exercise compared to land exercise?

Water weighs 8.5 pounds per gallon. As we move against the weight of the water, our arms, legs and body experience resistance in every direction and every movement. In water, even walking with simple arm movements provides greater benefit versus walking on land due to the water weight/resistance factor. Using the resistance of the water is an excellent way to promote and maintain muscular endurance. Doctors and therapists often recommend aqua exercise for overall health and fitness, as well as for conditions such as rehabilitation of the knee, back, hip, shoulder injury, joint replacement, blood pressure concerns and recovery from a heart attack, plus posture and balance issues related to fall prevention. Please note that before beginning any new exercise activity, all individuals should consult their physician.

Is aqua exercise helpful for weight control and weight loss?

All exercise is beneficial in these areas; however, overweight individual will experience fewer restrictions in the water, allowing more vigorous movement and more calories burned. A person may have very limited ability to move through exercise movements on land; water reduces the gravity effect, supports the body and allows the individual to move quite freely.

What types of exercises are done in the water?

You don’t have to be a swimmer to enjoy aquatic exercise; most movements are in a standing position with feet placed on the pool bottom. At UNF classes are multi-level, meaning a person new to aqua exercise can participate with more advanced class members. Low and high intensity land-based exercise modes such as yoga, Pilates, cardio-aerobics and resistance training with equipment are adapted to the water.

What can senior citizens expect to gain from water exercise?

Daily activities related to independent living are enhanced by re-establishing and maintaining good muscle balance. Water pressure reduces swelling of inflamed joints, and exercise increases energy and an overall sense of well-being. The national Arthritis Foundation has had an aquatic exercise program for many years and is offered at UNF.

Every month, the column “Ask UNF” runs in Inside and The Florida Times-Union, promoting the expertise of UNF faculty and staff. 

Faculty & Staff

Brooks College of Health

 
No submissions this month.

Coggin College of Business 

 

Accounting and Finance: In October, Dr. Charles Calhoun attended the first Forum of International Accountancy Regulators in Boston where he presented a paper, “Efforts to Improve International Mobility.” The forum was sponsored by the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy.

Dr. Lynn Jones’ co-authored article, “Master Limited Partnership Investments: Characteristics, Tax Issues, and Choices,” will appear in the December CPA Journal.

Marketing and Logistics: Dr. David Cantor’s paper titled “Decision Making in the Supply Chain: Examining Problem Solving Approaches and Information Availability" (with John Macdonald) has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Operations Management. The paper will appear next year in Issue No. 3 or 4.

Dr. Adel El-Ansary was invited to speak at the Jagdish N. Seth Symposium at Emory University in November. El-Ansary and Dr. Greg Gundlach’s invited commentary “Contributions of Professor Jagdish Seth to the Field of Relationship Marketing: An Integrative and Illustrative Framework” was published in Relationship Marketing Research, Legends in Marketing Series: Jagdish N. Seth, by Encore Publishing, 2008. Gundlach also was an expert witness for the plaintiff in last year's Supreme Court case, Pereira, Joseph “Price-Fixing Makes Comeback After Supreme Court Ruling,” Wall Street Journal, published Aug. 18, p. A1. In addition, Gundlach contributed five articles to the marketing literature in 2008:

“Introduction to the American Antitrust Institute’s Symposium on Buyer Power” (with Albert Foer), in a forthcoming special issue of the Antitrust Bulletin; “AMA’s New Definition of Marketing, Perspective and Commentary on the 2007 Revision” (with William L. Wilkie), Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, forthcoming; “The American Marketing Association’s New Definition of Marketing: Perspectives on its Implications for Scholarship and the Role and Responsibility of Marketing in Society,” Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Vol. 26, No. 3, 2008; “Buyer Power, The Next Antitrust Agenda: The American Antitrust Institute’s Transition Report on Competition Policy to the 44th President of the United States,” by Vandeplas Publishing. Sharing the credit with Gundlach for an article published in the leading journal of the field, Journal of Business Logistics, are Drs. Robert Frankel, Yemisi Bolumole and Reham Eltantawy in Marketing and Logistics and Antony Paulraj in Management for their article “The Domain and Scope of Supply Chain Management’s Foundational Disciplines” in Insights and Issues to Advance Research, Vol. 29, No. 1, 2008.

College of Arts and Sciences 

Communication: Bobbi Reid Doggett gave a presentation titled “Transforming the Classroom into a Real-Life Public Relations/Advertising Agency” at the Communication Across the Disciplines Convention, sponsored by the Florida Communication Association in Gainesville. At the same convention, Christine K. Holland gave a presentation titled “Engaging Students Beyond the Classroom Walls: Transformational Service Learning in a Small Group Communication Class.”

Drs. Judith J. Sayre and Reetu Grewal gave a presentation titled “Starting the talk: An exploration of electronic chart prompts to initiate physician/patient palliative care discussions” at American Academy on Communication in Healthcare and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine in Madison, Wis.

Criminology and Criminal Justice: Dr. Daniel Pontzer submitted four encyclopedia articles titled "Amphetamines," "Bombings," "Drug Paraphernalia" and "Innocence Projects," which were in the “Forensic Science Encyclopedia” published by Salem Press in October 2008.

Dr. Christine E. Rasche received the 2008 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Division of Women and Crime of the American Society of Criminology.

English: Dr. Marnie Jones presented a paper “Translating Prince Caspian and The Golden Compass from Fiction to Film: Negotiating Theological Issues in a Secular Medium” at the Popular Culture Association in the South/American Culture Association in the South Conference in Louisville in October.

Dr. Tru Leverette published “Guess Who’s Welcome to Dinner: Contemporary Interracial Romance and the New Racism” in Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture, Vol. 8, No. 4, fall 2008 (online).

Dr. Clark Lunberry, published his poem “Words Away: A Poem in 125 Parts,” in E•ratio online at www.eratiopostmodernpoetry.com .

Dr. Betsy Nies presented a paper “Exploring the Works of Northeast Florida with Duval County’s Public School Teachers” at the Florida College English Association in Ybor City, Fla., in October.

History: Dr. Elizabeth Furdell published “Fatal Thirst: Diabetes in Britain Until Insulin,” by Brill Academic Press. She also presented a paper titled "The Family Physician: A Victorian Manual for Health" at the International Conference on the Book in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Aaron Sheehan-Dean published “The Concise Historical Atlas of the U.S. Civil War” with Oxford University Press. He was also named series editor for “A Nation Divided: The Civil War Era” at the University of Virginia Press.

Mathematics and Statistics: Dr. Beyza Aslan presented a talk titled “The Change in Electric Potential Due to Lightning” at the American Mathematical Society 2008 Fall Southeastern meeting at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

Music: In October, Dr. Krzysztof Biernacki performed a solo voice recital at Carnegie Hall including works by Mozart, Donizetti, Puccini, Moniuszko, Tchaikovsky and Wagner.

Dr. Nick Curry performed at the College Music Society National Conference; and with Trio Florida (with pianist Gary Smart and violinist Simon Shiao) on the UNF campus, in Amelia Island and on the EMMA music masters-lectures and recital series at Flagler College. He was also the continuo cellist for the Jacksonville premiere of the Monteverdi’s “Vespers of 1610.”

Dr. Marc Dickman was a featured artist at the 2008 Amelia Island Jazz Festival.

Dennis Marks performed in October at the club Snug Harbor, considered the top jazz club in New Orleans. He also performed with Grammy Award winning trumpeter Arturo Sandoval at Dartmouth College and at the club Iridium in New York City.

Dr. Cara Tasher brought the UNF Chorale, Chamber Singers and Women's Chorus to perform in the Jacksonville Intercollegiate Choral Festival. She conducted the Jacksonville premiere of Monteverdi's “Vespers of 1610” with the UNF Chamber Singers in November. The UNF Women's Chorus participated in the American Choral Director's Association state conference in Lake Mary, Fla.

Dr. Randy Tinnin published George Frideric Handel’s “‘Let the Bright Seraphim: Thoughts on Modern Performance” in the International Journal of the Arts in Society, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2008.

Philosophy: Dr. Mitchell Haney published “On the Need for Theory in Business Ethics” in Normative Theory and Business Ethics, Rowman and Littlefield.

Dr. Rico Vitz presented his paper "Lies, Captivating Lies, and Religious Belief: Hume on the Learned Elite and the Christian Superstition” at the Western Regional meeting of the Society of Christian Philosophers.

Political Science and Public Administration: Dr. Hyunsun Choi published an article, “Minneapolis with Arts and Lakes”, in the Korean journal Kook To (Planning and Policy), Vol. 324, October 2008.

Dr. David Schwam-Baird delivered a paper titled “The Real Meaning of the ‘Shia Crescent’ for U.S. Foreign Policy: America's Middle East Policy as a Victim of its Own Success” at the 26th Annual Meeting of the Association for Third World Studies held at Millersville University in Lancaster, Pa.

In November, Dr. Pamela Zeiser served on the National Screening Committee for Fulbright Awards, specifically the committee for graduate study in Ireland.

Psychology: Dr. Adam C. Carle and Stephen J. Blumberg of the National Center for Health Statistics presented a keynote address at the Alfred I DuPont Hospital for Children, Pediatrics, titled “The Impact of Complex Needs on the Well-Being of Children with Special Health Care Needs and their Families.” With Lauren Levine and Dr. Julia A. Watkins from Nutrition and Dietetics, he also presented “Disparities in Barriers to Substance Abuse Treatment Across Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders and Asians” at the 136th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Public Health Association in San Diego.

Drs. Dominik Gűss and Tes Tuason published a chapter titled “A Cultural-Psychological Theory of Suicide Terrorism and What to Do about Suicide Terrorism” in Global Community: Global Security, Rodopi Publishers.

Dr. Iver Iversen was guest lecturer and gave several presentations about his research on communication learning in paralyzed people and motor-skill learning in chimpanzees at the University of Oslo and Akershus University in Oslo in October.

Dr. Christopher Leone gave a symposium presentation at the 30th Annual Meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists. His presentation was titled “Social Psychology and Mentoring: Cultivating Today’s Students and Tomorrow’s Scholars.” He also chaired a symposium on “Thriving and Surviving: Graduate Training and Careers in Social Psychology.”

Dr. Michael Toglia received the Distinguished Service Award from Phi Eta Sigma, the national freshman honor society, at their National Convention held in Louisville in October.

Sociology and Anthropology: Drs. Melissa D. Hargrove and JeffriAnne Wilder organized and participated in the inaugural forum for their collaborative series, Deconstructing “Race” in the 21st Century, titled “Examining the Intersections of Race, Class and Gender in the Presidential Election.” Among the invited forum panelists was UNF anthropologist Dr. Ron Kephart and Dr. Henry Thomas of Political Science and Public Administration.

Dr. Rick Phillips published an article titled “De Facto Congregationalism and Mormon Missionary Outreach: An Ethnographic Case Study” in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.

 

College of Computing, Engineering and Construction

Construction Management: Dr. John Dryden was recently appointed to the Advisory Committee of the Florida Department of Health Bureau of Onsite Sewage Programs Research Review.

School of Engineering: Dr. Adel El Safty (with Russell Coby, Upul Attanayake and Khalid Yousri) presented and published their paper “Shear Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete Bridge Girders with FRP Laminates” at the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute – Federal Highway Administration National Bridge Conference, in October. El Safty also taught Professional Engineering exam review sessions for 50 engineers in Orlando on steel design, concrete design, structural analysis, strength of materials and seismic events.

Dr. Thobias Sando (with Geophrey Mbatta and Ren Moses) published their paper “Developing Transit Station Design Criteria with a Focus on Intermodal Connectivity” in the Journal of Transportation Research Forum, Vol. 47, No. 3.

Dr. Pat Welsh participated in the board of directors meeting of the Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) and was selected as the chairman of the SECOORA Science Committee in October. Welsh also participated in the Board of Governors meeting of the IBM Research LA Grid Summit meeting and presented UNF’s research activities on hurricane mitigation in October.

School of Computing: Drs. Albert Ritzhaupt and Karthikeyan Umapathy, and Lisa Jamba presented and published their paper “An Investigation of the AITP Membership Using the Ideal Computing Association Survey” at the Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP) meeting in October.

Academic Research Technology Services: Donald Cowart, Terry Smith and Michael Weeks presented a seminar on high-performance computing, "Building a Beowulf Cluster Using Ubuntu Linux," at the Jacksonville Linux Users Group meeting in October.

Dean’s Office: Dr. Jerry Merckel gave two invited presentations, “Keys to Success” to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers student chapter and “How to Secure Research Funding,” in a faculty forum sponsored by Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

College of Education and Human Services 


Foundations and Secondary Education: Dr. Richard Chant and his wife, Antonia, a first-grade teacher at Chets Creek Elementary, presented a session at the National Council for the Social Studies Conference in November in Houston. The session, “Everything Comes from Something, A Literacy-based Lesson on Natural Resources,” demonstrated teaching activities that integrate geography concepts, children’s literature and critical thought.

Dr. Cassandra Etgeton presented a session titled "Teaching Algebra to People Who Don't Think Like Me” at the Florida Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Convention in downtown Jacksonville in October.

Drs. Marianne and Lehman Barnes presented a session titled “Action Research for Better Science Teaching” at the first annual Southwestern New Mexico Science Teachers Association meeting at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, N.M., in November.

Childhood Education: Dr. Wanda Hedrick presented a paper to the College Reading Association in Sarasota (with co-authors, Drs. Janis Harmon and Karen Wood). The title of the presentation was “An Investigation of Word Walls: Perceptions of Middle School Students and Instructional Potential.” Hedrick also presented research findings at the National Reading Conference in Orlando, again with co-authors Harmon and Wood. The title of the presentation was “An Investigation of Current Reading Programs for Middle and High School Students.” The trio also recently published an article titled “Prominent Content Vocabulary Strategies and What Secondary Pre-service Teachers Think About Them” in Reading Psychology, Vol. 29, Issue 5, 2008.

Dr. Christine Weber presented a session with a colleague on “Working on Gifted Issues: The WOGI Project” and another session “The Working on Gifted Issues Parent Workshops” with Dr. Laurel Stanley at the National Association for Gifted Children Annual Convention in Tampa in October. Weber also co-authored a white paper with a colleague from Volusia County titled “Rising to the Challenge: Supporting Gifted Education in Florida,” which was disseminated to educational leaders in Florida at the conference.

Office of Educational Field Experiences: Crystal Timmons and Maria Ramdas conducted two days of Clinical Educator Training at the Discovery School in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, in November. The workshop is a follow-up of an earlier trip to Honduras this year by Drs. Otilia Salmon and John Kemppainen to establish international sites in Central America where College of Education and Human Service’s interns are able to gain valuable experience in working with learners of other cultures.

Office of the Dean: Dr. Marsha Lupi co-presented “Connecting Special Education Pedagogy to Leadership” at the Annual Conference of the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children in Dallas in November. Lupi also participated on a panel on Legal Advocacy and the Role of the Special Education Professor presenting to doctoral students during their annual one-day meeting at the TED conference.

Other Departments/Divisions 


Intercultural Center for PEACE: Dr. Oupa Seane published “Overthrowing Robert Mugabe” in Global Peace, an international journal of philosophy, peace, education, culture and civilization, Vol. 8, No. 1, September 2008. 

Get to Know
Fred Beck, M.D.

Dr. Fred Beck photo by Kailyn HopkinsDepartment: Student Medical Services
Job: Medical Director
Years at UNF: Seven

What is the best thing you ever won?
That would probably be a signed limited-edition print of Brett Favre I won with a $3 raffle ticket. Or actually, I might say the jersey Morton Anderson was wearing when he missed the field goal to allow the Jaguars to make it into the playoffs for the first time ever (but that one did cost me several dollars through Coach Coughlin’s charity auction, so maybe I didn’t technically win it).

If you won the lottery, what would you do with the money?
In all honesty, I’ve never really had a desire to win the lottery. I’ve always tried to be financially conservative and not incur debt and in the words of the immortal Nacho Libre, “My life is good.” However, with the financial meltdown and my 410K becoming a 101B, I probably could find a few things to do with the money.

What was the best money you ever spent?
It was probably when I bought a cabin on the Altamaha River 10 years ago. I was working like a dog in those days and being able to retreat into the middle of nowhere clearly protected my sanity, if not also preventing me from having a heart attack or stroke.

What was the proudest/happiest moment in your life?
That would clearly be when I married my wife and when my children were born. Being a parent gives one a completely different perspective on life, and I truly believe you’ve not experienced all life has to offer until you have children.

Tell us about your family:
My wife Julie and I have been married for 19 years. She was my cashier at Publix and after going through her line many times, I asked her out. I thought she was 25, she thought I was about 25, and we were both surprised when we realized there was an 11-year age difference. Our kids are: Lauren, age 15, and Logan, age 10. We relish our time together as a family.

What would you like to do when you retire?
I’m a very active person, and I would like to spend much of my time bike riding, hiking, kayaking, golfing and fishing. I’ve had the collecting bug (records and CDs, sports memorabilia, baseball cards, etc.) for years and I’d like to spend more time listening to some of the music I’ve acquired. Of course, I’d like to go to places I’ve never been and one particular fantasy would be to take a very leisurely trip around the United States going to various minor league baseball parks. I would like to stay active in my field, and retirement would give me time to engage in more volunteer medicine.

What is your favorite thing about working at UNF?
As a physician, I treasure the opportunity to be able to practice medicine without drowning in paperwork. Sadly, primary care physicians in our country have experienced a major erosion in their collective morale brought on by third-party intrusions and the increasing need to devote more time to medication overrides, pre-authorizations for referrals or procedures, etc.

I am able to focus on making a proper diagnosis and giving detailed instructions to my patients without these encumbrances. I’ve had the pleasure of periodically giving guest lectures, which is a nice change of pace. Additionally, this year we’ve formed a new liaison with the Mayo Clinic Family Medicine Residency program and every month Student Health Services hosts one of their residents for 20-30 hours per week. This has proven to be incredibly intellectually stimulating and has reinvigorated our entire staff as we’ve engaged in more clinical discussions regarding vexing problems, and we’ve routinely reviewed pertinent clinical reviews from publications such as the New England Journal of Medicine.

The Mayo residents have uniformly expressed the benefit they’ve received from this, as it gives them an opportunity to be on the front lines of medicine and take an appropriate history from truly ambulatory patients who don’t come already armed with an extensive medical history.

If you were not working at UNF what would you be doing?
I’d likely be back in a traditional practice, or perhaps doing urgent care type medical work, which does provide predictable hours and less paperwork.

What is your favorite way to blow an hour?
When I have a free lunch hour, there’s nothing I enjoy more than walking our beautiful UNF nature trails. We’re fortunate to have this much nature around us.

What person had the greatest impact on your life?
I would have to say Jesus Christ has provided the template for me to try to conduct my activities. I truly believe if more people followed the Golden Rule and treated others as they would like to be treated, we would have a far better world. I fall short but I do keep trying.

Who is the most famous person you ever met?
I’d have to say one of the most gracious famous people I ever met was jazz legend Dizzy Gillespie in 1990. He chatted with my wife and me for quite a while and we shared stories about our common origins in the Carolinas. When we go to see my mother in Wadesboro, N.C., we pass a 7-foot bronze statue of him in Cheraw, S.C. That’s probably the only time I’ll ever see a statue of someone I’ve met.

What was the first concert you attended, and what was the most recent?

The first was an outdoor show at Memorial Stadium in Charlotte. WAYS was a sister station to Jacksonville’s WAPE and every year they had their Big Ways Birthday. For 99 cents we got to see a long lineup of one-hit wonders including Steam (“Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye”), Bobby Sherman, the Brooklyn Bridge and others.

The most recent was a country rock band with a 40-year history, Poco. They played at the fair with a sparse, but enthusiastic crowd in attendance. In between, 20 years ago another fellow and I promoted John Lee Hooker in Jacksonville and Orlando. A few short months after this, he was on an HBO special playing on stage with the Rolling Stones and Eric Clapton. If you never boogied with the Hook, you don’t know what you missed!

Last book read:
That would be Randy Pausch’s “The Last Lecture.” This was a quick read that was truly inspirational and helps one put things in perspective. His attitude, despite his impending death, speaks volumes about the way we should live our lives.

Good Question

StarbucksQ – From Kate Mattingly, Coggin College of Business: Can you tell me why the Starbucks on campus declines to participate in many loyalty-building and revenue-increasing programs (i.e., free coffee on election day, selling gift cards, etc.) offered by other Starbucks around town?

A – From Dave Jordan, Chartwells: Starbucks franchised stores do not operate under the same guidelines as company operated stores. Promotions that work in company stores don’t always have the same impact on campus, and we prefer to offer free coffee after hours during finals week and during the “Meet the Presidents” discussions. It also allows us to donate to some of the campus organizations that have requests during the year, although we can’t accommodate all of the hundreds of requests that we receive.

Q — From Elaine Baker, College of Computing, Engineering and Construction: I have a pygmy date palm in my front yard and it is quite exposed. What would be the best method to prevent freeze damage? I have two bags of mulch around the base and a sheet over the top.

A — From Chuck Hubbuch, Landscape and Grounds: Pygmy dates will tolerate freezing temperatures for a few hours. They show damage when temperatures drop into the mid-20s or when they experience subfreezing temperatures for several hours. Typically, we hit our lowest temperature just before the sun comes up and then the temperature rises again. In general, a sheet does not offer much cold protection, especially if it is moist from dew. One of the best ways of protecting a plant is by covering it with a corrugated cardboard box. A friend of mine saves refrigerator and other appliance boxes in his garage for this purpose. An alternative is to put stakes in the ground around the plant and wrap it with plastic. This method traps warm air around the plant, effectively making a miniature greenhouse. Two things are critical: 1) cover the plant while the air is still warm, and 2) create enough space so leaves do not touch the plastic. Be careful about mulching too thickly and restricting air to the roots. Where palms are concerned, it is more important to cover the leafy top than the roots. Specifically, if the central bud at the top of the stem dies, the whole plant will die. Palm buds can be protected by tying the leaves up (very carefully with a spiny date palm) and wrapping the top of the plant with a good insulating material, maybe an old quilt or sleeping bag. 

Dateline

Welcome

The following employees were either hired or assumed new positions at UNF from mid-October to mid-November:

Stephen Fagan, construction project specialist for Physical Facilities
Yolanda Harris, senior financial aid officer for Enrollment Services
Corinne Housley, custodial worker for Physical Facilities
Susannah Jischke, program assistant for the Center for International Education
Emily Milward, assistant director of advancement and alumni affairs for the Brooks College of Heath
Andrew Richardson, maintenance mechanic for Physical Facilities
Mark Ward, groundskeeper for Physical Facilities

Milestone Anniversaries

Congratulations to the following employees, who will celebrate milestone anniversaries in December and January:

25 Years:
Leonard Jacob, director of education and training for the Institute of Police Technology and Management

20 Years:
John Touchton, senior library technical assistant for the Thomas G. Carpenter Library

15 Years:
Dan Endicott, director of Environmental Health and Safety
Raheem Roberts, police communications manager for the University Police Department
Linda Wilson, coordinator of computer applications for Enterprise Systems
Donald Barker, crime scene coordinator for the Institute of Police Technology and Management
Betty Bennett director of the Educator Preparation Institute in the College of Education and Human Services
Kerry Clark, associate professor for Public Health
Renee Duke, coordinator of computer applications for Enterprise Systems
Shawn Faulkner, law enforcement sergeant for the University Police Department
Cheresa Hamilton, director of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

10 Years:
Candace Hickson, coordinator of academic support services for One Stop Student Services
Anne Hopkins, professor for Political Science and Public Administration
Joseph Lynch, coordinator of computer applications for the College of Education and Human Services
Pamela Niemczyk, administrative assistant for the Brooks College of Health
Kevin Roop, coordinator of marketing and publications for the Institute of Police Technology and Management

Five Years:
Sharon Ashton, assistant vice president of public relations for Institutional Advancement
Frank Brown, senior custodial worker for Physical Facilities
Olivia Daniels, custodial supervisor for Physical Facilities
John Dean, associate director the University Police Department
Kempton Jackson, recycler for Physical Facilities
Janet Killackey, adjunct instructor for the Brooks College of Health
Scott Peden, coordinator for Enterprise Systems
Richard Rains, telecommunications services specialist for Auxiliary Services
Chris Ward, senior custodial worker for Physical Facilities

Correction: In the November issue of Inside, we incorrectly listed Kathleen Cohen as celebrating her 30th anniversary at UNF last month. She was hired at UNF 11/3/73, so she actually celebrated her 35th anniversary. Sorry for the error!

Congratulations
Gloria Beachem (Continuing Education) gave birth to David William Beachem Nov. 6. David weighed 8 pounds and 1 ounce.

Dr. Yemisi Bolumole (Marketing and Logistics) and Fred Sudler (Information Technology Services) celebrated the birth of their son Joshua Oct. 10. The couple also has another son, Samuel.

Miles David Greer, Born November 8, 2008Leslie Greer (Institutional Advancement) and her husband, Wes, welcomed their first child, Miles David Greer, who was born Nov. 8. Miles weighed 5 pounds and 10 ounces. (see photo)

Evelyn Serrano was promoted Sept. 20 to office manager for the Controller’s Office (oops ... we failed to include this news in the last issue of Inside).

On Nov. 4, Kara Wade Tucker (Disability Resource Center) was elected to the Neptune Beach City Council, Seat 3.

Farewell
After more than 10 years of serving as an academic adviser and an adjunct instructor in the College of Education and Human Services, Dr. Thelecia Wilson resigned her position at UNF to pursue other opportunities